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5 safety tips for online dating

February 13th, 2014 No comments

If you’re going to be connecting online this Valentine’s Day (or ever), follow these safety and privacy tips.

  1. Avoid catfishing. This is a type of social engineering designed to entice you into a relationship in order to steal your personal information, your money, or both. Always remember that people on the other end of online conversations might not be who they say they are. Treat all email and social networking messages with caution when they come from someone you don’t know.
  2.  Use online dating websites you trust. Knowing when to trust a website depends in part on who publishes it, what information they want, and what you want from the site. Before you sign up on a site, read the privacy policy. Can’t find it? Find another site. For more information, see How do I know if I can trust a website?
  3.  Be careful with the information you post on online. Before you put anything on a social networking site, personal website, or dating profile, think about what you are posting, who you are sharing it with, and how this will reflect on your online reputation. For more information, watch this video about the dangers of oversharing.
  4.  Be smart about details in photographs. Photographs can reveal a lot of personal information, including identifiable details such as street signs, house numbers, or your car’s license plate. Photographs can also reveal location information. For more information, see Use location services more safely.
  5.  Block and report suspicious people. Use the tools in your email, social networking program, or dating website to block and report unwanted contact. Read this if you think you might already be a victim of a scam.

Catfishing: Are you falling for it?

June 20th, 2013 No comments

The news is filled with stories about people, famous and otherwise, getting caught in online dating scams. The phenomenon is so common that it now has a name: Catfishing. The term catfishing comes from the 2010 movie Catfish about a man who was lured into a relationship by a scammer who was using a fake social networking profile.

Catfishing is a kind of social engineering. It’s similar to messages that claim that your computer has a virus, that you’ve won a lottery, or that you can earn money for little or no effort on your part. All of these scams are designed to “hook” you with fear, vanity, and too-good-to-be-true offers. The cybercriminal in a catfishing scam might post fake pictures or send encouraging messages to entice you into a relationship, but the goal is the same as in other scams: The scammer wants to steal your personal information, your money, or both.

3 ways to help avoid catfishing

  • Always remember that people on the other end of online conversations might not be who they say they are. Treat all emails and social networking messages with caution when they come from someone you don’t know.
  • Never share your passwords, even with someone you trust. If you think your accounts have been compromised, change your passwords as soon as possible.
  • If you suspect that someone is catfishing you, report them.

For more general tips and advice on how to avoid scams, download our free 12-page booklet, Online Fraud: Your Guide to Prevention, Detection, and Recovery (PDF file, 2.33 MB), and browse our other resources on how to protect yourself online.