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Transparency & Trust in the Cloud Series: Mountain View, California

April 28th, 2015 No comments

T&T Banner

I was in Silicon Valley recently speaking at another Transparency & Trust in the Cloud event. Thank-you very much to all the customers that made time to join us at the Microsoft campus in Mountain View, California! This was another very well attended event with numerous large enterprise customers located in the vicinity in attendance.

Like all the Transparency and Trust events prior to this one, I learned from the attendees what their expectations are for a Cloud Service Provider when it comes to security, privacy and compliance. We had several lively discussions on a range of topics. These are some of the themes that emerged during our discussions:

  • How do customers move data from existing on-premise applications into new applications in the Cloud?
  • What compliance artifacts does Microsoft provide to its Cloud customers?
  • Does Microsoft provide architectural diagrams of what its cloud services look like to its customers?
  • What process does Microsoft use for incident response in the Cloud?

My next stop on this tour is San Diego on April 14th and there are still a few other opportunities to learn more about Microsoft’s approach to building the industry’s most trustworthy Cloud. Please refer to the Transparency & Trust Series event schedule. As always, your Microsoft account team is available if you have any questions about these events.

Tim Rains
Chief Security Advisor
WW Cybersecurity & Data Protection, Microsoft

Transparency & Trust in the Cloud Series: Omaha and Des Moines

April 8th, 2015 No comments

I was in Omaha and Des Moines last week speaking at more Transparency & Trust in the Cloud events. The events in Omaha and Des Moines were very well attended; thank you very much to all the customers that made time to join us. The feedback from the CIOs, CISOs, attorneys, and IT professionals that attended has been very positive.

Dennis Garcia, Assistant General Counsel from Legal and Corporate Affairs at Microsoft talking with customers at a Transparency & Trust in the Cloud Series event in Des Moines

Dennis Garcia, Assistant General Counsel from Legal and Corporate Affairs at Microsoft talking with customers at the Transparency & Trust in the Cloud Series event in Des Moines

I learn from the customers attending these events as much as they learn from the speakers. The themes that emerged during the conversations in Omaha and Des Moines included:

  • Is Microsoft’s plan to get every compliance certification and attestation possible in every country/region where it does business?
  • Does Microsoft sign Business Associate Agreements?
  • How does Microsoft help its customers during incident response investigations?
  • What are best practices for managing crisis communications during and after a breach?
  • What is Microsoft doing to help governments craft public policy for cybersecurity?

My next stops on this tour are Mountain View on April 16th, and San Diego on May 14th. If you are an enterprise customer and would like to learn more about Microsoft’s approach to building the industry’s most trustworthy Cloud, check out the current Transparency & Trust in the Cloud event schedule and please reach out to your account team to find out if one of these events is coming to your area in the future.

I’m also speaking at the RSA Conference 2015 in San Francisco on April 21st – if you are attending the conference, please check out some of the Microsoft sessions.

California here I come!

RSA Conference 2015: Enhancing Cloud Trust

March 31st, 2015 No comments

RSA Conference USA 2015 is just a few weeks away (April 20-24) in San Francisco. Given the numerous noteworthy cybersecurity events that have occurred over the last 12 months, I expect this conference to be well attended, yet again!

Once more, Microsoft is a Diamond sponsor, and Scott Charney, Corporate Vice President, Trustworthy Computing, will deliver a keynote at the conference. His keynote, entitled “Enhancing Cloud Trust,” will be delivered Tuesday, April 21st at 8:50 AM PT.

On Tuesday, April 21st at 1:10 PM PT, I will be delivering a speaker session, “Exploitation Trends: from potential risk to actual risk” as part of the Breaking Research track. Microsoft researchers have studied some of the exploits discovered over the past several years and the specific vulnerabilities in Microsoft software that were targeted. The goal of this of study is to understand which vulnerabilities are exploited, who exploits them, the timing of exploitation attempts relative to when security updates are available, and how these vulnerabilities were introduced into code. These findings are key in helping security professionals more accurately assess the risk vulnerabilities pose.

I’m excited to be joined by two exploit researchers Matt Miller, Principal Security Software Engineer from the Microsoft Security Response Center and David Weston, Principal Program Manager from the Microsoft One Protection Team. Together, we will be discussing the long-term trend data and our brand new research.

And finally, we will examine how exploits are monetized through exploit kits that are sold as commercial software or as a service as well as development practices that can help minimize such vulnerabilities.

There are several Microsoft speakers at the conference this year; below is a full list of their sessions.

MICROSOFT SPEAKER SESSIONS

Title Date Time (PT)
License to Kill: Malware Hunting with the Sysinternals Tools – Mark Russinovich Tuesday, 4/21 1:10 PM
Exploitation Trends: from potential risk to actual risk – Tim Rains, Matt Miller, David Weston Tuesday, 4/21 1:10 PM
Security and Privacy in the Cloud:  How Far Have We Come? – Bret Arsenault (Panel Discussion) Tuesday, 4/21 4:40 PM
Assume Breach: An Inside Look at Cloud Service Provider Security – Mark Russinovich Wednesday, 4/22 8:00 AM
Doing Security Response with your Cloud Service Provider – Jerry Cochran (Peer-to-Peer Session) Wednesday, 4/22 8:00 AM
License to Kill: Malware Hunting with the Sysinternals Tools – Mark Russinovich Wednesday, 4/22 9:10 AM
Enterprise Cloud: Advancing SaaS Security and Trust – Chang Kawaguchi Wednesday, 4/22 10:20 AM
The Legal Pitfalls of Failing to Develop Secure Cloud Services – Cristin Goodwin Thursday, 4/23 10:20 AM
Pass-the-Hash II: The Wrath of Hardware – Nathan Ide Thursday, 4/23 10:20 AM

 Microsoft is also hosting a booth on the expo floor where we will host a number of theater sessions. To find session descriptions and times, as well as details on the Microsoft party (Wednesday, April 22nd, 8:00 PM PT), please visit http://rsa2015.microsoft.com.

One other session that I think you should check out is being delivered by a longtime colleague, Nicole Miller, Senior Vice President, Cybersecurity & Issues Management, Waggener Edstrom. Nicole has been working with companies on cybersecurity for many years, and it’s a rare treat to hear her speak in public. Her session is called “From the Battlefield: Managing Customer Perceptions in a Security Crisis” and is scheduled on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 at 3:30 PM PT.

I hope to see you at the conference!

Security, privacy, and reliability in a connected world

February 28th, 2012 No comments

Microsoft’s Trustworthy Computing corporate vice President Scott Charney shared his security vision for the next decade in his keynote address at the RSA conference today. Charney’s keynote highlighted new and persistent security risks in light of society’s increased dependence on information systems and identified key drivers of change in today’s interconnected world.

Learn more about security, cybersecurity and technology trends, news and guidance at the Official Microsoft Security blog or follow Microsoft Security on Twitter.

Microsoft at the RSA Conference 2011

February 21st, 2011 Comments off

RSA is an annual conference for security professionals from
across the globe. At the 2011 event, Microsoft presented the idea of a collective defense
against security threats.

For more information about Microsoft’s role in the
RSA Conference, visit the Microsoft
Security and Privacy Newsroom
.

 

 

Categories: Microsoft, RSA Tags:

Creating a Safer, More Trusted Internet

March 3rd, 2010 Comments off

The RSA Security Conference is underway this week in San Francisco and Microsoft’s own Scott Charney, Corporate Vice President Trustworthy Computing, delivered one of yesterday’s keynote addresses: Creating a Safer, More Trusted Internet. The keynote centered on Microsoft’s Trustworthy Computing initiative, our End to End Trust vision, and how we have been working to further protect the security and privacy of for all the users of the Internet.

The End to End Trust vision has not changed over the last couple of years and we don’t anticipate it changing for some time. We continue to make progress along this vision and Scott outlined many areas where we are actively engaged and providing thought leadership. The keynote showcased how our vision for End to End Trust applies to cloud computing, detailed progress toward a claims-based identity meta-system, and called for public and private organizations alike to prevent and disrupt cybercrime.

One of the most interesting aspects from my perspective was the notion of creating a “World Health Organization” model for the Internet. We are calling on the governments and industry to creatively help prevent cybercrime by implementing technology and policy models that assess PC health before connecting the machine to the Internet. This is an ambitious vision and one I am proud to support.

If you want to know more about the things Scott talked about in his keynote and our End To End vision, I encourage you to visit the newly revamped End To End Trust website for more details.

Creating a Safer, More Trusted Internet

March 3rd, 2010 No comments

The RSA Security Conference is underway this week in San Francisco and Microsoft’s own Scott Charney, Corporate Vice President Trustworthy Computing, delivered one of yesterday’s keynote addresses: Creating a Safer, More Trusted Internet. The keynote centered on Microsoft’s Trustworthy Computing initiative, our End to End Trust vision, and how we have been working to further protect the security and privacy of for all the users of the Internet.

The End to End Trust vision has not changed over the last couple of years and we don’t anticipate it changing for some time. We continue to make progress along this vision and Scott outlined many areas where we are actively engaged and providing thought leadership. The keynote showcased how our vision for End to End Trust applies to cloud computing, detailed progress toward a claims-based identity meta-system, and called for public and private organizations alike to prevent and disrupt cybercrime.

One of the most interesting aspects from my perspective was the notion of creating a “World Health Organization” model for the Internet. We are calling on the governments and industry to creatively help prevent cybercrime by implementing technology and policy models that assess PC health before connecting the machine to the Internet. This is an ambitious vision and one I am proud to support.

If you want to know more about the things Scott talked about in his keynote and our End To End vision, I encourage you to visit the newly revamped End To End Trust website for more details.

Creating a Safer, More Trusted Internet

March 3rd, 2010 No comments

The RSA Security Conference is underway this week in San Francisco and Microsoft’s own Scott Charney, Corporate Vice President Trustworthy Computing, delivered one of yesterday’s keynote addresses: Creating a Safer, More Trusted Internet. The keynote centered on Microsoft’s Trustworthy Computing initiative, our End to End Trust vision, and how we have been working to further protect the security and privacy of for all the users of the Internet.

The End to End Trust vision has not changed over the last couple of years and we don’t anticipate it changing for some time. We continue to make progress along this vision and Scott outlined many areas where we are actively engaged and providing thought leadership. The keynote showcased how our vision for End to End Trust applies to cloud computing, detailed progress toward a claims-based identity meta-system, and called for public and private organizations alike to prevent and disrupt cybercrime.

One of the most interesting aspects from my perspective was the notion of creating a “World Health Organization” model for the Internet. We are calling on the governments and industry to creatively help prevent cybercrime by implementing technology and policy models that assess PC health before connecting the machine to the Internet. This is an ambitious vision and one I am proud to support.

If you want to know more about the things Scott talked about in his keynote and our End To End vision, I encourage you to visit the newly revamped End To End Trust website for more details.

Business Ready Security and Windows 7

April 24th, 2009 No comments

Here’s the last of the security stories from the RSA show floor. To wrap things up we asked John (JG) Chirapurath (Director, Identity & Security Business Group) to give us a quick rundown on Microsoft Forefront for Business Ready Security and how it fits in with Windows 7.


A Look at Microsoft Forefront

Internet Explorer 8 Security

April 24th, 2009 No comments

Here is another story from a Microsoft Program Manger discussing their favorite things in Windows 7. This time it is Eric Lawrence (Senior Program Manager on the Internet Explorer Team) to talk about his favorite security features in Internet Explorer 8, the browser that ships in Windows 7.


Eric Lawrence Discusses His Favorite Internet Explorer Security Features

Categories: Internet Explorer 8, RSA, security, Windows 7 Tags:

Steve Riley on Windows 7 Security

April 23rd, 2009 No comments

While walking the show floor here at RSA, I ran into Steve Riley, who’s an incredibly passionate and knowledgeable Security Evangelist (or officially “Senior Technical Evangelist”) in Microsoft’s Trustworthy Computing organization. He’s a well respected and sought out speaker on security topics. So I thought it would be great to get Steve’s take on his favorite two security features in Windows 7. Take a look at what Steve has to say about Windows 7 security!


Steve Riley discusses Windows 7 Security Features at RSA

AppLocker: Direct from RSA

April 22nd, 2009 No comments

The buzz at RSA around Windows 7 has been tremendous.

Yesterday, in his keynote, Scott Charney (Corporate VP Trustworthy Computing) talked about AppLocker and how it helps ensure that only known, trusted software is run within an organization’s desktop environment. Shortly after the keynote, I ran into Marcelo Birnbach – a Senior Program Manager in the Windows Security Technologies organization and works on AppLocker – on the expo floor. Since he’s an expert, we thought we would ask him for his perspective on AppLocker in Windows 7.


Marcelo Birnbach talks about Windows 7’s AppLocker Feature

And since Marcelo is originally from Argentina, we also asked him to share his thoughts in Spanish.


Marcelo Birnbach talks about Windows 7’s AppLocker Feature [Spanish Version]

Categories: AppLocker, RSA, Windows 7, Windows Security Tags:

End to End Trust and Windows 7

April 21st, 2009 No comments

I attended Scott Charney’s keynote this morning at RSA – Moving Towards End to End Trust: A Collaborative Effort. I would assume that many of the readers of this blog are not familiar with the End to End Trust story. In a nutshell, End to End trust is Microsoft’s vision for creating a safer, more trusted Internet. It’s a great vision, but it’s also a big job that requires a commitment and focus on the fundamentals—fundamentals that will help deliver the most secure and privacy-enhanced versions of software and services that we have ever delivered. We’re also not going it alone. End to End Trust requires broad collaboration within the industry and Microsoft will continue to share our best practices with the IT communities of our customers.

Scott talked about how hard we are working across Microsoft to deliver technology innovations that move the needle towards a trusted stack, with security rooted in hardware and an identity metasystem (a big word that means a way of trusting people are who they say they are on the Internet). Even with progress, people still need strong defense in depth security technologies and Scott talked about how Microsoft’s Identity and Security Division is delivering integrated identity and security business solutions today to our customers. But maybe the most interesting thing he touched on was how technology innovations alone are not enough. Innovation also needs to align with political, economic and IT forces to enable the change that is truly needed.

End to End trust is a vision of what’s possible if we collectively work together, and it can help address real world problems that people face every day such as ID theft, online fraud and child safety. If you want to learn more about End to End Trust, visit http://www.microsoft.com/endtoendtrust to find out the entire story.

Windows7_h_rgb

Now, let’s talk about Windows 7 and the progress we’re making to deliver End to End Trust in the Windows platform. In my blog post yesterday on how Windows 7 helps enable the mobile workforce, I wrote about technologies like DirectAccess, BitLocker To Go, and AppLocker. Each of these technologies plays a part in helping us enable End to End Trust, whether it is strong machine and user authentication with DirectAccess or limiting running software on a system to known, trusted applications with AppLocker. But there are other technologies that help us as well:

Biometric Framework
Fingerprint scanners are becoming more and more common in standard laptop configurations—my laptop came standard with one. Windows 7 helps ensure that fingerprint readers work well and that they are easy to set up and use. This is accomplished by taking the common code that everyone needs to write and standardizing it in the platform so that biometric hardware vendors can concentrate on the code they need to write to make their device work and not have to worry about how it ties into Windows. This new framework makes logging on to Windows using a fingerprint more reliable across different hardware providers and makes fingerprint reader configurations are easy to modify. This puts the user in control of how they log on to Windows 7 and manage the fingerprint data stored on their PC.

Improved Smart Card Support
Password-based authentication has well-understood security limitations; however, deploying strong authentication technologies like smart cards remains a challenge for many. Windows 7 enhances the smart card infrastructure advances made in Windows Vista through support of Plug and Play. This eases deployment of smart card infrastructures because drivers for both smart cards and smart card readers are automatically installed, without the need for administrative permissions or user interaction. I think this new behavior is going to ease the deployment of strong, two-factor authentication for many organizations.

BitLocker
I’m a big fan of BitLocker, it helps prevent a thief who boots another operating system or runs a software hacking tool from breaking into my laptop if they happen to get a hold of it. This holds true for both the operating system volume (C: drive) and my data volume (D: drive). Most customers I talk to love the encryption protection that BitLocker provides, but many are not aware that BitLocker also does integrity checking of early boot components to help ensure that the system has not been tampered with and that the encrypted drive has not been swapped out to another computer. This integrity checking ties back into the “security rooted in hardware” that is a part of End to End Trust. This integrity checking utilizes a Trusted Platform Module (a smart card like chip on the system motherboard) to help protect the encryption keys utilized by BitLocker. This is true for BitLocker in Windows 7 as well as Windows Vista.

We’ve also listened to feedback and made enhancements to Windows 7 BitLocker to provide a better experience for IT Pros and for end users. One of the simple enhancements we made is to right-click enable the BitLocker protection of a disk volume. Now I can go to Windows Explorer and right click any disk volume, including my removable BitLocker To Go volumes, and encrypt them right there without having to go to the Control Panel.

Another big change was the addition of Data Recovery Agent (DRA) support for all protected volumes. The DRA is a certificate-based data recovery agent that can be utilized to recover the contents of any BitLocker protected volume. Since the group policy settings are separate for Operating System Drives, Fixed Data Drives, and Removable Data Drives, customers have flexibility in how they want to configure their recovery options for the different threats that each separate drive type may experience.

With BitLocker and BitLocker To Go, enterprises can rest assured that their information and data is secure, no matter where their employees are working. I know I feel better knowing my laptop and all of my USB sticks are protected!

Internet Explorer 8

I know folks are more concerned than ever about protecting themselves while online, particularly form identity theft, malware, and other potentially dangerous online threats. I feel like we have done a lot in the platform and the security technologies we have been talking about this week (Firewall, DirectAccess, BitLocker To Go and AppLocker) are a part of the protection equation. But Internet Explorer 8 is also another huge piece of the equation as users spend more time online, in their browsers. IE 8 is the most secure web browser on the market and provides another, vital layer of defense against online threats.

We built upon the phishing protection in Internet Explorer 7 with the SmartScreen Filter, which now adds protection from malware – a threat that is growing significantly faster than phishing.

We also built in support for protecting users against type-1 (or “reflection) Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) attacks. XSS threats try to exploit vulnerabilities in the websites we visit and are quickly becoming one of the most prevalent ways web sites can be compromised. The bad news for you and I is that an XSS attack can help a bad guy steal our usernames and passwords for our online bank accounts or other confidential information. The XSS filter in IE 8 uses heuristics to detect such attacks and, when they are detected, prevent their execution. This should help you and I safe from the most common form of XSS attacks in use today.

Another innovation concerns ClickJacking. While a lot or people have heard of phishing attacks, a new kind of phishing attack called ClickJacking is on the rise. ClickJacking occurs where an attacker’s web page deceives a person into clicking on content from another website without realizing it – so they’re clicking on something that, for instance, buys something from the site, changes settings on their browser, or provides advertisements that these cybercriminals get paid for. ClickJacking Protection in IE is a feature that allows Web site content owners to put a tag in a page header that will help prevent ClickJacking.

I think the IE team has done a great job with the security in IE 8 and love that it puts people in control of their safety and privacy and helps protect them from new online threats. For those of you who are interested, there is a lot more security goodness in IE 8 on the IE blog and via these links:

Got To Run

I feel great about Windows 7 and the security enhancements we have been able to make. Hopefully as you learn more about the security work that we have put into it, you will reach the same conclusion that I have: Windows 7 is the most robust platform we have ever delivered, it helps support End to End trust, helps keep you and I safe, and was designed to prevent malware from getting onto our PCs to begin with.

There is a lot going on here at RSA and I want to go spend some more time seeing what’s new and exciting. I’ll be back with some of my impressions of RSA in a bit.