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New Azure DevOps Work Item Experience in Visual Studio 2019

December 12th, 2018 No comments

In previous versions of Visual Studio, the work item experience was centered around queries, which need to be created and managed to find the right work items. In Visual Studio 2019, we have removed queries and added a new view for work items centered at the developer. This allows the developer to quickly find the work they need and associate them to their pending changes. Removing the need for queries.

For those users who use Visual Studio for work item planning and triage, we encourage you to do so from Azure Boards. Azure Boards is the central place to manage your backlog, triage work, and plan your sprints.

Be sure to read the full documentation on how to use the new Azure Boards work item experience in Visual Studio 2019.

Work Items Hub

The Work Items Hub in Visual Studio 2019 has many of the same views found in the Work Items Hub in Azure Boards. It is where developers can quickly find the work items that are important to them. Filters and views can provide specific lists of work items such as Assigned to Me, Following, Mentioned, and My Activity. From any these views you can do quick do inline edits, assign work, create branches, and associate work to pending changes.

Create branches and relate work

Create a branch directly from a work item. This will automatically associate that work item to any current changes. Alternatively, you can relate a work item to a current set of changes already in progress. You can associate as many work items to a commit as you would like.

#Mention in commit message

Search and select work items directly from the commit message. Associate as many work items to the commit as you would like.

We need your help

We want to make the best experience for developers who use Azure Boards in Visual Studio. Please provide your feedback by sending us bugs and suggestions. You can contact us on Twitter at @danhellem or @AzureDevOps..

Dan Hellem, Program Manager, Azure DevOps
@danhellem

Dan is a Program Manager with Microsoft’s Azure DevOps on the Azure Boards team. Before coming to Microsoft in 2012, Dan spent his career building applications using Microsoft technologies and assembling Agile teams centered on delivering high quality software to users.

Making every developer more productive with Visual Studio 2019

December 4th, 2018 No comments

Today, in the Microsoft Connect(); 2018 keynote, Scott Guthrie announced the availability of Visual Studio 2019 Preview 1. This is the first preview of the next major version of Visual Studio. In this Preview, we’ve focused on a few key areas, such as making it faster to open and work with projects stored in git repositories, improving IntelliSense with Artificial Intelligence (AI) (a feature we call Visual Studio IntelliCode), and making it easier to collaborate with your teammates by integrating Live Share. With each preview, we’ll be adding capabilities, improving performance, and refining the user experience, and we absolutely want your feedback.

For a quick overview of the new functionality, you can keep reading this blog, or if you want a video overview, check out our team member Allison’s introduction to Visual Studio 2019. But before you do either, make sure to kick off the download.

Enabling you to focus on your work

Right off the bat, you’ll notice that Visual Studio 2019 opens with a new start window on launch. This experience is better designed to work with today’s Git repositories – whether local repos or online Git repos on GitHub, Azure Repos, or elsewhere. Of course, you can still open an existing project or solution or create a new one. (This experience is also coming soon to Visual Studio 2019 for Mac.) We’ll have a more detailed blog post on the new start window experience next week, which will also go into some of the research that supported this revamp.

Visual Studio 2019 start window

Visual Studio 2019 for Mac start window

Once you’re in the IDE, you’ll notice a few changes to the UI and UX of Visual Studio 2019. Jamie Young recently published a blog post with more detail on these changes, but to recap, they include a new product icon, a refreshed blue theme with small changes across the UI to create a cleaner interface, and a more compact title and menu bar – for which we’ve heard your feedback loud and clear and are working to further optimize.

In addition to the enhancements Jamie mentions, today we’re sharing the new search experience in Visual Studio 2019, which replaces the existing “Quick Launch” box. You can now search for settings, commands, and install options. The new search experience is also smarter, as it supports fuzzy string searching to help find what you are looking for even when misspelled.

The new search experience in Visual Studio 2019

When you’re coding, Visual Studio 2019 makes it easier to get your work done quickly.  We’ve started by focusing on code maintainability and consistency experiences in this preview. We’ve added new refactoring capabilities – such as changing for-loops to LINQ queries and converting tuples to named-structs – to make it even easier to keep your code in good shape. With the new document health indicator and code clean-up functionality, you can now easily identify and fix warnings and suggestions with the click of a button.

The document health indicator and code clean-up command

Common debugging task are also easier. You’ll immediately see that stepping performance is improved, allowing for a much smoother debugging experience. We’ve also added search capabilities to the Autos, Locals, and Watch windows helping you track down objects and values. Watch for a future blog post that goes deeper into the debugger improvements in Visual Studio 2019, including the new Time Travel Debugging for managed code feature (coming to a future Preview), updates to the Snapshot Debugger to target Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) and Virtual Machine Scale Sets (VMSS), and better performance when debugging large C++ projects; thanks to an out-of-process 64-bit debugger.

Search in the Watch window

Helping your team work together

Building on the work we started in Visual Studio 2017, we’re improving Visual Studio IntelliCode, our context-aware and AI-powered IntelliSense, to enable training it on your own code repositories and share the results with your team. IntelliCode reduces the number of keystrokes you need since the completion lists are prioritized on the most common coding patterns for that API combined with the context of the code in your existing project. We’ll have a blog post on all the improvements in IntelliCode coming later this week, including more details on learning from your code, and C++ and XAML support being added for Visual Studio 2019.

Visual Studio IntelliCode using a trained model

Earlier this year, we introduced Visual Studio Live Share to help you collaborate in real-time with anyone across the globe using Visual Studio or Visual Studio Code. Live Share is installed by default with Visual Studio 2019, so you can immediately invite your teammates to join your coding session to take care of a bug or help make a quick change. You’ll also find it’s easier to start a session and view who you’re working within a dedicated space at the top-right of the user interface. We’ll also have a deeper-dive post on Visual Studio Live Share improvements in the next few days, including support for any project, app type, and language, Solution View for guests, and support for more collaboration scenarios.

Visual Studio Live Share integrated in Visual Studio 2019

Last, we’re introducing a brand-new pull request (PR) experience in Visual Studio 2019, which enables you to review, run, and even debug pull requests from your team without leaving the IDE. We support code in Azure Repos today but are going to expand to support GitHub and improve the overall experience. To get started, you can download the Pull Requests for Visual Studio extension from the Visual Studio Marketplace.

The new pull request experience in Visual Studio 2019

.NET Core 3 Preview 1

We also announced .NET Core 3 Preview 1 today, and Visual Studio 2019 will be the release to support building .NET Core 3 applications for any platform. Of course, we also continue to support and improve cross-platform C++ development, as well as .NET mobile development for iOS and Android with Xamarin.

.NET Core 3.0 development in Visual Studio 2019

Help us build the best Visual Studio yet

We are very thankful to have such an active community and can’t wait to hear what you think about Visual Studio 2019. Please help us make this the best Visual Studio yet by letting us know of any issues you run into by using the Report a Problem tool in Visual Studio. You can also head over to the Visual Studio Developer Community to track your issue or, even better, suggest a feature, ask questions, and find answers from others.

We will share more about the full feature set and SKU lineup of Visual Studio 2019 in the coming months as we release more previews. You can try Visual Studio 2019 side-by-side with your current installation of Visual Studio 2017, or if you want to give it a spin without installing it, check out the Visual Studio images on Azure.

I also want to take a moment to thank our vibrant extension ecosystem, who have made over 400 extensions available for Visual Studio 2019 Preview 1 already, and more are being added each day. You can find these extensions on the Visual Studio Marketplace.

Microsoft has always been a company with developers at the heart – we’re humbled that the community of users of the Visual Studio family has surpassed 12 million. We aim to make every second you spend coding more productive and delightful. Please continue to share your feedback on the preview for Visual Studio 2019 to help guide the future direction of the product so it becomes your favorite tool. Thank you!

John Montgomery, Director of Program Management for Visual Studio
@JohnMontJohn is responsible for product design and customer success for all of Visual Studio, C++, C#, VB, JavaScript, and .NET. John has been at Microsoft for 17 years, working in developer technologies the whole time.

New Microsoft Security Intelligence Report Released

November 2nd, 2009 Comments off

Volume seven of the Microsoft Security Intelligence Report (SIRv7) – part of Microsoft’s  commitment to providing an unparalleled level of security intelligence to help keep individuals and organizations better informed and to maximize security investments – was released today and there are a couple of tidbits in the report that caught my attention that I thought I would pass on. As a reminder, the SIR is published by Microsoft twice per year and looks at the data and trends observed in the first and second halves of each calendar year.

The first thing that struck me while reading through the report is that for the first time, the SIR shares some high-level security best practices from countries that have consistently exhibited low malware infection. For example, Japan, Austria and Germany’s infection rates remained relatively low during the first half of this year.

So how do these regions keep their customers and resources safe from cyber threats?  Japan’s infection rates remain relatively low is due in large part to collaborations like the Cyber Clean Center. The Cyber Clean Center is a cooperative project between ISPs, major security vendors and Japanese government agencies aimed at educating users on how to keep their PCs infection free. Austria has implemented strict IT enforcement guidelines to lower piracy rates and this, along with strong ISP relationships and fast Internet lines, has helped ensure the ecosystem is kept up to date with security patches. Germany has also leveraged collaboration efforts with its CERT and ISP communities to help identify and raise awareness of botnet infections and, in some cases, quarantine infected computers.

The other thing that stood out to me was the graph below. This graph shows the effectiveness of automatic updating and shows what happened to the trojan downloader family Win32/Renos once Microsoft released a signature update for Windows Defender via Windows Update and Microsoft Update. Within three days, enough computers had received the new signature update to reduce the error reports from 1.2 million per day to less than 100,000 per day worldwide! To me this shows how important it is for users and organizations to utilize automatic updates to help prevent the spread of malware! 

The report also underscores some of the trends that we have seen from previous versions of the report: for example, the infection rate for Windows Vista is significantly lower than that of its predecessor, Windows XP. It also tells me that the higher the service pack levels of an OS, the lower the infection rate. Once again, these items help point out that you need to keep your software up-to-date. With Windows 7 now available it might be a good time to look at upgrading your OS!

Take a look at the full report at http://www.microsoft.com/sir and use the information to help protect yourself, your networks, and your users.

New Microsoft Security Intelligence Report Released

November 2nd, 2009 No comments

Volume seven of the Microsoft Security Intelligence Report (SIRv7) – part of Microsoft’s  commitment to providing an unparalleled level of security intelligence to help keep individuals and organizations better informed and to maximize security investments – was released today and there are a couple of tidbits in the report that caught my attention that I thought I would pass on. As a reminder, the SIR is published by Microsoft twice per year and looks at the data and trends observed in the first and second halves of each calendar year.

The first thing that struck me while reading through the report is that for the first time, the SIR shares some high-level security best practices from countries that have consistently exhibited low malware infection. For example, Japan, Austria and Germany’s infection rates remained relatively low during the first half of this year.

So how do these regions keep their customers and resources safe from cyber threats?  Japan’s infection rates remain relatively low is due in large part to collaborations like the Cyber Clean Center. The Cyber Clean Center is a cooperative project between ISPs, major security vendors and Japanese government agencies aimed at educating users on how to keep their PCs infection free. Austria has implemented strict IT enforcement guidelines to lower piracy rates and this, along with strong ISP relationships and fast Internet lines, has helped ensure the ecosystem is kept up to date with security patches. Germany has also leveraged collaboration efforts with its CERT and ISP communities to help identify and raise awareness of botnet infections and, in some cases, quarantine infected computers.

The other thing that stood out to me was the graph below. This graph shows the effectiveness of automatic updating and shows what happened to the trojan downloader family Win32/Renos once Microsoft released a signature update for Windows Defender via Windows Update and Microsoft Update. Within three days, enough computers had received the new signature update to reduce the error reports from 1.2 million per day to less than 100,000 per day worldwide! To me this shows how important it is for users and organizations to utilize automatic updates to help prevent the spread of malware! 

The report also underscores some of the trends that we have seen from previous versions of the report: for example, the infection rate for Windows Vista is significantly lower than that of its predecessor, Windows XP. It also tells me that the higher the service pack levels of an OS, the lower the infection rate. Once again, these items help point out that you need to keep your software up-to-date. With Windows 7 now available it might be a good time to look at upgrading your OS!

Take a look at the full report at http://www.microsoft.com/sir and use the information to help protect yourself, your networks, and your users.