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MAPS in the cloud: How can it help your enterprise?

January 21st, 2015 No comments

Malware can easily send a huge enterprise infrastructure into a tailspin. However, you can get greater protection from malware by using services in the cloud.  

Yes, there’s an opportunity to get real-time results from suspicious malware triggers where your system can:

  1. Consult the cloud upon detecting suspicious malware behaviors.
  2. Respond by blocking malware based on derived logic from the account ecosystem data, and local signals from the client.

How? Through the Microsoft Active Protection Service (MAPS). 

What is MAPS?

The Microsoft Active Protection Service is the cloud service that enables:

  • Clients to report key telemetry events and suspicious malware queries to the cloud
  • Cloud to provide real-time blocking responses back to the client

The MAPS service is available for all Microsoft's antivirus products and services, including:

  • Microsoft Forefront Endpoint Protection
  • Microsoft Security Essentials
  • System Center Endpoint Protection
  • Windows Defender on Windows 8 and later versions

What can MAPS do for your enterprise software security?

Enabling MAPS in your system gives you:

  • Greater malware protection through cloud-delivered malware-blocking decisions

Enable MAPS to trigger cloud calls for suspicious events. Doing so helps ensure that the machine uses the latest malware information available from the Microsoft Malware Protection Center (MMPC) research team, back-end big data, and machine learning logic.

  • Aggregated protection telemetry

    Leverage the latest ecosystem-wide detection techniques offered through the cloud. Microsoft aggregates protection telemetry from over one billion clients, and cross-references them with numerous signals.

MMPC threat intelligence leverages algorithms to construct and manage a view of threats in the ecosystem. When the endpoint product encounters suspicious activities, it can consult the cloud for real-time analysis before acting on it.

The vast data and computing resources available in the cloud allows the fast detection of polymorphic and emerging threats and the application of advanced protection techniques.

At a high level, here's what the MAPS protection looks like:

How the MAPS cloud protection and telemetry works from the endpoint and back

Figure 1: How the cloud protection and telemetry works from the endpoint and back.

Client machines selectively send telemetry in real-time (for detection), or periodically (for health checks) to the Microsoft Malware Protection Center’s (MMPC) cloud service which includes:

  • Threat telemetry –  to identify the threats, threat-related resources, and remediation results
  • Suspicious behavior – to collect samples, determine what to monitor and remediate
  • Heartbeat – to check the system's pulse to know if the antivirus application is still running, and if it has the updated version

The MMPC cloud service responds to client telemetry with: 

  • Cloud actions – which include context and a set of instructions from the cloud on how to handle a potential threat (for example, block it).
  • Cloud false positive mitigation response – to suppress false positive malware detections

The data gathered is treated with confidentiality. See the Microsoft System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection Privacy Statement for details. To help protect your privacy, reports are sent to Microsoft over an encrypted connection. Relevant data is analyzed

 

What the data shows

Figure 2: Percentage of protection MAPS can contribute over a six-month period

Figure 2: Percentage of protection MAPS can contribute over a six-month period

If we take the System Center Endpoint Protection data as an example, you'll see how MAPS is contributing 10% of protection to enterprise users on SCEP systems.

Imagine living without it – there'll be 10% more machines infected, and 10% more chance of intruders.

 

Prerequisites 
Both Basic membership and Advanced membership enable cloud protection. See the Microsoft Active Protection Service (MAPS) section of the Microsoft System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection Privacy Statement for details.

By default, MAPS Basic is enabled in all of Microsoft’s new antimalware products. For enterprise customers, you have to enable it to get cloud protection from new threats that are coming in.

With the Advanced membership, you can get more information about the malware and/or suspicious behaviour. Such information can give your enterprise infrastructure better protection.

To get your system ready for MAPS, see the Introduction to Endpoint Protection in Configuration Manager.   

 

So, what can you do to protect your enterprise? 

Keep MAPS enabled on your system.  

Join the Microsoft Active Protection Service Community.

To check if MAPS is enabled in your Microsoft security product, select Settings and then select MAPS:

With the MAPS option enabled, Microsoft anti-malware security product can take full advantage of Microsoft's cloud protection service

Figure 3: With the MAPS option enabled, Microsoft anti-malware security product can take full advantage of Microsoft's cloud protection service

 

MMPC

MAPS in the cloud: How can it help your enterprise?

January 21st, 2015 No comments

Malware can easily send a huge enterprise infrastructure into a tailspin. However, you can get greater protection from malware by using services in the cloud.  

Yes, there’s an opportunity to get real-time results from suspicious malware triggers where your system can:

  1. Consult the cloud upon detecting suspicious malware behaviors.
  2. Respond by blocking malware based on derived logic from the account ecosystem data, and local signals from the client.

How? Through the Microsoft Active Protection Service (MAPS). 

What is MAPS?

The Microsoft Active Protection Service is the cloud service that enables:

  • Clients to report key telemetry events and suspicious malware queries to the cloud
  • Cloud to provide real-time blocking responses back to the client

The MAPS service is available for all Microsoft's antivirus products and services, including:

  • Microsoft Forefront Endpoint Protection
  • Microsoft Security Essentials
  • System Center Endpoint Protection
  • Windows Defender on Windows 8 and later versions

What can MAPS do for your enterprise software security?

Enabling MAPS in your system gives you:

  • Greater malware protection through cloud-delivered malware-blocking decisions

Enable MAPS to trigger cloud calls for suspicious events. Doing so helps ensure that the machine uses the latest malware information available from the Microsoft Malware Protection Center (MMPC) research team, back-end big data, and machine learning logic.

  • Aggregated protection telemetry

    Leverage the latest ecosystem-wide detection techniques offered through the cloud. Microsoft aggregates protection telemetry from over one billion clients, and cross-references them with numerous signals.

MMPC threat intelligence leverages algorithms to construct and manage a view of threats in the ecosystem. When the endpoint product encounters suspicious activities, it can consult the cloud for real-time analysis before acting on it.

The vast data and computing resources available in the cloud allows the fast detection of polymorphic and emerging threats and the application of advanced protection techniques.

At a high level, here's what the MAPS protection looks like:

How the MAPS cloud protection and telemetry works from the endpoint and back

Figure 1: How the cloud protection and telemetry works from the endpoint and back.

Client machines selectively send telemetry in real-time (for detection), or periodically (for health checks) to the Microsoft Malware Protection Center’s (MMPC) cloud service which includes:

  • Threat telemetry –  to identify the threats, threat-related resources, and remediation results
  • Suspicious behavior – to collect samples, determine what to monitor and remediate
  • Heartbeat – to check the system's pulse to know if the antivirus application is still running, and if it has the updated version

The MMPC cloud service responds to client telemetry with: 

  • Cloud actions – which include context and a set of instructions from the cloud on how to handle a potential threat (for example, block it).
  • Cloud false positive mitigation response – to suppress false positive malware detections

The data gathered is treated with confidentiality. See the Microsoft System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection Privacy Statement for details. To help protect your privacy, reports are sent to Microsoft over an encrypted connection. Relevant data is analyzed

 

What the data shows

Figure 2: Percentage of protection MAPS can contribute over a six-month period

Figure 2: Percentage of protection MAPS can contribute over a six-month period

If we take the System Center Endpoint Protection data as an example, you'll see how MAPS is contributing 10% of protection to enterprise users on SCEP systems.

Imagine living without it – there'll be 10% more machines infected, and 10% more chance of intruders.

 

Prerequisites 
Both Basic membership and Advanced membership enable cloud protection. See the Microsoft Active Protection Service (MAPS) section of the Microsoft System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection Privacy Statement for details.

By default, MAPS Basic is enabled in all of Microsoft’s new antimalware products. For enterprise customers, you have to enable it to get cloud protection from new threats that are coming in.

With the Advanced membership, you can get more information about the malware and/or suspicious behaviour. Such information can give your enterprise infrastructure better protection.

To get your system ready for MAPS, see the Introduction to Endpoint Protection in Configuration Manager.   

 

So, what can you do to protect your enterprise? 

Keep MAPS enabled on your system.  

Join the Microsoft Active Protection Service Community.

To check if MAPS is enabled in your Microsoft security product, select Settings and then select MAPS:

With the MAPS option enabled, Microsoft anti-malware security product can take full advantage of Microsoft's cloud protection service

Figure 3: With the MAPS option enabled, Microsoft anti-malware security product can take full advantage of Microsoft's cloud protection service

 

MMPC

What to do if your antivirus subscription has expired

September 16th, 2014 No comments

Phil asks:

I’m new to Windows 8.1. Now that my free security software has expired, how do I go about making Windows Defender my choice security method?

Windows Defender is included with Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 and helps protect your PC against malware (malicious software). Many new computers come with free subscriptions to antivirus software and other security programs from companies other than Microsoft. If the subscription runs out and you don’t want to pay for it, you need to:

  1. Fully uninstall the non-Microsoft security software that came with your computer.
  2. Make sure Windows Defender is turned on.

To uninstall the security software that came with your computer, check the software’s Help file.

Make sure Windows Defender is turned on in Windows 8

  1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen and tap Search (or if you’re using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search).
  2. In the Search box, type Windows Defender.
  3. Tap or click the Windows Defender icon.
  4. Go to Settings, and make sure that Turn on real-time protection (recommended) is selected.
  5. Tap or click Save Changes.

What to do if your antivirus subscription has expired

September 16th, 2014 No comments

Phil asks:

I’m new to Windows 8.1. Now that my free security software has expired, how do I go about making Windows Defender my choice security method?

Windows Defender is included with Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 and helps protect your PC against malware (malicious software). Many new computers come with free subscriptions to antivirus software and other security programs from companies other than Microsoft. If the subscription runs out and you don’t want to pay for it, you need to:

  1. Fully uninstall the non-Microsoft security software that came with your computer.
  2. Make sure Windows Defender is turned on.

To uninstall the security software that came with your computer, check the software’s Help file.

Make sure Windows Defender is turned on in Windows 8

  1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen and tap Search (or if you’re using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search).
  2. In the Search box, type Windows Defender.
  3. Tap or click the Windows Defender icon.
  4. Go to Settings, and make sure that Turn on real-time protection (recommended) is selected.
  5. Tap or click Save Changes.

What to do if your antivirus subscription has expired

September 16th, 2014 No comments

Phil asks:

I’m new to Windows 8.1. Now that my free security software has expired, how do I go about making Windows Defender my choice security method?

Windows Defender is included with Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 and helps protect your PC against malware (malicious software). Many new computers come with free subscriptions to antivirus software and other security programs from companies other than Microsoft. If the subscription runs out and you don’t want to pay for it, you need to:

  1. Fully uninstall the non-Microsoft security software that came with your computer.
  2. Make sure Windows Defender is turned on.

To uninstall the security software that came with your computer, check the software’s Help file.

Make sure Windows Defender is turned on in Windows 8

  1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen and tap Search (or if you’re using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search).
  2. In the Search box, type Windows Defender.
  3. Tap or click the Windows Defender icon.
  4. Go to Settings, and make sure that Turn on real-time protection (recommended) is selected.
  5. Tap or click Save Changes.

Get advance notice about September 2014 security updates

September 4th, 2014 No comments

Today, the Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC) posted details about the September security updates.

If you have automatic updating turned on, most of these updates will download and install on their own. Sometimes you may need to provide input for Windows Update during an installation. In this case, you’ll see an alert in the notification area at the far right of the taskbar—be sure to click it.

In Windows 8, Windows will turn on automatic updating during setup unless you choose to turn it off. To check this setting and turn on automatic updating, open the Search charm, enter Turn automatic updating on or off, and tap or click Settings to find it. 

Learn how to install Windows Updates in Windows 7.

If you are a technical professional

The Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification Service offers details about security updates approximately three business days before they are released. We do this to enable customers (especially IT professionals) to plan for effective deployment of security updates.

Sign up for security notifications

Get advance notice about September 2014 security updates

September 4th, 2014 No comments

Today, the Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC) posted details about the September security updates.

If you have automatic updating turned on, most of these updates will download and install on their own. Sometimes you may need to provide input for Windows Update during an installation. In this case, you’ll see an alert in the notification area at the far right of the taskbar—be sure to click it.

In Windows 8, Windows will turn on automatic updating during setup unless you choose to turn it off. To check this setting and turn on automatic updating, open the Search charm, enter Turn automatic updating on or off, and tap or click Settings to find it.

Learn how to install Windows Updates in Windows 7.

If you are a technical professional

The Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification Service offers details about security updates approximately three business days before they are released. We do this to enable customers (especially IT professionals) to plan for effective deployment of security updates.

Sign up for security notifications

Get advance notice about August 2014 security updates

August 7th, 2014 No comments

Today, the Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC) posted details about the August security updates.

If you have automatic updating turned on, most of these updates will download and install on their own. Sometimes you may need to provide input for Windows Update during an installation. In this case, you’ll see an alert in the notification area at the far right of the taskbar—be sure to click it.

In Windows 8, Windows will turn on automatic updating during setup unless you choose to turn it off. To check this setting and turn on automatic updating, open the Search charm, enter Turn automatic updating on or off, and tap or click Settings to find it. 

Learn how to install Windows Updates in Windows 7.

If you are a technical professional

The Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification Service offers details about security updates approximately three business days before they are released. We do this to enable customers (especially IT professionals) to plan for effective deployment of security updates.

Sign up for security notifications

9 ways to stay safe online this summer

July 17th, 2014 No comments

Summer is in full swing. Here are our best safety and security tips for the season.

  1. Don’t broadcast vacation plans on your social networking sites. If you’re leaving your home unoccupied and at risk for potential burglary, you might want to wait to post your vacation photographs until you return home. Get more tips for email and social networking safety.

  2. Limit who knows your location. Before you go on vacation, take a few minutes to adjust settings for sharing your location on your social networking sites and any apps on your smartphone. If you have kids who go online, make sure they know this, too. For more information, see Use location services more safely.

  3. Set computer and device rules for when you’re not around. If your kids are old enough to stay home alone when they’re not at school, make sure you talk to them about Internet safety. Download our tip sheet for pointers to jump-start—or continue—online safety conversations.

  4. Learn how to use parental controls. All Microsoft products include built-in privacy controls and safeguards that put you in charge of your children’s entertainment experiences and allow you to customize how personal information is, or is not, shared. Get step-by-step guidance on how to switch on safety settings across Microsoft technology and devices at home.

  5. Stay safe when playing games online. If your children’s summer sport of choice is the Xbox, Xbox One, Kinect, or other online or console game, learn about the core family safety features of Xbox One and find other ways to help kids play it safe.

  6. Update your software on your laptop or tablet. Before you go on vacation, make sure all your software is updated, to help prevent problems caused by hackers. If your laptop is still running Windows XP, read about the end of support for Windows XP.

  7. Check the security level of public Wi-Fi networks before you use them. Choose the most secure connection—even if that means you have to pay for access. A password-protected connection (ideally one that is unique for your use) is better than one without a password. Both Windows 7 and Windows 8 can help you evaluate and minimize network security risks.

  8. Avoid typing sensitive information on your laptop using an unsecured wireless connection. If possible, save your financial transactions for after your summer vacation on a secured home connection. For more information, see How to know if a financial transaction is secure.

  9. Watch out for suspicious messages from your friends on vacation asking for money. This is a common scam cybercriminals use when they’ve hacked into someone’s account. Find a different way to contact your friend. Learn more about scam email messages.

Get advance notice about July 2014 security updates

July 3rd, 2014 No comments

Today, the Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC) posted details about the July security updates.

If you have automatic updating turned on, most of these updates will download and install on their own. Sometimes you may need to provide input for Windows Update during an installation. In this case, you’ll see an alert in the notification area at the far right of the taskbar—be sure to click it.

In Windows 8, Windows will turn on automatic updating during setup unless you choose to turn it off. To check this setting and turn on automatic updating, open the Search charm, enter Turn automatic updating on or off, and tap or click Settings to find it. 

Learn how to install Windows Updates in Windows 7.

If you are a technical professional

The Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification Service offers details about security updates approximately three business days before they are released. We do this to enable customers (especially IT professionals) to plan for effective deployment of security updates.

Sign up for security notifications

Windows XP registry hack will not protect your PC against all threats

July 1st, 2014 No comments

In April, Microsoft ended support for Windows XP. This means that if your computer is still running Windows XP, you are no longer receiving security updates.

Several tech news sources have recently reported a change that you can make to your Windows registry (known as a “registry hack”) that tells your Windows XP computer that it’s running Windows Embedded or Windows Server 2003.

Although this hack might allow your Windows XP computer to receive automatic updates, these updates will not fully protect your Windows XP computer. And because these updates are not intended for Windows XP, they might also cause your computer to stop working correctly.

If you are running Windows XP, the best way to protect your computer is to upgrade to a modern operating system, like Windows 8.1.

Learn more about your options if your computer is still running Windows XP

Get advance notice about June 2014 security updates

June 5th, 2014 No comments

Today, the Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC) posted details about the June security updates.

If you have automatic updating turned on, most of these updates will download and install on their own. Sometimes you may need to provide input for Windows Update during an installation. In this case, you’ll see an alert in the notification area at the far right of the taskbar—be sure to click it.

In Windows 8, Windows will turn on automatic updating during setup unless you choose to turn it off. To check this setting and turn on automatic updating, open the Search charm, enter Turn automatic updating on or off, and tap or click Settings to find it. 

Learn how to install Windows Updates in Windows 7.

If you are a technical professional

The Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification Service offers details about security updates approximately three business days before they are released. We do this to enable customers (especially IT professionals) to plan for effective deployment of security updates.

Sign up for security notifications

It’s time to install Windows 8.1

May 29th, 2014 No comments

If your computer is running Windows 8, it’s time to download and install the newest version—Windows 8.1.

Windows 8.1 Update (also known as KB 2919355) helps your computer run at optimal performance and includes new features that make the operating system easier to use. If you don’t install Windows 8.1, or if you uninstall it, you might not get future bug fixes, security updates, and new features.

If your computer is set to receive updates automatically, you don’t need to do anything.

To see if you’re running the latest update, see Which Windows operating system am I running? To install the latest update, see Install the latest Windows 8.1 Update

Categories: Windows 8, Windows 8.1 Tags:

Transfer your files to a new computer for free

May 20th, 2014 No comments

Product support for Windows XP ended in April. Moving forward this means that Windows XP based-systems will not receive security updates.

Find out if your computer is running Windows XP. If it is, you might be able to upgrade your computer, or buy a new one.

If you buy a new computer, learn how to move your files, photos, and more for free.

We’ve worked with Laplink to provide you with free data transfer. Laplink PCmover Express for Windows XP is an easy way to move your files, settings, and user profiles from your old computer running Windows XP to your new PC.

Download the free version of PCmover Express to get started

New research shows rise in “deceptive downloads”

May 7th, 2014 No comments

According to the latest cybersecurity report from Microsoft, “deceptive downloads” were the top threat for 95 percent of the 110 countries surveyed.

What are deceptive downloads?

Deceptive downloads are legitimate downloadable programs (usually free) such as software, games, or music that cybercriminals bundle with malicious items.

For example, you might receive a file in email or through social networking, but when you try to open it you see a message that says you don’t have the right software to open it. You do a search online and come across a free software download that claims it can help you open the file. You download that software, but you unknowingly might also be downloading malicious software (also known as “malware”) with it. This malware might have the ability to access personal information on your computer or use your computer for cybercrime.

It could be months or even years before you notice your system has malware.

How can I avoid deceptive downloads?

What should I do if I think I’ve been a victim of a deceptive download?

Do a scan with your antivirus software. If your computer is running Windows 8 or Windows 8.1, you can use the built-in Windows Defender to check for and to help you get rid of a virus or other malware.

If your computer is running Windows 7 or Windows Vista, do the following:

What is the Security Intelligence Report?

The Microsoft Security Intelligence Report (SIR) covers research on computer security, including software vulnerabilities, exploits, and malicious and potentially unwanted software. Volume 16 of the report was released today. If you want to learn more about deceptive downloads and other key findings, please visit Microsoft.com/SIR.

HOW TO: Recycle your old computers and devices for Earth Day

April 22nd, 2014 No comments

Today is Earth Day. Show your love for the globe by getting rid of your old technology in the most environmentally friendly way possible.

Step 1: Back up files or data you want to keep

Use the backup utilities that are built into Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7 to transfer files from your old computer to your new one.

If you’re getting rid of a computer that is running Windows 8, use File History.

Step 2: Remove personal information from your computer or device

If you use a Microsoft Certified Refurbisher, they will help you remove your data and help you donate your equipment to people in need around the world.

If you decide to remove the personal information yourself, wipe your hard drive by using specialized software that is designed to government standards and will overwrite your information (Active@ KillDisk and Softpedia DP Wiper are free downloads). 

Step 3: Find a reputable recycler

If you’ve already used a Microsoft Certified Refurbisher, they can help you find the right place for your old computers and devices. If you’re doing it yourself, you can find a list of Microsoft-sponsored recycling opportunities in your area.

Many places will offer rewards for your recycled technology. If you’re getting rid of old Xbox or Playstation games, you might be able to exchange them for a gift card to buy new games.

For more information, see How to more safely dispose of computers and other devices. If you just want to upgrade your operating system, find out if your current computer can run Windows 8.1 and you might not even need to get rid of it.

Security improvements in Windows 8

April 15th, 2014 No comments

Support ended for Windows XP last week. That means technical assistance for Windows XP is no longer available.

To stay protected, you can upgrade your current computer or buy a new one. Windows 8.1 Update runs on a wider variety of devices, so you’ll have more to choose from, including budget-friendly laptops and tablets.

Windows 8 security and safety features

Windows Update installs important updates as they become available. Windows 8 turns on automatic updating as part of the initial setup process. Keep in mind that Windows Update won’t add any applications to your computer without asking for your permission. Get more answers to your Windows Update questions.

Help keep your family safer. With Windows 8, you can monitor your children’s Internet use, choose which games or apps they can access, and block or allow access to certain websites. Keep track of your kids online.

Antivirus protection is now included for your PC. Windows Defender, which is built in to Windows 8, replaces Microsoft Security Essentials. It runs in the background and notifies you when you need to take specific action.

Learn about other ways to keep your PC safer from viruses with Windows 8

Buying a new PC? Save $100 when you buy any Surface Pro 2 or select PCs over $599

Get the latest security updates and find out what to do if your computer is running Windows XP

April 8th, 2014 No comments

Microsoft releases security updates on the second Tuesday of every month.

Support for Windows XP has ended

Microsoft has provided support for Windows XP for the past 12 years. But the time has come for us, along with our hardware and software partners, to invest our resources toward supporting more recent technologies so that we can continue to deliver great new experiences.

As a result, technical assistance for Windows XP will no longer be available, including automatic updates that help protect your PC. Microsoft will also stop providing Microsoft Security Essentials for download on Windows XP on this date. (If you already have Microsoft Security Essentials installed, you will continue to receive antimalware signature updates for a limited time, but this does not mean that your PC will be secure because Microsoft will no longer provide security updates to help protect your PC.)

More information

How to get rid of malware that keeps coming back

March 27th, 2014 No comments

Windows Defender and Microsoft Security Essentials can get rid of most malware, but here’s what you can do if it comes back.

  1. Make sure you have automatic updating turned on. This feature ensures that you have the latest security improvements from Microsoft installed on your computer. If you’re using other antivirus software, make sure that it is up to date with the latest malware definitions.
  1. Restart your PC.
  2. Run a full scan:
    1. Open your Microsoft security software.
    2. On the Home tab, under Scan options, click Full.
    3. Click Scan now.

 A full scan can take an hour or more, depending on how many files you have on your PC.

Get more advanced troubleshooting for malware that keeps coming back.

Once your computer is clean, take these steps to help keep it clean.

How to recover an account if you haven’t already added security information to it

March 25th, 2014 No comments

A reader asks:

What can I do if my account has been hacked and I haven’t already added security information to it?

It would be easier to recover your account if you had already associated it with information that cybercriminals can’t easily access, like your mobile phone number or an alternate email address. For example, if your account is compromised, Microsoft could send you an account-recapture code in a text message to help you regain access to your account. If you do have access to your account, add security information to your account now.

If you haven’t already added security information to your account 

Scan your PC for viruses

 If your account has been hacked and you can’t get access to it, the first thing you should do is scan your computer for viruses. Do this before you try to change your password. Hackers get your password through malware that’s been installed on your PC without your knowledge (for example, when you download a new screen saver, toolbar, or other software from an untrustworthy source.) It’s important to clear your PC of viruses or malware before you change your password. That way, the hackers won’t get your new password.

If your computer is running Windows 8

Use the built-in Windows Defender to help you get rid of a virus or other malware.

Here’s how: 

  1. From the Search charm, search for defender, and then open Windows Defender.

  2. On the Home tab, choose a scan option, and then tap or click Scan now.

In addition to the color codes for your PC’s overall security status, Windows Defender applies an alert level to any suspected malware it detects. You can decide whether to remove an item entirely, research it further, or let it run because you recognize it.

 If your computer is running Windows 7 or Windows Vista 

Get more help removing viruses

Reset your password

Once you’ve scanned your computer for viruses, reset the password on your account.

If you can’t reset your password, and you haven’t already added security information to your account, you can still get back into the account by filling out a questionnaire. You will be asked specific questions about the account and email messages that might be stored there. Someone will get back to you within 24 hours (typically a lot sooner).

For more information, see How to recover your hacked Microsoft account.