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See NAP at TechEd 2009

May 12th, 2009 Comments off

Hey NAP Fans!


If you are attending TechEd 2009 in Los Angeles this week, be sure to stop by the NAP booth in the Microsoft Technical Learning Center (TLC).  It is a great opportunity to meet and speak with NAP team members and learn about some of the enhancements and new scenarios in Windows® 7 and Windows® Server 2008 R2. 


Also there are at least two breakout sessions that would be useful for anyone interested in learning more about NAP deployments.   Both are on Friday May 15th:


WSV206 Windows Clients and Windows Server 2008 NAP: Why They Are Better Together


Presenter: Jay Ferron


Fri 5/15 | 9:00 AM-10:15 AM | Room 502A


 


WSV305 Deploying NAP: Best Practices and Lessons Learned


Presenters: Venkatesh Gopalakrishnan, Lambert Green


Fri 5/15 | 2:45 PM-4:00 PM | Room 403B


 


Hope to see you there,


The NAP Team

See NAP at TechEd 2009

May 12th, 2009 No comments

Hey NAP Fans!


If you are attending TechEd 2009 in Los Angeles this week, be sure to stop by the NAP booth in the Microsoft Technical Learning Center (TLC).  It is a great opportunity to meet and speak with NAP team members and learn about some of the enhancements and new scenarios in Windows® 7 and Windows® Server 2008 R2. 


Also there are at least two breakout sessions that would be useful for anyone interested in learning more about NAP deployments.   Both are on Friday May 15th:


WSV206 Windows Clients and Windows Server 2008 NAP: Why They Are Better Together


Presenter: Jay Ferron


Fri 5/15 | 9:00 AM-10:15 AM | Room 502A


 


WSV305 Deploying NAP: Best Practices and Lessons Learned


Presenters: Venkatesh Gopalakrishnan, Lambert Green


Fri 5/15 | 2:45 PM-4:00 PM | Room 403B


 


Hope to see you there,


The NAP Team

See NAP at TechEd 2009

May 12th, 2009 No comments

Hey NAP Fans!


If you are attending TechEd 2009 in Los Angeles this week, be sure to stop by the NAP booth in the Microsoft Technical Learning Center (TLC).  It is a great opportunity to meet and speak with NAP team members and learn about some of the enhancements and new scenarios in Windows® 7 and Windows® Server 2008 R2. 


Also there are at least two breakout sessions that would be useful for anyone interested in learning more about NAP deployments.   Both are on Friday May 15th:


WSV206 Windows Clients and Windows Server 2008 NAP: Why They Are Better Together


Presenter: Jay Ferron


Fri 5/15 | 9:00 AM-10:15 AM | Room 502A


 


WSV305 Deploying NAP: Best Practices and Lessons Learned


Presenters: Venkatesh Gopalakrishnan, Lambert Green


Fri 5/15 | 2:45 PM-4:00 PM | Room 403B


 


Hope to see you there,


The NAP Team

See NAP at TechEd 2009

May 12th, 2009 No comments

Hey NAP Fans!


If you are attending TechEd 2009 in Los Angeles this week, be sure to stop by the NAP booth in the Microsoft Technical Learning Center (TLC).  It is a great opportunity to meet and speak with NAP team members and learn about some of the enhancements and new scenarios in Windows® 7 and Windows® Server 2008 R2. 


Also there are at least two breakout sessions that would be useful for anyone interested in learning more about NAP deployments.   Both are on Friday May 15th:


WSV206 Windows Clients and Windows Server 2008 NAP: Why They Are Better Together


Presenter: Jay Ferron


Fri 5/15 | 9:00 AM-10:15 AM | Room 502A


 


WSV305 Deploying NAP: Best Practices and Lessons Learned


Presenters: Venkatesh Gopalakrishnan, Lambert Green


Fri 5/15 | 2:45 PM-4:00 PM | Room 403B


 


Hope to see you there,


The NAP Team

See NAP at TechEd 2009

May 12th, 2009 No comments

Hey NAP Fans!


If you are attending TechEd 2009 in Los Angeles this week, be sure to stop by the NAP booth in the Microsoft Technical Learning Center (TLC).  It is a great opportunity to meet and speak with NAP team members and learn about some of the enhancements and new scenarios in Windows® 7 and Windows® Server 2008 R2. 


Also there are at least two breakout sessions that would be useful for anyone interested in learning more about NAP deployments.   Both are on Friday May 15th:


WSV206 Windows Clients and Windows Server 2008 NAP: Why They Are Better Together


Presenter: Jay Ferron


Fri 5/15 | 9:00 AM-10:15 AM | Room 502A


 


WSV305 Deploying NAP: Best Practices and Lessons Learned


Presenters: Venkatesh Gopalakrishnan, Lambert Green


Fri 5/15 | 2:45 PM-4:00 PM | Room 403B


 


Hope to see you there,


The NAP Team

See NAP at TechEd 2009

May 11th, 2009 No comments

Hey NAP Fans!

If you are attending TechEd 2009 in Los Angeles this week, be sure to stop by the NAP booth in the Microsoft Technical Learning Center (TLC).  It is a great opportunity to meet and speak with NAP team members and learn about some of the enhancements and new scenarios in Windows® 7 and Windows® Server 2008 R2. 

Also there are at least two breakout sessions that would be useful for anyone interested in learning more about NAP deployments.   Both are on Friday May 15th:

WSV206 Windows Clients and Windows Server 2008 NAP: Why They Are Better Together

Presenter: Jay Ferron

Fri 5/15 | 9:00 AM-10:15 AM | Room 502A

 

WSV305 Deploying NAP: Best Practices and Lessons Learned

Presenters: Venkatesh Gopalakrishnan, Lambert Green

Fri 5/15 | 2:45 PM-4:00 PM | Room 403B

 

Hope to see you there,

The NAP Team

Example of using the new NPS templates feature in Windows Server 2008 R2

February 26th, 2009 Comments off

In a previous NAP blog entry, we described the new NPS templates feature in Windows Server 2008 R2. In this blog entry, we show an example of using a template for a RADIUS shared secret.


Templates for RADIUS shared secrets allow users to specify a shared secret that can be reused when configuring RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers in the Network Policy Server snap-in. To create and use a RADIUS shared secret template, do the following:


1. From the Network Policy Server snap-in, open the Templates Management node.


2. In the console tree, right-click Shared Secrets, and then click New.


3. In Template Name, type a name for the shared secret template, and then either manually specify the shared secret or have NPS automatically generate one.


4. Click OK to save changes.


To use the RADIUS shared secret template, configure a RADIUS client, a remote RADIUS server, or a remote RADIUS server template and specify the template name for the shared secret, rather than manually configuring a shared secret or having NPS generate one. The following figure shows an example.


NPS template example


To view which RADIUS clients, remote RADIUS servers, and remote RADIUS server templates use a specific RADIUS shared secret template, right click the name of the RADIUS shared secret template, and then click View Usage.


 



NAP Product Team

Example of using the new NPS templates feature in Windows Server 2008 R2

February 26th, 2009 No comments

In a previous NAP blog entry, we described the new NPS templates feature in Windows Server 2008 R2. In this blog entry, we show an example of using a template for a RADIUS shared secret.


Templates for RADIUS shared secrets allow users to specify a shared secret that can be reused when configuring RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers in the Network Policy Server snap-in. To create and use a RADIUS shared secret template, do the following:


1. From the Network Policy Server snap-in, open the Templates Management node.


2. In the console tree, right-click Shared Secrets, and then click New.


3. In Template Name, type a name for the shared secret template, and then either manually specify the shared secret or have NPS automatically generate one.


4. Click OK to save changes.


To use the RADIUS shared secret template, configure a RADIUS client, a remote RADIUS server, or a remote RADIUS server template and specify the template name for the shared secret, rather than manually configuring a shared secret or having NPS generate one. The following figure shows an example.


NPS template example


To view which RADIUS clients, remote RADIUS servers, and remote RADIUS server templates use a specific RADIUS shared secret template, right click the name of the RADIUS shared secret template, and then click View Usage.


 



NAP Product Team

Example of using the new NPS templates feature in Windows Server 2008 R2

February 26th, 2009 No comments

In a previous NAP blog entry, we described the new NPS templates feature in Windows Server 2008 R2. In this blog entry, we show an example of using a template for a RADIUS shared secret.


Templates for RADIUS shared secrets allow users to specify a shared secret that can be reused when configuring RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers in the Network Policy Server snap-in. To create and use a RADIUS shared secret template, do the following:


1. From the Network Policy Server snap-in, open the Templates Management node.


2. In the console tree, right-click Shared Secrets, and then click New.


3. In Template Name, type a name for the shared secret template, and then either manually specify the shared secret or have NPS automatically generate one.


4. Click OK to save changes.


To use the RADIUS shared secret template, configure a RADIUS client, a remote RADIUS server, or a remote RADIUS server template and specify the template name for the shared secret, rather than manually configuring a shared secret or having NPS generate one. The following figure shows an example.


NPS template example


To view which RADIUS clients, remote RADIUS servers, and remote RADIUS server templates use a specific RADIUS shared secret template, right click the name of the RADIUS shared secret template, and then click View Usage.


 



NAP Product Team

Example of using the new NPS templates feature in Windows Server 2008 R2

February 26th, 2009 No comments

In a previous NAP blog entry, we described the new NPS templates feature in Windows Server 2008 R2. In this blog entry, we show an example of using a template for a RADIUS shared secret.


Templates for RADIUS shared secrets allow users to specify a shared secret that can be reused when configuring RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers in the Network Policy Server snap-in. To create and use a RADIUS shared secret template, do the following:


1. From the Network Policy Server snap-in, open the Templates Management node.


2. In the console tree, right-click Shared Secrets, and then click New.


3. In Template Name, type a name for the shared secret template, and then either manually specify the shared secret or have NPS automatically generate one.


4. Click OK to save changes.


To use the RADIUS shared secret template, configure a RADIUS client, a remote RADIUS server, or a remote RADIUS server template and specify the template name for the shared secret, rather than manually configuring a shared secret or having NPS generate one. The following figure shows an example.


NPS template example


To view which RADIUS clients, remote RADIUS servers, and remote RADIUS server templates use a specific RADIUS shared secret template, right click the name of the RADIUS shared secret template, and then click View Usage.


 



NAP Product Team

Example of using the new NPS templates feature in Windows Server 2008 R2

February 26th, 2009 No comments

In a previous NAP blog entry, we described the new NPS templates feature in Windows Server 2008 R2. In this blog entry, we show an example of using a template for a RADIUS shared secret.


Templates for RADIUS shared secrets allow users to specify a shared secret that can be reused when configuring RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers in the Network Policy Server snap-in. To create and use a RADIUS shared secret template, do the following:


1. From the Network Policy Server snap-in, open the Templates Management node.


2. In the console tree, right-click Shared Secrets, and then click New.


3. In Template Name, type a name for the shared secret template, and then either manually specify the shared secret or have NPS automatically generate one.


4. Click OK to save changes.


To use the RADIUS shared secret template, configure a RADIUS client, a remote RADIUS server, or a remote RADIUS server template and specify the template name for the shared secret, rather than manually configuring a shared secret or having NPS generate one. The following figure shows an example.


NPS template example


To view which RADIUS clients, remote RADIUS servers, and remote RADIUS server templates use a specific RADIUS shared secret template, right click the name of the RADIUS shared secret template, and then click View Usage.


 



NAP Product Team

Example of using the new NPS templates feature in Windows Server 2008 R2

February 26th, 2009 No comments

In a previous NAP blog entry, we described the new NPS templates feature in Windows Server 2008 R2. In this blog entry, we show an example of using a template for a RADIUS shared secret.

Templates for RADIUS shared secrets allow users to specify a shared secret that can be reused when configuring RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers in the Network Policy Server snap-in. To create and use a RADIUS shared secret template, do the following:

1. From the Network Policy Server snap-in, open the Templates Management node.

2. In the console tree, right-click Shared Secrets, and then click New.

3. In Template Name, type a name for the shared secret template, and then either manually specify the shared secret or have NPS automatically generate one.

4. Click OK to save changes.

To use the RADIUS shared secret template, configure a RADIUS client, a remote RADIUS server, or a remote RADIUS server template and specify the template name for the shared secret, rather than manually configuring a shared secret or having NPS generate one. The following figure shows an example.

NPS template example

To view which RADIUS clients, remote RADIUS servers, and remote RADIUS server templates use a specific RADIUS shared secret template, right click the name of the RADIUS shared secret template, and then click View Usage.

 

NAP Product Team

NPS templates in Windows Server 2008 R2

February 17th, 2009 No comments

NPS templates, the flagship feature of NPS in Windows Server 2008 R2, provides a huge reduction in cost of ownership and deployment for all NPS environments. NPS templates separate common RADIUS configuration elements such as RADIUS shared secrets and RADIUS clients from the configuration running on the server. When referenced, the NPS setting inherits the values configured in the specified template. A change in the template changes the corresponding value in all of the places in which the template is referenced. For example, a single RADIUS shared secret template can be referenced for multiple RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers. When you change the RADIUS shared secret template, the change is inherited by all of the RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers in which that RADIUS shared secret template is referenced.


You can also use NPS templates to assist in configuration with referencing them. For example, you can create a RADIUS client template that contains common settings (such as the vendor type or shared secret) for a specific group of RADIUS clients (such as all wireless APs from a specific vendor). When you create a new RADIUS client, you can select the RADIUS client template to obtain the common settings. When you unselect the template, the inherited settings remain and you can configure individual settings, such as the RADIUS client’s IP address.


Note  Template settings are not supported by commands in the netsh nps context. Using netsh nps commands will remove the reference to the template and change the configuration element specified in the command.


NPS template settings can also be easily migrated and synchronized across multiple NPS servers.


The following types of configuration elements use templates:


·         RADIUS shared secret


·         RADIUS clients


·         Remote RADIUS servers


·         IP filters


·         Health policies


·         Remediation server groups


You can configure templates for these configuration elements from the Templates Management node of the Network Policy Server snap-in. The following figure shows an example.


Templates in the new NPS snap-in


For a larger version of this figure, click here.


Individual templates can be added, edited, duplicated, or deleted. After they are configured, they can be referenced and de-referenced in the appropriate dialog boxes in the Network Policy Server snap-in.


The following table lists the different types of templates and where they are used in the Network Policy Server snap-in.


























Template


Where it is used


RADIUS shared secret


When creating or configuring RADIUS clients, remote RADIUS server group members, RADIUS client templates, or remote RADIUS server templates


RADIUS clients


When creating or configuring RADIUS clients


Remote RADIUS servers


When creating or configuring remote RADIUS server group members


IP filters


When configuring IP Filters settings for a network policy


Health policies


When creating or configuring health policies


Remediation server groups


When creating or configuring remediation server groups



NAP Product Team

NPS templates in Windows Server 2008 R2

February 17th, 2009 No comments

NPS templates, the flagship feature of NPS in Windows Server 2008 R2, provides a huge reduction in cost of ownership and deployment for all NPS environments. NPS templates separate common RADIUS configuration elements such as RADIUS shared secrets and RADIUS clients from the configuration running on the server. When referenced, the NPS setting inherits the values configured in the specified template. A change in the template changes the corresponding value in all of the places in which the template is referenced. For example, a single RADIUS shared secret template can be referenced for multiple RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers. When you change the RADIUS shared secret template, the change is inherited by all of the RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers in which that RADIUS shared secret template is referenced.


You can also use NPS templates to assist in configuration with referencing them. For example, you can create a RADIUS client template that contains common settings (such as the vendor type or shared secret) for a specific group of RADIUS clients (such as all wireless APs from a specific vendor). When you create a new RADIUS client, you can select the RADIUS client template to obtain the common settings. When you unselect the template, the inherited settings remain and you can configure individual settings, such as the RADIUS client’s IP address.


Note  Template settings are not supported by commands in the netsh nps context. Using netsh nps commands will remove the reference to the template and change the configuration element specified in the command.


NPS template settings can also be easily migrated and synchronized across multiple NPS servers.


The following types of configuration elements use templates:


·         RADIUS shared secret


·         RADIUS clients


·         Remote RADIUS servers


·         IP filters


·         Health policies


·         Remediation server groups


You can configure templates for these configuration elements from the Templates Management node of the Network Policy Server snap-in. The following figure shows an example.


Templates in the new NPS snap-in


For a larger version of this figure, click here.


Individual templates can be added, edited, duplicated, or deleted. After they are configured, they can be referenced and de-referenced in the appropriate dialog boxes in the Network Policy Server snap-in.


The following table lists the different types of templates and where they are used in the Network Policy Server snap-in.


























Template


Where it is used


RADIUS shared secret


When creating or configuring RADIUS clients, remote RADIUS server group members, RADIUS client templates, or remote RADIUS server templates


RADIUS clients


When creating or configuring RADIUS clients


Remote RADIUS servers


When creating or configuring remote RADIUS server group members


IP filters


When configuring IP Filters settings for a network policy


Health policies


When creating or configuring health policies


Remediation server groups


When creating or configuring remediation server groups



NAP Product Team

NPS templates in Windows Server 2008 R2

February 17th, 2009 No comments

NPS templates, the flagship feature of NPS in Windows Server 2008 R2, provides a huge reduction in cost of ownership and deployment for all NPS environments. NPS templates separate common RADIUS configuration elements such as RADIUS shared secrets and RADIUS clients from the configuration running on the server. When referenced, the NPS setting inherits the values configured in the specified template. A change in the template changes the corresponding value in all of the places in which the template is referenced. For example, a single RADIUS shared secret template can be referenced for multiple RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers. When you change the RADIUS shared secret template, the change is inherited by all of the RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers in which that RADIUS shared secret template is referenced.


You can also use NPS templates to assist in configuration with referencing them. For example, you can create a RADIUS client template that contains common settings (such as the vendor type or shared secret) for a specific group of RADIUS clients (such as all wireless APs from a specific vendor). When you create a new RADIUS client, you can select the RADIUS client template to obtain the common settings. When you unselect the template, the inherited settings remain and you can configure individual settings, such as the RADIUS client’s IP address.


Note  Template settings are not supported by commands in the netsh nps context. Using netsh nps commands will remove the reference to the template and change the configuration element specified in the command.


NPS template settings can also be easily migrated and synchronized across multiple NPS servers.


The following types of configuration elements use templates:


·         RADIUS shared secret


·         RADIUS clients


·         Remote RADIUS servers


·         IP filters


·         Health policies


·         Remediation server groups


You can configure templates for these configuration elements from the Templates Management node of the Network Policy Server snap-in. The following figure shows an example.


Templates in the new NPS snap-in


For a larger version of this figure, click here.


Individual templates can be added, edited, duplicated, or deleted. After they are configured, they can be referenced and de-referenced in the appropriate dialog boxes in the Network Policy Server snap-in.


The following table lists the different types of templates and where they are used in the Network Policy Server snap-in.


























Template


Where it is used


RADIUS shared secret


When creating or configuring RADIUS clients, remote RADIUS server group members, RADIUS client templates, or remote RADIUS server templates


RADIUS clients


When creating or configuring RADIUS clients


Remote RADIUS servers


When creating or configuring remote RADIUS server group members


IP filters


When configuring IP Filters settings for a network policy


Health policies


When creating or configuring health policies


Remediation server groups


When creating or configuring remediation server groups



NAP Product Team

NPS templates in Windows Server 2008 R2

February 17th, 2009 No comments

NPS templates, the flagship feature of NPS in Windows Server 2008 R2, provides a huge reduction in cost of ownership and deployment for all NPS environments. NPS templates separate common RADIUS configuration elements such as RADIUS shared secrets and RADIUS clients from the configuration running on the server. When referenced, the NPS setting inherits the values configured in the specified template. A change in the template changes the corresponding value in all of the places in which the template is referenced. For example, a single RADIUS shared secret template can be referenced for multiple RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers. When you change the RADIUS shared secret template, the change is inherited by all of the RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers in which that RADIUS shared secret template is referenced.


You can also use NPS templates to assist in configuration with referencing them. For example, you can create a RADIUS client template that contains common settings (such as the vendor type or shared secret) for a specific group of RADIUS clients (such as all wireless APs from a specific vendor). When you create a new RADIUS client, you can select the RADIUS client template to obtain the common settings. When you unselect the template, the inherited settings remain and you can configure individual settings, such as the RADIUS client’s IP address.


Note  Template settings are not supported by commands in the netsh nps context. Using netsh nps commands will remove the reference to the template and change the configuration element specified in the command.


NPS template settings can also be easily migrated and synchronized across multiple NPS servers.


The following types of configuration elements use templates:


·         RADIUS shared secret


·         RADIUS clients


·         Remote RADIUS servers


·         IP filters


·         Health policies


·         Remediation server groups


You can configure templates for these configuration elements from the Templates Management node of the Network Policy Server snap-in. The following figure shows an example.


Templates in the new NPS snap-in


For a larger version of this figure, click here.


Individual templates can be added, edited, duplicated, or deleted. After they are configured, they can be referenced and de-referenced in the appropriate dialog boxes in the Network Policy Server snap-in.


The following table lists the different types of templates and where they are used in the Network Policy Server snap-in.


























Template


Where it is used


RADIUS shared secret


When creating or configuring RADIUS clients, remote RADIUS server group members, RADIUS client templates, or remote RADIUS server templates


RADIUS clients


When creating or configuring RADIUS clients


Remote RADIUS servers


When creating or configuring remote RADIUS server group members


IP filters


When configuring IP Filters settings for a network policy


Health policies


When creating or configuring health policies


Remediation server groups


When creating or configuring remediation server groups



NAP Product Team

NPS templates in Windows Server 2008 R2

February 17th, 2009 Comments off

NPS templates, the flagship feature of NPS in Windows Server 2008 R2, provides a huge reduction in cost of ownership and deployment for all NPS environments. NPS templates separate common RADIUS configuration elements such as RADIUS shared secrets and RADIUS clients from the configuration running on the server. When referenced, the NPS setting inherits the values configured in the specified template. A change in the template changes the corresponding value in all of the places in which the template is referenced. For example, a single RADIUS shared secret template can be referenced for multiple RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers. When you change the RADIUS shared secret template, the change is inherited by all of the RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers in which that RADIUS shared secret template is referenced.


You can also use NPS templates to assist in configuration with referencing them. For example, you can create a RADIUS client template that contains common settings (such as the vendor type or shared secret) for a specific group of RADIUS clients (such as all wireless APs from a specific vendor). When you create a new RADIUS client, you can select the RADIUS client template to obtain the common settings. When you unselect the template, the inherited settings remain and you can configure individual settings, such as the RADIUS client’s IP address.


Note  Template settings are not supported by commands in the netsh nps context. Using netsh nps commands will remove the reference to the template and change the configuration element specified in the command.


NPS template settings can also be easily migrated and synchronized across multiple NPS servers.


The following types of configuration elements use templates:


·         RADIUS shared secret


·         RADIUS clients


·         Remote RADIUS servers


·         IP filters


·         Health policies


·         Remediation server groups


You can configure templates for these configuration elements from the Templates Management node of the Network Policy Server snap-in. The following figure shows an example.


Templates in the new NPS snap-in


For a larger version of this figure, click here.


Individual templates can be added, edited, duplicated, or deleted. After they are configured, they can be referenced and de-referenced in the appropriate dialog boxes in the Network Policy Server snap-in.


The following table lists the different types of templates and where they are used in the Network Policy Server snap-in.


























Template


Where it is used


RADIUS shared secret


When creating or configuring RADIUS clients, remote RADIUS server group members, RADIUS client templates, or remote RADIUS server templates


RADIUS clients


When creating or configuring RADIUS clients


Remote RADIUS servers


When creating or configuring remote RADIUS server group members


IP filters


When configuring IP Filters settings for a network policy


Health policies


When creating or configuring health policies


Remediation server groups


When creating or configuring remediation server groups



NAP Product Team

NPS templates in Windows Server 2008 R2

February 17th, 2009 No comments

NPS templates, the flagship feature of NPS in Windows Server 2008 R2, provides a huge reduction in cost of ownership and deployment for all NPS environments. NPS templates separate common RADIUS configuration elements such as RADIUS shared secrets and RADIUS clients from the configuration running on the server. When referenced, the NPS setting inherits the values configured in the specified template. A change in the template changes the corresponding value in all of the places in which the template is referenced. For example, a single RADIUS shared secret template can be referenced for multiple RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers. When you change the RADIUS shared secret template, the change is inherited by all of the RADIUS clients and remote RADIUS servers in which that RADIUS shared secret template is referenced.

You can also use NPS templates to assist in configuration with referencing them. For example, you can create a RADIUS client template that contains common settings (such as the vendor type or shared secret) for a specific group of RADIUS clients (such as all wireless APs from a specific vendor). When you create a new RADIUS client, you can select the RADIUS client template to obtain the common settings. When you unselect the template, the inherited settings remain and you can configure individual settings, such as the RADIUS client’s IP address.

Note  Template settings are not supported by commands in the netsh nps context. Using netsh nps commands will remove the reference to the template and change the configuration element specified in the command.

NPS template settings can also be easily migrated and synchronized across multiple NPS servers.

The following types of configuration elements use templates:

·         RADIUS shared secret

·         RADIUS clients

·         Remote RADIUS servers

·         IP filters

·         Health policies

·         Remediation server groups

You can configure templates for these configuration elements from the Templates Management node of the Network Policy Server snap-in. The following figure shows an example.

Templates in the new NPS snap-in

For a larger version of this figure, click here.

Individual templates can be added, edited, duplicated, or deleted. After they are configured, they can be referenced and de-referenced in the appropriate dialog boxes in the Network Policy Server snap-in.

The following table lists the different types of templates and where they are used in the Network Policy Server snap-in.

Template

Where it is used

RADIUS shared secret

When creating or configuring RADIUS clients, remote RADIUS server group members, RADIUS client templates, or remote RADIUS server templates

RADIUS clients

When creating or configuring RADIUS clients

Remote RADIUS servers

When creating or configuring remote RADIUS server group members

IP filters

When configuring IP Filters settings for a network policy

Health policies

When creating or configuring health policies

Remediation server groups

When creating or configuring remediation server groups

NAP Product Team

Tool for migrating IAS configuration settings to NPS is now available!

January 15th, 2009 No comments

Configuration settings for the Internet Authentication Service (IAS) in Windows Server 2003 are stored in .MDB files. Configuration settings for Network Policy Server (NPS) in Windows Server 2008 are stored in .XML files. If you install Windows Server 2008 on a computer already running Windows Server 2003 (known as an in-place upgrade), the configuration settings are automatically migrated from the .MDB to the .XML format.


When Windows Server 2008 shipped, there was no capability to export the configuration settings of an IAS server to a format that can be imported on a different NPS server. For example, if you wanted to replace an IAS server with an NPS server running on different computer, there was no direct way to migrate the settings of the IAS server to the new NPS server. IAS supports the export of its settings with the netsh aaaa show config > path\file.txt command. However, the format of the exported text file could not be used by the netsh nps import path\file.txt command on an NPS server.


To address this migration issue, the NPS product team is proud to announce the availability of a Windows Server 2008 hotfix that contains Iasmigreader.exe, a command-line tool that exports the configuration settings of IAS on a computer running Windows Server 2003 to an Ias.txt file. Ias.txt is in a format that can be imported on an NPS server running Windows Server 2008 with the netsh nps import path\ias.txt command.


See Microsoft Knowledge Base article 955995 for the hotfix and more information.


Download, export, import, and enjoy! 


 


Joe Davies
Senior Program Manager

Categories: Deployments, Downlevel OS Support, NPS Tags:

Tool for migrating IAS configuration settings to NPS is now available!

January 15th, 2009 No comments

Configuration settings for the Internet Authentication Service (IAS) in Windows Server 2003 are stored in .MDB files. Configuration settings for Network Policy Server (NPS) in Windows Server 2008 are stored in .XML files. If you install Windows Server 2008 on a computer already running Windows Server 2003 (known as an in-place upgrade), the configuration settings are automatically migrated from the .MDB to the .XML format.


When Windows Server 2008 shipped, there was no capability to export the configuration settings of an IAS server to a format that can be imported on a different NPS server. For example, if you wanted to replace an IAS server with an NPS server running on different computer, there was no direct way to migrate the settings of the IAS server to the new NPS server. IAS supports the export of its settings with the netsh aaaa show config > path\file.txt command. However, the format of the exported text file could not be used by the netsh nps import path\file.txt command on an NPS server.


To address this migration issue, the NPS product team is proud to announce the availability of a Windows Server 2008 hotfix that contains Iasmigreader.exe, a command-line tool that exports the configuration settings of IAS on a computer running Windows Server 2003 to an Ias.txt file. Ias.txt is in a format that can be imported on an NPS server running Windows Server 2008 with the netsh nps import path\ias.txt command.


See Microsoft Knowledge Base article 955995 for the hotfix and more information.


Download, export, import, and enjoy! 


 


Joe Davies
Senior Program Manager

Categories: Deployments, Downlevel OS Support, NPS Tags: