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Archive for April, 2009

Running the Windows Home Server Console on a MAC

April 30th, 2009 No comments

One of the developers on the Windows Home Server team, Gautam, was goofing around on a Mac during his off hours and put together this awesome set of instructions and screenshots for running the Windows Home Server Console on a Mac. 

This article describes how to configure your Mac to be able to get the Home Server Console on it. You will need to Download and Install Remote Desktop Connection Client for Mac.

If you already have it installed, you can skip to Configure it to Connect to your Windows Home Server Console

Download and Install Remote Desktop Connection Client for Mac

1. On your Mac, go to the Remote Desktop Connection Client for Mac website [microsoft.com].

2. Click on Download Remote Desktop Connection Client 2.

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3. On the bottom right side of the page, in the Details section, scroll all the way down.

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4. Click on your preferred language to start the download.

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5. Once the file downloads, the Remote Desktop Connection Wizard should open up. Step through the wizard.

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6. Eject the Remote Desktop Connection by right clicking on the icon on your desktop.

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7. Great! Now you are ready to configure the Remote Desktop Connection Client to connect to your Home Server.

Configure the Remote Desktop Connection Client 2 for Mac to connect to the Windows Home Server Console

1. Open Finder. Click Applications in left menu. Click Remote Desktop Connection.

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2. Type in the name of your Home Server.

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3. In the File menu, click on Save As. Save your file. It’s easiest to save it on the Desktop.

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4. Go back to the File menu and click on Edit Connection. Select the file you saved in the last step.

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5. In the Login tab type –

a. User name: Administrator

b. Password: Your home server password.

c. Domain: Name of your home server.

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6. In the Display tab, change the Colors to Millions.

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7. In the Applications tab, make sure Start only the following Windows-based application when you log in to the remote computer is checked and type the following for Application path and file name: C:\Program Files\Windows Home Server\HomeServerConsole.exe /b

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8. In the Security tab, select Always connect, even if authentication fails.

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9. In the File menu, click on Save.

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10. Now, right click on your recently saved file, click Open With, click Other…, scroll down and select TextEdit. Click on Open.

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11. Change the number below DesktopHeight to 675 and number below DesktopWidth to 992.

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12. Save the file and close it.

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13. Now, click on the file you just saved to connect to the home server!
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14. If you are unable to connect try connecting using your IP address of the home server.
To find your home server’s IP address, log on to the console from another computer. Go to Settings, Remote Access, Router Details

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Open the file like in the above step and change the connection string to the IP address. For most of you it should be something like 192.XXX.X.XXX

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Who Gets Windows Security Updates?

April 28th, 2009 No comments

RSA was great last week – security was clearly top of mind for the attendees, and I fielded a number of different questions last week about how Microsoft protects our customers. Some are pretty straightforward around how the various Windows 7 security technologies work, but many have focused on how we actually deliver protection to customers on an ongoing basis.

One question that comes up more than I would have ever expected is: Who gets security updates?

There seems to be a myth that Microsoft limits security updates to genuine Windows users.

Let me be clear: all security updates go to all users.

Not only do all security updates go to all users’ systems, but non-genuine Windows systems are able to install service packs, update rollups, and important reliability and application compatibility updates. In addition, the users of non-genuine Windows systems can also upgrade a lot of the other software on their computer. For example Internet Explorer 8 has numerous security- oriented features and improvements, and it is available to all users.

This isn’t to say that all updates are available to non-genuine PCs. Other value-adding updates and software may or may not be blocked, at Microsoft’s discretion. On Windows Vista, available updates can be accessed through the Windows Update control panel. On Windows XP, a non-genuine Windows system can access updates through Automatic Updates, but they cannot get to any of the optional updates which are only available through the Windows Update and Microsoft Update websites.

Keeping a machine up to date is one of the first steps in helping ensure that they remain reliable, compatible, and safe from threats when they are online. Some of the most famous incidents of malicious software infection have come after security updates were publicly available from Microsoft – Blaster, Zotob, Conficker and Sasser, just to name a few.

I hope this clears up some confusion. Rest assured that we at Microsoft are committed to making sure that security updates are available to all of our users to help ensure a safe online experience for everyone.

Categories: security, windows update Tags:

Business Ready Security and Windows 7

April 24th, 2009 No comments

Here’s the last of the security stories from the RSA show floor. To wrap things up we asked John (JG) Chirapurath (Director, Identity & Security Business Group) to give us a quick rundown on Microsoft Forefront for Business Ready Security and how it fits in with Windows 7.


A Look at Microsoft Forefront

Internet Explorer 8 Security

April 24th, 2009 No comments

Here is another story from a Microsoft Program Manger discussing their favorite things in Windows 7. This time it is Eric Lawrence (Senior Program Manager on the Internet Explorer Team) to talk about his favorite security features in Internet Explorer 8, the browser that ships in Windows 7.


Eric Lawrence Discusses His Favorite Internet Explorer Security Features

Categories: Internet Explorer 8, RSA, security, Windows 7 Tags:

The Kerberos Contraint Delegation fix and a 8197 Event for MSExchangeFBPublish

This is a blog entry for Exchange 2003, which is meanwhile in Extended Support (which means, that we will deliver non-security Hotfixes only to customers with a custom support agreement. In December 2006 we released a Hotfix for OWA Smart Card Authentication in Exchange 2003 over Exchange 2003 Front End Servers and ISA Server. It uses Kerberos Contrained Delegation ((also called KCD) and reuses mixed Mode AD properties in the Configuration Container of the AD, mainly the attributes msExchLegacyAccount, msExchLegacyDomain and msExchLegacyPW. In a mixed mode Exchange 5.5 / Exchange 200x environment these attributes contain all the relevant details for the Exchange Service Account, which was needed for an Exchange 5.5 site. Ca. mid 2007 a large customer of us had a CritSit, after he deployed this Hotfix for Smartcard Authentication concerning Exchange ActiveSync. (A CritSit is a Severity “A” Situation for our Premier customers, where we offer some special support steps like rapid Onsite, Escalation Services Support and special management awareness).  Not immediately after the KCD Hotfix, but after a while and users started complaining, that booking resources was giving errors. When end users looked up the Free/Busy of the resources – it looked like, that they were free, but after they invited them, they got a message, that the resources were already booked. What was wrong?  As we found out after a while, the problem was with his implementation of the Auto Accept Agent and our implementation of the Smartcard Auth for OWA fix. The Auto Accept Agent, like OWA, registers its Free/Busy times (which is an entry in public system folder, namely the Free/Busy Folder over a component which is called madfb and logs events under the name of MSEXchangeFBPublish. MADFB logged 8197 Events. The community links this event normally to the following: http://www.eventid.net/display.asp?eventid=8197&eventno=840&source=MSExchangeFBPublish&phase=1. Well, as we understood in that CritSit, it can also be due to Hotfix KB 920209. Why? Well the MADFB runs under the Account of the local Server, until…. yes, until it finds an msExchLegacyAccount. If there is one, than it uses this account to log onto the System Attendant mailbox (the SA mailbox) to push and calculate the Free/busy entry there after it than goes out to the Public store, where the relevant Free/Busy Folder is located. If the account does not have permissions to the SA mailbox or to the pub store, we cannot publish Free/Busy. So the calendar entry for the resource or user mailbox is there, but the Free/Busy entry is wrong, stays with the old information. If meanwhile any Outlook version comes along and logs on to the mailbox, than the Free/Busy entry gets updated via the Outlook mechanism (which has a Sniffer for calendar entries and a local (hidden) Free/Busy Folder, which it synchronizes regularly every 15 Minutes with the Free/Busy public folder. So the Outlook process for Free/Busy Publishing in Exchange 2003 is different from the OWA or AAA or any other custom Free/Busy publishing mechanism, which also uses the MADFB process. Outlook Free/Busy Publishing can fix the broken OWA or AAA Free/Busy publishing. But for resource mailboxes the following is true – probably nobody logs on via Outlook and the Free/Busy entries can get stale in that situation.
Why the Hotfix KB 920209 once more populates the msExchLegacyAccount and the other 2 attributes. Well – it is the so called KCD service account, which you need to enter into the OWA FE configuration after you install the Hotfix. But what is the KCD service Account for. Our KB article does not explain this, so let me do it here. This account is not the account which is used for constrained delegation – it is the account which looks up the environment periodically, if there are other new Front End Servers, which are also to be enabled for Kerberos Constraint Delegation and moreover – for the sheer enabling of the Constraint delegation you need an account under which that is done. So in the fix process the colleagues, who wrote the Hotfix, decided to reutilize these 3 attributes.
How you can fix the situation with the installed Hotfix and the need to publish Free/Busy over the madfb process?
You have 2 methods:
1) Clean out the msExchLegacyAccount and the other attributes, after you have enabled the delegation. Delegation will continue to work after that, because in the process of following the instructions of Hotfix KB 920209 you already enabled Kerberos Contrained Delegation. What is really used in the daily Process of Constrained delegation are the Service Principal Names associated with the relevant computer accounts. The process of cleaning that attribute is described under the exbpa article for the msExchLegacyAccount. As a side note; the statement in the exbpa article: “This attribute is only used in mixed mode Exchange organizations where Exchange Server 5.5 is still present.” is not completely correct. With the setup of the Hotfix KB 920209 we also can get a msExchLegacyAccount in a native Mode Administrative Group.
2) The second approach would be to give the KCD service account appropriate permissions to the SA mailboxes and the public stores with the Free/Busy Folder. In that situation Free/Busy Publishing would also succeed and so you can leave that KCD account in that attribute.
Another side note: Sometimes the password of that KCD Service Account can expire or was reset or whatever – and nobody changes it via the Interface from the Hotfix. Well – than you also will get 8197 events and all the follow-up.
Why I wrote this? Last week we had another customer with 8197 events and Hotfix KB 920209. A colleague of mine digged out my dealing with that 2007 CritSit, where I had opened an internal request for collaboration and we even had thought about another Hotfix (which would have changed the behavior of the MADFB process – why after all it still uses the msExchLegacyAccount in a native Admin Group). But the Hotfix proposal was never written, because no Hotfix was requested and I missed to engage someone to update at least the KB article for Hotfix KB 920209.  Sorry for that. So this blog post shall be an amendment for KB 920209 and for the exbpa article concerning the msExchLegacyAccount 

Steve Riley on Windows 7 Security

April 23rd, 2009 No comments

While walking the show floor here at RSA, I ran into Steve Riley, who’s an incredibly passionate and knowledgeable Security Evangelist (or officially “Senior Technical Evangelist”) in Microsoft’s Trustworthy Computing organization. He’s a well respected and sought out speaker on security topics. So I thought it would be great to get Steve’s take on his favorite two security features in Windows 7. Take a look at what Steve has to say about Windows 7 security!


Steve Riley discusses Windows 7 Security Features at RSA

AppLocker: Direct from RSA

April 22nd, 2009 No comments

The buzz at RSA around Windows 7 has been tremendous.

Yesterday, in his keynote, Scott Charney (Corporate VP Trustworthy Computing) talked about AppLocker and how it helps ensure that only known, trusted software is run within an organization’s desktop environment. Shortly after the keynote, I ran into Marcelo Birnbach – a Senior Program Manager in the Windows Security Technologies organization and works on AppLocker – on the expo floor. Since he’s an expert, we thought we would ask him for his perspective on AppLocker in Windows 7.


Marcelo Birnbach talks about Windows 7’s AppLocker Feature

And since Marcelo is originally from Argentina, we also asked him to share his thoughts in Spanish.


Marcelo Birnbach talks about Windows 7’s AppLocker Feature [Spanish Version]

Categories: AppLocker, RSA, Windows 7, Windows Security Tags:

End to End Trust and Windows 7

April 21st, 2009 No comments

I attended Scott Charney’s keynote this morning at RSA – Moving Towards End to End Trust: A Collaborative Effort. I would assume that many of the readers of this blog are not familiar with the End to End Trust story. In a nutshell, End to End trust is Microsoft’s vision for creating a safer, more trusted Internet. It’s a great vision, but it’s also a big job that requires a commitment and focus on the fundamentals—fundamentals that will help deliver the most secure and privacy-enhanced versions of software and services that we have ever delivered. We’re also not going it alone. End to End Trust requires broad collaboration within the industry and Microsoft will continue to share our best practices with the IT communities of our customers.

Scott talked about how hard we are working across Microsoft to deliver technology innovations that move the needle towards a trusted stack, with security rooted in hardware and an identity metasystem (a big word that means a way of trusting people are who they say they are on the Internet). Even with progress, people still need strong defense in depth security technologies and Scott talked about how Microsoft’s Identity and Security Division is delivering integrated identity and security business solutions today to our customers. But maybe the most interesting thing he touched on was how technology innovations alone are not enough. Innovation also needs to align with political, economic and IT forces to enable the change that is truly needed.

End to End trust is a vision of what’s possible if we collectively work together, and it can help address real world problems that people face every day such as ID theft, online fraud and child safety. If you want to learn more about End to End Trust, visit http://www.microsoft.com/endtoendtrust to find out the entire story.

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Now, let’s talk about Windows 7 and the progress we’re making to deliver End to End Trust in the Windows platform. In my blog post yesterday on how Windows 7 helps enable the mobile workforce, I wrote about technologies like DirectAccess, BitLocker To Go, and AppLocker. Each of these technologies plays a part in helping us enable End to End Trust, whether it is strong machine and user authentication with DirectAccess or limiting running software on a system to known, trusted applications with AppLocker. But there are other technologies that help us as well:

Biometric Framework
Fingerprint scanners are becoming more and more common in standard laptop configurations—my laptop came standard with one. Windows 7 helps ensure that fingerprint readers work well and that they are easy to set up and use. This is accomplished by taking the common code that everyone needs to write and standardizing it in the platform so that biometric hardware vendors can concentrate on the code they need to write to make their device work and not have to worry about how it ties into Windows. This new framework makes logging on to Windows using a fingerprint more reliable across different hardware providers and makes fingerprint reader configurations are easy to modify. This puts the user in control of how they log on to Windows 7 and manage the fingerprint data stored on their PC.

Improved Smart Card Support
Password-based authentication has well-understood security limitations; however, deploying strong authentication technologies like smart cards remains a challenge for many. Windows 7 enhances the smart card infrastructure advances made in Windows Vista through support of Plug and Play. This eases deployment of smart card infrastructures because drivers for both smart cards and smart card readers are automatically installed, without the need for administrative permissions or user interaction. I think this new behavior is going to ease the deployment of strong, two-factor authentication for many organizations.

BitLocker
I’m a big fan of BitLocker, it helps prevent a thief who boots another operating system or runs a software hacking tool from breaking into my laptop if they happen to get a hold of it. This holds true for both the operating system volume (C: drive) and my data volume (D: drive). Most customers I talk to love the encryption protection that BitLocker provides, but many are not aware that BitLocker also does integrity checking of early boot components to help ensure that the system has not been tampered with and that the encrypted drive has not been swapped out to another computer. This integrity checking ties back into the “security rooted in hardware” that is a part of End to End Trust. This integrity checking utilizes a Trusted Platform Module (a smart card like chip on the system motherboard) to help protect the encryption keys utilized by BitLocker. This is true for BitLocker in Windows 7 as well as Windows Vista.

We’ve also listened to feedback and made enhancements to Windows 7 BitLocker to provide a better experience for IT Pros and for end users. One of the simple enhancements we made is to right-click enable the BitLocker protection of a disk volume. Now I can go to Windows Explorer and right click any disk volume, including my removable BitLocker To Go volumes, and encrypt them right there without having to go to the Control Panel.

Another big change was the addition of Data Recovery Agent (DRA) support for all protected volumes. The DRA is a certificate-based data recovery agent that can be utilized to recover the contents of any BitLocker protected volume. Since the group policy settings are separate for Operating System Drives, Fixed Data Drives, and Removable Data Drives, customers have flexibility in how they want to configure their recovery options for the different threats that each separate drive type may experience.

With BitLocker and BitLocker To Go, enterprises can rest assured that their information and data is secure, no matter where their employees are working. I know I feel better knowing my laptop and all of my USB sticks are protected!

Internet Explorer 8

I know folks are more concerned than ever about protecting themselves while online, particularly form identity theft, malware, and other potentially dangerous online threats. I feel like we have done a lot in the platform and the security technologies we have been talking about this week (Firewall, DirectAccess, BitLocker To Go and AppLocker) are a part of the protection equation. But Internet Explorer 8 is also another huge piece of the equation as users spend more time online, in their browsers. IE 8 is the most secure web browser on the market and provides another, vital layer of defense against online threats.

We built upon the phishing protection in Internet Explorer 7 with the SmartScreen Filter, which now adds protection from malware – a threat that is growing significantly faster than phishing.

We also built in support for protecting users against type-1 (or “reflection) Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) attacks. XSS threats try to exploit vulnerabilities in the websites we visit and are quickly becoming one of the most prevalent ways web sites can be compromised. The bad news for you and I is that an XSS attack can help a bad guy steal our usernames and passwords for our online bank accounts or other confidential information. The XSS filter in IE 8 uses heuristics to detect such attacks and, when they are detected, prevent their execution. This should help you and I safe from the most common form of XSS attacks in use today.

Another innovation concerns ClickJacking. While a lot or people have heard of phishing attacks, a new kind of phishing attack called ClickJacking is on the rise. ClickJacking occurs where an attacker’s web page deceives a person into clicking on content from another website without realizing it – so they’re clicking on something that, for instance, buys something from the site, changes settings on their browser, or provides advertisements that these cybercriminals get paid for. ClickJacking Protection in IE is a feature that allows Web site content owners to put a tag in a page header that will help prevent ClickJacking.

I think the IE team has done a great job with the security in IE 8 and love that it puts people in control of their safety and privacy and helps protect them from new online threats. For those of you who are interested, there is a lot more security goodness in IE 8 on the IE blog and via these links:

Got To Run

I feel great about Windows 7 and the security enhancements we have been able to make. Hopefully as you learn more about the security work that we have put into it, you will reach the same conclusion that I have: Windows 7 is the most robust platform we have ever delivered, it helps support End to End trust, helps keep you and I safe, and was designed to prevent malware from getting onto our PCs to begin with.

There is a lot going on here at RSA and I want to go spend some more time seeing what’s new and exciting. I’ll be back with some of my impressions of RSA in a bit.

Microsoft Exchange Web Services Managed API 1.0 Beta released

Yesterday the Exchange DEV Team announced the Release of the EWS Managed API Beta. Some basic documentation is available at the the MSDN Site for the Microsoft Exchange Web Services Managed API 1.0 Beta SDK April 2009. The main object of the API is the ExchangeService. In the Getting started section You can see a basic code example for sending an email. In the future we will hopefully see some more samples and interesting results for working with the new API. David Claux has written an introductory article for the classes and methods.

Currently I work on a customer workshop for an Introduction to Exchange Web Services and IT operational aspects (Troubleshooting, monitoring and the like) of them. So I thought, that the below very short and loose linklist can be benefitial (links open in new window):

 







  1. The Vista EWS Gadget (Download Link) – You can see Your inbox, calendar, tasks and read them.




  2. The Exchange Developer Center (You can use this as a starting link)


  3. The Exchange DEV Team Blog, already mentioned before (This is an alternative starting point.) 


  4. The book “Inside Microsoft Exchange 2007 Web Services” about EWS, which is currently probably the book about EWS


  5. Glens Exchange DEV Blog – Glen has written a helper class DLL EWSUTIL, which You can reference in Powershell for various things – Glen has samples for OWA modification, contacts, finding unused mailboxes, postings to Twitter etc. – go and have a look)


  6. MVP Henning Krauses blog (Henning maintains a project for simplyfying Exchange Push Notifications, where You get informed about what is going on in a folder and recently wrote a lot about EWS with interesting samples) .

Enjoy !

Microsoft Security Advisory (968272): Vulnerability in Microsoft Office Excel Could Allow Remote Code Execution – Version: 3.0

Revision Note: V3.0 (April 14, 2009) Advisory updated to reflect publication of security bulletin.
Summary: Microsoft is investigating new public reports of a vulnerability in Microsoft Office Excel that could allow remote code execution if a user opens a specially crafted Excel file. At this time, we are aware only of limited and targeted attacks that attempt to use this vulnerability.

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Microsoft Security Advisory (953818): Blended Threat from Combined Attack Using Apple’s Safari on the Windows Platform – Version: 2.0

Revision Note: V2.0 (April 14, 2009): Added references and links to MS09-014 and MS09-015, which address the issue in this advisory.
Summary: Microsoft has investigated public reports of a blended threat that allows remote code execution on all supported versions of Windows XP and Windows Vista when Apple’s Safari for Windows has been installed. Safari is not installed with Windows XP or Windows Vista by default; it must be installed independently or through the Apple Software Update application. Customers running Safari on Windows should review this advisory.

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Microsoft Security Advisory (960906): Vulnerability in WordPad Text Converter Could Allow Remote Code Execution – Version: 2.0

Revision Note: V2.0 (April 14, 2009): Advisory updated to reflect publication of security bulletin.
Summary: Microsoft is investigating new reports of a vulnerability in the WordPad Text Converter for Word 97 files on Windows 2000 Service Pack 4, Windows XP Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1, and Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2. Windows XP Service Pack 3, Windows Vista, and Windows Server 2008 are not affected as these operating systems do not contain the vulnerable code.

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Microsoft Security Advisory (951306): Vulnerability in Windows Could Allow Elevation of Privilege – Version: 3.0

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Microsoft Security Advisory (960906): Vulnerability in WordPad Text Converter Could Allow Remote Code Execution – 4/14/2009

April 14th, 2009 Comments off

Revision Note: V2.0 (April 14, 2009): Advisory updated to reflect publication of security bulletin. Advisory Summary:Microsoft is investigating new reports of a vulnerability in the WordPad Text Converter for Word 97 files on Windows 2000 Service Pack 4, Windows XP Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1, and Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2. Windows XP Service Pack 3, Windows Vista, and Windows Server 2008 are not affected as these operating systems do not contain the vulnerable code.

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Microsoft Security Advisory (953818): Blended Threat from Combined Attack Using Apple’s Safari on the Windows Platform – 4/14/2009

April 14th, 2009 Comments off

Revision Note: V2.0 (April 14, 2009): Added references and links to MS09-014 and MS09-015, which address the issue in this advisory. Advisory Summary:Microsoft has investigated public reports of a blended threat that allows remote code execution on all supported versions of Windows XP and Windows Vista when Apple’s Safari for Windows has been installed. Safari is not installed with Windows XP or Windows Vista by default; it must be installed independently or through the Apple Software Update application. Customers running Safari on Windows should review this advisory.

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Microsoft Security Advisory (951306): Vulnerability in Windows Could Allow Elevation of Privilege – 4/14/2009

April 14th, 2009 Comments off
Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Microsoft Security Advisory (968272): Vulnerability in Microsoft Office Excel Could Allow Remote Code Execution – 4/14/2009

April 14th, 2009 Comments off

Revision Note: V3.0 (April 14, 2009) Advisory updated to reflect publication of security bulletin. Advisory Summary:Microsoft is investigating new public reports of a vulnerability in Microsoft Office Excel that could allow remote code execution if a user opens a specially crafted Excel file. At this time, we are aware only of limited and targeted attacks that attempt to use this vulnerability.

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Windows Home Server – Canadians Put More Importance on Photos Stored On Their PC Than Their Financial Information

April 10th, 2009 No comments

Last month, Microsoft Canada reported survey results by Ipsos Reid that found Canadians value personal information but aren’t taking measures to keep it secure.  Zibb.com and a few other online outlets picked up the story.  Read it here.

Sadly, 55% of respondents said that they have actually lost important files from their PC.  Faced with this disheartening prospect, women were more likely to feel devastated or like crying (22%) and, the majority of women (51%), claimed they would pay $100 dollars to retrieve lost or damaged photos from their PC.

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“It’s clear that for Canadians the PC is much more than just a workstation, there is an emotionally attachment to items stored on their PCs – like photos, music and financial documents—but it’s also clear that the majority of Canadians put those items at risk every day.”  Barry Zeidenberg, Director – Retail Marketing, Microsoft Canada

– Steven

Categories: Backup, Data Recovery, Protect Tags:

Windows Home Server MVPs – April 2009

The Windows Home Server team is excited to have 2 new MVPs added to our MVP family.  Please join me in welcoming our latest additions:



I look forward to their continued contributions to the Windows Home Server Community.


-Jonas

New blog for the Windows Server User Assistance Networking writing team

April 7th, 2009 No comments

There is a new blog being published by the Windows Server User Assistance Networking (WSUAN) writing team:


http://blogs.technet.com/wsnetdoc/default.aspx


The IT Pro and Developer writers on the WSUAN writing team are using this blog to describe the improvements that they are making to networking documentation for Windows Server and to share technical tips and tricks.


Check it out.


The NAP Product Team 

Categories: Resources Tags: