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Archive for the ‘smartphone’ Category

Is your child graduating to a new digital device?

May 27th, 2014 No comments

Its graduation time, and smartphones, tablets, gaming consoles, and laptops are tops on many kids’ wish lists. Whether your child is graduating from preschool or college, it’s never too late to talk with them about online safety before you hand over the new device.

  • Set clear rules for young children about who they can talk to, text, or play games with.
  • With older kids, discuss online bullying, sexting, and the dangers of using a phone while driving.
  • Have kids lock all devices and accounts with a PIN or strong password, and remind them to keep their passwords secret—even from best friends.
  • Talk to kids about limiting the personal information they share to close friends only.
  • Consider disabling the location services on your young child’s devices; at the very least, turn it off for any camera.
  • Teach tweens and teens to use location-based services cautiously.

For more guidelines on kids and online safety, see Digital gift-giving checklist, and download a printable version of the checklist (PDF, 186 KB).

Is your child graduating to a new digital device?

May 27th, 2014 No comments

Its graduation time, and smartphones, tablets, gaming consoles, and laptops are tops on many kids’ wish lists. Whether your child is graduating from preschool or college, it’s never too late to talk with them about online safety before you hand over the new device.

  • Set clear rules for young children about who they can talk to, text, or play games with.
  • With older kids, discuss online bullying, sexting, and the dangers of using a phone while driving.
  • Have kids lock all devices and accounts with a PIN or strong password, and remind them to keep their passwords secret—even from best friends.
  • Talk to kids about limiting the personal information they share to close friends only.
  • Consider disabling the location services on your young child’s devices; at the very least, turn it off for any camera.
  • Teach tweens and teens to use location-based services cautiously.

For more guidelines on kids and online safety, see Digital gift-giving checklist, and download a printable version of the checklist (PDF, 186 KB).

Top 5 online safety tips for summer

June 4th, 2013 No comments

To help stay safe on your travels this summer, we recommend these Internet safety and privacy tips.

  1. Make sure your laptop or tablet has up-to-date antivirus and antispyware software installed. Windows 8 includes antivirus protection that’s turned on by default. If your computer isn’t running Windows 8, you can download Microsoft Security Essentials for free.
  2. Don’t broadcast vacation plans on your social networking site. If you’re leaving your house unoccupied and at risk for potential burglary, take a few minutes to adjust settings for sharing your location on your social networking site and any apps on your smart phone. If you have kids who go online, make sure they know this, too. For more information, see Use location services more safely.
  3. Lock your mobile phone. Use a four-digit PIN, or a password option, if you have it. Keep it secret. Use our password checker to test your password strength. Also, if you don’t need to store sensitive information on your phone, don’t. Learn more ways to secure your smartphone or learn about the Windows Phone privacy settings.
  4. Avoid typing sensitive information on your laptop using an unsecured wireless connection. If possible, save your financial transactions for a secured home connection. Passwords, credit card numbers, or other financial information are less secure on a public network. If you must enter credit card numbers while using a public network, make sure you see a locked padlock icon in the corner of the browser window and make sure the web address begins with HTTPS (the “S” stands for secure). Get more safety tips for using Wi-Fi.
  5. Your friend probably didn’t just get robbed in a foreign country. If you get an email from a friend who needs you to send him money while he’s on his vacation, be suspicious. A scammer can take over (or hijack) an email account and send an email to you that looks like it’s from someone on your contact list. Find a different way to try to contact your friend to find out if this email really came from him. With Outlook.com (formerly Hotmail), you can now report a friend who you think has been scammed, even if that friend doesn’t use Outlook.com. For more information, see Security features in Outlook.com.

Mobile phone manners and safety habits

May 30th, 2013 No comments

Last month we asked you to tell us your mobile phone pet peeves. The results are in, and 44 percent of you listed “constant phone checking” as one of the most annoying behavior among your smartphone-wielding friends.

See the rest of the results

Bad manners on your smartphone isn’t just annoying, it can also compromise your privacy and safety.

Men vs. Women

Although 39 percent of pollsters believe that men and women have equally safe phone safety habits, this is not the case according to our Microsoft Computing Safety Index results released earlier this year.  Sorry ladies, but men are better at locking their phones with a password, using secure wireless networks, and installing updates. Or at least that’s what they claim.

Find out how women are more selective with the personal information they share on their phone

Our results didn’t just divide people by gender—we found those 40 and older were much less likely to lose their phones. Men and women were equally likely to lose their phones.

Didn’t get a chance to participate in our mobile manners & mayhem poll? You still can.

More resources:

We know where you are: Geolocation security tips

June 21st, 2011 No comments

You can use your smartphone and location services (also known as “geolocation”) to post information about where you are at any given time. But before you use geolocation, you might want to consider these safety tips:

  • Share your location only with people you trust. For example, in a service like Facebook Places, create a separate list of your closest friends. Use privacy controls to restrict access to location status updates, messages, and photos to those people who are on your list.
  • Disable the option that allows others to share your location.
  • Set your location data so that it’s not publicly available or searchable.

For more information about the risks and rewards of using geolocation, see Use location services more safely.