Archive

Archive for the ‘Azure Security’ Category

4 identity partnerships to help drive better security

May 28th, 2020 No comments

At Microsoft, we are committed to driving innovation for our partnerships within the identity ecosystem. Together, we are enabling our customers, who live and work in a heterogenous world, to get secure and remote access to the apps and resources they need. In this blog, we’d like to highlight how partners can help enable secure remote access to any app, access to on-prem and legacy apps, as well as how to secure seamless access via passwordless apps. We will also touch on how you can increase security visibility and insights by leveraging Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) Identity Protection APIs.

Secure remote access to cloud apps

As organizations adopt remote work strategies in today’s environment, it’s important their workforce has access to all the applications they need. With the Azure AD app gallery, we work closely with independent software vendors (ISV) to make it easy for organizations and their employees and customers to connect to and protect the applications they use. The Azure AD app gallery consists of thousands of applications that make it easy for admins to set up single sign-on (SSO) or user provisioning for their employees and customers. You can find popular collaboration applications to work remotely such Cisco Webex, Zoom, and Workplace from Facebook or security focused applications such as Mimecast, and Jamf. And if you don’t find the application your organization needs, you can always make a nomination here.

The Azure AD Gallery

The Azure AD Gallery.

Secure hybrid access to your on-premises and legacy apps

As organizations enable their employees to work from home, maintaining remote access to all company apps, including those on-premises and legacy, from any location and any device, is key to safeguard the productivity of their workforce. Azure AD offers several integrations for securing on-premises SaaS applications like SAP NetWeaver, SAP Fiori systems, Oracle PeopleSoft and E-Business Suite, and Atlassian JIRA and Confluence through the Azure AD App Gallery. For customers who are using Akamai Enterprise Application Access (EAA), Citrix Application Delivery Controller (ADC), F5 BIG-IP Access Policy Manager (APM), or Zscaler Private Access (ZPA), Microsoft has partnerships to provide remote access securely and help extend policies and controls that allow businesses to manage and govern on-premises legacy apps from Azure AD without having to change how the apps work.

Our integration with Zscaler allows a company’s business partners, such as suppliers and vendors, to securely access legacy, on-premises applications through the Zscaler B2B portal.

Integration with Zscaler

Go passwordless with FIDO2 security keys

Passwordless methods of authentication should be part of everyone’s future. Currently, Microsoft has over 100-million active passwordless end-users across consumer and enterprise customers. These passwordless options include Windows Hello for Business, Authenticator app, and FIDO2 security keys. Why are passwords falling out of favor? For them to be effective, passwords must have several characteristics, including being unique to every site. Trying to remember them all can frustrate end-users and lead to poor password hygiene.

Since Microsoft announced the public preview of Azure AD support for FIDO2 security keys in hybrid environments earlier this year, I’ve seen more organizations, especially with regulatory requirements, start to adopt FIDO2 security keys. This is another important area where we’ve worked with many FIDO2 security key partners who are helping our customers to go passwordless smoothly.

Partner logos

Increase security visibility and insights by leveraging Azure AD Identity Protection APIs

We know from our partners that they would like to leverage insights from the Azure AD Identity Protection with their security tools such as security information event management (SIEM) or network security. The end goal is to help them leverage all the security tools they have in an integrated way. Currently, we have the Azure AD Identity Protection API in preview that our ISVs leverage. For example, RSA announced at their 2020 conference that they are now leveraging our signals to better defend their customers.

We’re looking forward to working with many partners to complete these integrations.

If you haven’t taken advantage of any of these types of solutions, I recommend you try them out today and let us know what you think. If you have product partnership ideas with Azure AD, feel free to connect with me via LinkedIn or Twitter.

The post 4 identity partnerships to help drive better security appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Zero Trust and its role in securing the new normal

May 26th, 2020 No comments

As the global crisis around COVID-19 continues, security teams have been forced to adapt to a rapidly evolving security landscape. Schools, businesses, and healthcare organizations are all getting work done from home on a variety of devices and locations, extending the potential security attack surface.

While we continue to help our customers enable secure access to apps in this “new normal,” we’re also thinking about the road ahead and how there are still many organizations who will need to adapt their security model to support work life. This is especially important given that bad actors are using network access solutions like VPN as a trojan horse to deploy ransomware and the number of COVID-19 themed attacks have increased and evolved.

Microsoft and Zscaler have partnered to provide a glimpse into how security will change in a post-COVID-19 world.

Accelerating to Zero Trust

“We’ve seen two years’ worth of digital transformation in two months.”
—Satya Nadella, CEO, Microsoft

With the bulk of end users now working remotely, organizations were forced to consider alternate ways of achieving modern security controls. Legacy network architectures route all remote traffic through a central corporate datacenter are suddenly under enormous strain due to massive demand for remote work and rigid appliance capacity limitations. This creates latency for users, impacting productivity and requires additional appliances that can take 30, 60, or even 90 days just to be shipped out.

To avoid these challenges many organizations were able to enable work from home by transitioning their existing network infrastructure and capabilities with a Zero Trust security framework instead.

The Zero Trust framework empowers organizations to limit access to specific apps and resources only to the authorized users who are allowed to access them. The integrations between Microsoft Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) and Zscaler Private Access embody this framework.

For the companies who already had proof of concept underway for their Zero Trust journey, COVID-19 served as an accelerator, moving up the timelines for adoption. The ability to separate application access from network access, and secure application access based on identity and user context, such as date/time, geolocation, and device posture, was critical for IT’s ability to enable remote work. Cloud delivered technologies such as Azure AD and Zscaler Private Access (ZPA) have helped ensure fast deployment, scalability, and seamless experiences for remote users.

Both Microsoft and Zscaler anticipate that if not already moving toward a Zero Trust model, organizations will accelerate this transition and start to adopt one.

Securing flexible work going forward

While some organizations have had to support remote workers in the past, many are now forced to make the shift from a technical and cultural standpoint. As social distancing restrictions start to loosen, instead of remote everything we’ll begin to see organizations adopt more flexible work arrangements for their employees. Regardless of where employees are, they’ll need to be able to securely access any application, including the mission-critical “crown jewel” apps that may still be using legacy authentication protocols like HTTP or LDAP and on-premises. To simplify the management of protecting access to apps from a now flexible working style, there should be a single policy per user that can be used to provide access to an application, whether they are remote or at the headquarters

Zscaler Private Access and Azure AD help organizations enable single sign-on and enforce Conditional Access policies to ensure authorized users can securely access specifically the apps they need. This includes their mission-critical applications that run on-premises and may have SOC-2 and ISO27001 compliance needs.

Today, the combination of ZPA and Azure AD are already helping organizations adopt flexible work arrangements to ensure seamless and secure access to their applications.

Secure access with Zscaler and Microsoft

Remote onboarding or offboarding for a distributed workforce

With remote and flexible work arrangements becoming a norm, organizations will need to consider how to best onboard or offboard a distributed workforce and ensure the right access can be granted when employees join, change or leave roles. To minimize disruption, organizations will need to enable and secure Bring Your Own Devices (BYOD) or leverage solutions like Windows Autopilot that can help users set up new devices without any IT involvement.

To ensure employees can access applications on day one, automating the provisioning of user accounts to applications will be critical for productivity. The SCIM 2.0 standard, adopted by both Microsoft and Zscaler, can help automate simple actions, such as creating or updating users, adding users to groups, or deprovisioning users into applications. Azure AD user provisioning can help manage end-to-end identity lifecycle and automate policy-based provisioning and deprovisioning of user accounts for applications. The ZPA + Azure AD SCIM 2.0 configuration guide shows how this works.

Powering security going forward

Security and IT teams are already under strain with this new environment and adding an impending economic downturn into the equation means they’ll need to do more with less. The responsibility of selecting the right technology falls to the security leaders. Together, Microsoft and Zscaler can help deliver secure access to applications and data on all the devices accessing your network, while empowering employees with simpler, more productive experiences. This is the power of cloud and some of the industry’s deepest level of integrations. We look forward to working with on what your security might look like after COVID-19.

Stay safe.

For more information on Microsoft Zero Trust, visit our website: Zero Trust security framework. Learn more about our guidance related to COVID-19 here and bookmark the Security blog to keep up with our expert coverage on security matters. Also, follow us at @MSFTSecurity for the latest news and updates on cybersecurity.

The post Zero Trust and its role in securing the new normal appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Cybersecurity best practices to implement highly secured devices

May 20th, 2020 No comments

Almost three years ago, we published The Seven Properties of Highly Secured Devices, which introduced a new standard for IoT security and argued, based on an analysis of best-in-class devices, that seven properties must be present on every standalone device that connects to the internet in order to be considered secured. Azure Sphere, now generally available, is Microsoft’s entry into the market: a seven-properties-compliant, end-to-end product offering for building and deploying highly secured IoT devices.

Every connected device should be highly secured, even devices that seem simplistic, like a cactus watering sensor. The seven properties are always required. These details are captured in a new paper titled, Nineteen cybersecurity best practices used to implement the seven properties of highly secured devices in Azure Sphere. It focuses on why the seven properties are always required and describes best practices used to implement Azure Sphere. The paper provides detailed information about the architecture and implementation of Azure Sphere and discusses design decisions and trade-offs. We hope that the new paper can assist organizations and individuals in evaluating the measures used within Azure Sphere to improve the security of IoT devices. Companies may also want to use this paper as a reference, when assessing Azure Sphere or other IoT offerings.  In this blog post, we discuss one issue covered in the paper: why are the 7 properties always required?

Why are the seven properties applicable to every device that connects to the internet?

If an internet-connected device performs a non-critical function, why does it require all seven properties? Put differently, are the seven properties required only when a device might cause harm if it is hacked? Why would you still want to require an advanced CPU, a security subsystem, a hardware root of trust, and a set of services to secure a simple, innocuous device like a cactus water sensor?

Because any device can be the target of a hacker, and any hacked device can be weaponized.

Consider the Mirai botnet, a real-world example of IoT gone wrong. The Mirai botnet involved approximately 150,000 internet-enabled security cameras. The cameras were hacked and turned into a botnet that launched a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack that took down internet access for a large portion of the eastern United States. For security experts analyzing this hack, the Mirai botnet was distressingly unsophisticated. It was also a relatively small-scale attack, considering that many IoT devices will sell more than 150,000 units.

Adding internet connectivity to a class of device means a single, remote attack can scale to hundreds of thousands or millions of devices. The ability to scale a single exploit to this degree is cause for reflection on the upheaval IoT brings to the marketplace. Once the decision is made to connect a device to the internet, that device has the potential to transform from a single-purpose device to a general-purpose computer capable of launching a DDoS attack against any target in the world. The Mirai botnet is also a demonstration that a manufacturer does not need to sell many devices to create the potential for a “weaponized” device.

IoT security is not only about “safety-critical” deployments. Any deployment of a connected device at scale requires the seven properties. In other words, the function, purpose, and cost of a device should not be the only considerations when deciding whether security is important.

The seven properties do not guarantee that a device will not be hacked. However, they greatly minimize certain classes of threats and make it possible to detect and respond when a hacker gains a toehold in a device ecosystem. If a device doesn’t have all seven, human practices must be implemented to compensate for the missing features. For example, without renewable security, a security incident will require disconnecting devices from the internet and then recalling those devices or dispatching people to manually patch every device that was attacked.

Implementation challenges

Some of the seven properties, such as a hardware-based root of trust and compartmentalization, require certain silicon features. Others, such as defense in-depth, require a certain software architecture as well as silicon features like the hardware-based root of trust. Finally, other properties, including renewable security, certificate-based authentication, and failure reporting, require not only silicon features and certain software architecture choices within the operating system, but also deep integration with cloud services. Piecing these critical pieces of infrastructure together is difficult and prone to errors. Ensuring that a device incorporates these properties could therefore increase its cost.

These challenges led us to believe the seven properties also created an opportunity for security-minded organizations to implement these properties as a platform, which would free device manufacturers to focus on product features, rather than security. Azure Sphere represents such a platform: the seven properties are designed and built into the product from the silicon up.

Best practices for implementing the seven properties

Based on our decades of experience researching and implementing secured products, we identified 19 best practices that were put into place as part of the Azure Sphere product. These best practices provide insight into why Azure Sphere sets such a high standard for security. Read the full paper, Nineteen cybersecurity best practices used to implement the seven properties of highly secured devices in Azure Sphere, for the in-depth discussion of each of these best practices and how they—along with the seven properties themselves—guided our design decisions.

We hope that the discussion of these best practices sheds some additional light on the large number of features the Azure Sphere team implemented to protect IoT devices. We also hope that this provides a new set of questions to consider in evaluating your own IoT solution. Azure Sphere will continue to innovate and build upon this foundation with more features that raise the bar in IoT security.

To read previous blogs on IoT security, visit our blog series:  https://www.microsoft.com/security/blog/iot-security/   Be sure to bookmark the Security blog to keep up with our expert coverage on security matters. Also, follow us at @MSFTSecurity for the latest news and updates on cybersecurity

The post Cybersecurity best practices to implement highly secured devices appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Microsoft Build brings new innovations and capabilities to keep developers and customers secure

May 19th, 2020 No comments

As both organizations and developers adapt to the new reality of working and collaborating in a remote environment, it’s more important than ever to ensure that their experiences are secure and trusted. As part of this week’s Build virtual event, we’re introducing new Identity innovation to help foster a secure and trustworthy app ecosystem, as well as announcing a number of new capabilities in Azure to help secure customers.

New Identity capabilities to help foster a secure apps ecosystem

As organizations continue to adapt to the new requirements of remote work, we’ve seen an increase in the deployment and usage of cloud applications. These cloud applications often need access to user or company data, which has increased the need to provide strong security not just for users but applications themselves. Today we are announcing several capabilities for developers, admins, and end-users that help foster a secure and trustworthy app ecosystem:

  1. Publisher Verification allows developers to demonstrate to customers, with a verified checkmark, that the application they’re using comes from a trusted and authentic source. Applications marked as publisher verified means that the publisher has verified their identity through the verification process with the Microsoft Partner Network (MPN) and has associated their MPN account with their application registration.
  2. Application consent policies allow admins to configure policies that determine which applications users can consent to. Admins can allow users to consent to applications that have been Publisher Verified, helping developers unlock user-driven adoption of their apps.
  3. Microsoft authentication libraries (MSAL) for Angular is generally available and our web library identity.web for ASP.NET Core is in public preview. MSAL make it easy to implement the right authentication patterns, security features, and integration points that support any Microsoft identity—from Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) accounts to Microsoft accounts.

In addition, we’re making it easier for organizations and developers to secure, manage and build apps that connect with different types of users outside an organization with Azure AD External Identities now in preview. With Azure AD External Identities, developers can build flexible, user-centric experiences that enable self-service sign-up and sign-in and allow continuous customization without duplicating coding effort.

You can learn even more about our Identity-based solutions and additional announcements by heading over to the Azure Active Directory Tech Community blog and reading Alex Simons’ post.

Azure Security Center innovations

Azure Security Center is a unified infrastructure security management system for both Azure and hybrid cloud resources on-premises or in other clouds. We’re pleased to announce two new innovations for Azure Security Center, both of which will help secure our customers:

First, we’re announcing that the Azure Secure Score API is now available to customers, bringing even more innovation to Secure Score, which is a central component of security posture management in Azure Security Center. The recent enhancements to Secure Score (in preview) gives customers an easier to understand and more effective way to assess risk in their environment and prioritize which action to take first in order to reduce it.  It also simplifies the long list of findings by grouping the recommendations into a set of Security Controls, each representing an attack surface and scored accordingly.

Second, we’re announcing that suppression rules for Azure Security Center alerts are now publicly available. Customers can use suppression rules to reduce alerts fatigue and focus on the most relevant threats by hiding alerts that are known to be innocuous or related to normal activities in their organization. Suppressed alerts will be hidden in Azure Security Center and Azure Sentinel but will still be available with ‘dismissed’ state. You can learn more about suppression rules by visiting Suppressing alerts from Azure Security Center’s threat protection.

Azure Disk Encryption and encryption & key management updates

We continue to invest in encryption options for our customers. Here are our most recent updates:

  1. Fifty more Azure services now support customer-managed keys for encryption at rest. This helps customers control their encryption keys to meet their compliance or regulatory requirements. The full list of services is here. We have now made this capability part of the Azure Security Benchmark, so that our customers can govern use of all your Azure services in a consistent manner.
  2. Azure Disk Encryption helps protect data on disks that are used with VM and VM Scale sets, and we have now added the ability to use Azure Disk Encryption to secure Red Hat Enterprise Linux BYOS Gold Images. The subscription must be registered before Azure Disk Encryption can be enabled.

Azure Key Vault innovation

Azure Key Vault is a unified service for secret management, certificate management, and encryption key management, backed by FIPS-validated hardware security modules (HSMs). Here are some of the new capabilities we are bringing for our customers:

  1. Enhanced security with Private Link—This is an optional control that enables customers to access their Azure Key Vault over a private endpoint in their virtual network. Traffic between their virtual network and Azure Key Vault flows over the Microsoft backbone network, thus providing additional assurance.
  2. More choices for BYOK—Some of our customers generate encryption keys outside Azure and import them into Azure Key Vault, in order to meet their regulatory needs or to centralize where their keys are generated. Now, in addition to nCipher nShield HSMs, they can also use SafeNet Luna HSMs or Fortanix SDKMS to generate their keys. These additions are in preview.
  3. Make it easier to rotate secrets—Earlier we released a public preview of notifications for keys, secrets, and certificates. This allows customers to receive events at each point of the lifecycle of these objects and define custom actions. A common action is rotating secrets on a schedule so that they can limit the impact of credential exposure. You can see the new tutorial here.

Platform security innovation

Platform security for customers’ data recently took a big step forward with the General Availability of Azure Confidential Computing. Using the latest Intel SGX CPU hardware backed by attestation, Azure provides a new class of VMs that protects the confidentiality and integrity of customer data while in memory (or “in-use”), ensuring that cloud administrators and datacenter operators with physical access to the servers cannot access the customer’s data.

Customer Lockbox for Microsoft Azure provides an interface for customers to review and approve or reject customer data access requests. It is used in cases where a Microsoft engineer needs to access customer data during a support request. In addition to expanded coverage of services in Customer Lockbox for Microsoft Azure, this feature is now available in preview for our customers in Azure Government cloud.

You can learn more about our Azure security offerings by heading to the Azure Security Center Tech Community.

The post Microsoft Build brings new innovations and capabilities to keep developers and customers secure appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Open-sourcing new COVID-19 threat intelligence

May 14th, 2020 No comments

A global threat requires a global response. While the world faces the common threat of COVID-19, defenders are working overtime to protect users all over the globe from cybercriminals using COVID-19 as a lure to mount attacks. As a security intelligence community, we are stronger when we share information that offers a more complete view of attackers’ shifting techniques. This more complete view enables us all to be more proactive in protecting, detecting, and defending against attacks.

At Microsoft, our security products provide built-in protections against these and other threats, and we’ve published detailed guidance to help organizations combat current threats (Responding to COVID-19 together). Our threat experts are sharing examples of malicious lures and we have enabled guided hunting of COVID-themed threats using Azure Sentinel Notebooks. Microsoft processes trillions of signals each day across identities, endpoint, cloud, applications, and email, which provides visibility into a broad range of COVID-19-themed attacks, allowing us to detect, protect, and respond to them across our entire security stack. Today, we take our COVID-19 threat intelligence sharing a step further by making some of our own indicators available publicly for those that are not already protected by our solutions. Microsoft Threat Protection (MTP) customers are already protected against the threats identified by these indicators across endpoints with Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) and email with Office 365 ATP.

In addition, we are publishing these indicators for those not protected by Microsoft Threat Protection to raise awareness of attackers’ shift in techniques, how to spot them, and how to enable your own custom hunting. These indicators are now available in two ways. They are available in the Azure Sentinel GitHub and through the Microsoft Graph Security API. For enterprise customers who use MISP for storing and sharing threat intelligence, these indicators can easily be consumed via a MISP feed.

This threat intelligence is provided for use by the wider security community, as well as customers who would like to perform additional hunting, as we all defend against malicious actors seeking to exploit the COVID crisis.

This COVID-specific threat intelligence feed represents a start at sharing some of Microsoft’s COVID-related IOCs. We will continue to explore ways to improve the data over the duration of the crisis. While some threats and actors are still best defended more discreetly, we are committed to greater transparency and taking community feedback on what types of information is most useful to defenders in protecting against COVID-related threats. This is a time-limited feed. We are maintaining this feed through the peak of the outbreak to help organizations focus on recovery.

Protection in Azure Sentinel and Microsoft Threat Protection

Today’s release includes file hash indicators related to email-based attachments identified as malicious and attempting to trick users with COVID-19 or Coronavirus-themed lures. The guidance below provides instructions on how to access and integrate this feed in your own environment.

For Azure Sentinel customers, these indicators can be either be imported directly into Azure Sentinel using a Playbook or accessed directly from queries.

The Azure Sentinel Playbook that Microsoft has authored will continuously monitor and import these indicators directly into your Azure Sentinel ThreatIntelligenceIndicator table. This Playbook will match with your event data and generate security incidents when the built-in threat intelligence analytic templates detect activity associated to these indicators.

These indicators can also be accessed directly from Azure Sentinel queries as follows:

let covidIndicators = (externaldata(TimeGenerated:datetime, FileHashValue:string, FileHashType: string )
[@"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Azure/Azure-Sentinel/master/Sample%20Data/Feeds/Microsoft.Covid19.Indicators.csv"]
with (format="csv"));
covidIndicators

Azure Sentinel logs.

A sample detection query is also provided in the Azure Sentinel GitHub. With the table definition above, it is as simple as:

  1. Join the indicators against the logs ingested into Azure Sentinel as follows:
covidIndicators
| join ( CommonSecurityLog | where TimeGenerated >= ago(7d)
| where isnotempty(FileHashValue)
) on $left.FileHashValue == $right.FileHash
  1. Then, select “New alert rule” to configure Azure Sentinel to raise incidents based on this query returning results.

CyberSecurityDemo in Azure Sentinel logs.

You should begin to see Alerts in Azure Sentinel for any detections related to these COVID threat indicators.

Microsoft Threat Protection provides protection for the threats associated with these indicators. Attacks with these Covid-19-themed indicators are blocked by Office 365 ATP and Microsoft Defender ATP.

While MTP customers are already protected, they can also make use of these indicators for additional hunting scenarios using the MTP Advanced Hunting capabilities.

Here is a hunting query to see if any process created a file matching a hash on the list.

let covidIndicators = (externaldata(TimeGenerated:datetime, FileHashValue:string, FileHashType: string )
[@"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Azure/Azure-Sentinel/master/Sample%20Data/Feeds/Microsoft.Covid19.Indicators.csv"]
with (format="csv"))
| where FileHashType == 'sha256' and TimeGenerated > ago(1d);
covidIndicators
| join (DeviceFileEvents
| where Timestamp > ago(1d)
| where ActionType == 'FileCreated'
| take 100) on $left.FileHashValue  == $right.SHA256

Advanced hunting in Microsoft Defender Security Center.

This is an Advanced Hunting query in MTP that searches for any recipient of an attachment on the indicator list and sees if any recent anomalous log-ons happened on their machine. While COVID threats are blocked by MTP, users targeted by these threats may be at risk for non-COVID related attacks and MTP is able to join data across device and email to investigate them.

let covidIndicators = (externaldata(TimeGenerated:datetime, FileHashValue:string, FileHashType: string )    [@"https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Azure/Azure-Sentinel/master/Sample%20Data/Feeds/Microsoft.Covid19.Indicators.csv"] with (format="csv"))
| where FileHashType == 'sha256' and TimeGenerated > ago(1d);
covidIndicators
| join (  EmailAttachmentInfo  | where Timestamp > ago(1d)
| project NetworkMessageId , SHA256
) on $left.FileHashValue  == $right.SHA256
| join (
EmailEvents
| where Timestamp > ago (1d)
) on NetworkMessageId
| project TimeEmail = Timestamp, Subject, SenderFromAddress, AccountName = tostring(split(RecipientEmailAddress, "@")[0])
| join (
DeviceLogonEvents
| project LogonTime = Timestamp, AccountName, DeviceName
) on AccountName
| where (LogonTime - TimeEmail) between (0min.. 90min)
| take 10

Advanced hunting in Microsoft 365 security.

Connecting an MISP instance to Azure Sentinel

The indicators published on the Azure Sentinel GitHub page can be consumed directly via MISP’s feed functionality. We have published details on doing this at this URL: https://aka.ms/msft-covid19-misp. Please refer to the Azure Sentinel documentation on connecting data from threat intelligence providers.

Using the indicators if you are not an Azure Sentinel or MTP customer

Yes, the Azure Sentinel GitHub is public: https://aka.ms/msft-covid19-Indicators

Examples of phishing campaigns in this threat intelligence

The following is a small sample set of the types of COVID-themed phishing lures using email attachments that will be represented in this feed. Beneath each screenshot are the relevant hashes and metadata.

Figure 1: Spoofing WHO branding with “cure” and “vaccine” messaging with a malicious .gz file.

Name: CURE FOR CORONAVIRUS_pdf.gz

World Health Organization phishing email.

Figure 2: Spoofing Red Cross Safety Tips with malicious .docm file.

Name: COVID-19 SAFETY TIPS.docm

Red Cross phishing email.

Figure 3: South African banking lure promoting COVID-19 financial relief with malicious .html files.

Name: SBSA-COVID-19-Financial Relief.html

Financial relief phishing email.

Figure 4: French language spoofed correspondence from the WHO with malicious XLS Macro file.

Name:✉-Covid-19 Relief Plan5558-23636sd.htm

Coronavirus-themed phishing email.

If you have questions or feedback on this COVID-19 feed, please email msft-covid19-ti@microsoft.com.

The post Open-sourcing new COVID-19 threat intelligence appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Zero Trust Deployment Guide for Microsoft Azure Active Directory

April 30th, 2020 No comments

Microsoft is providing a series of deployment guides for customers who have engaged in a Zero Trust security strategy. In this guide, we cover how to deploy and configure Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) capabilities to support your Zero Trust security strategy.

For simplicity, this document will focus on ideal deployments and configuration. We will call out the integrations that need Microsoft products other than Azure AD and we will note the licensing needed within Azure AD (Premium P1 vs P2), but we will not describe multiple solutions (one with a lower license and one with a higher license).

Azure AD at the heart of your Zero Trust strategy

Azure AD provides critical functionality for your Zero Trust strategy. It enables strong authentication, a point of integration for device security, and the core of your user-centric policies to guarantee least-privileged access. Azure AD’s Conditional Access capabilities are the policy decision point for access to resources based on user identity, environment, device health, and risk—verified explicitly at the point of access. In the following sections, we will showcase how you can implement your Zero Trust strategy with Azure AD.

Establish your identity foundation with Azure AD

A Zero Trust strategy requires that we verify explicitly, use least privileged access principles, and assume breach. Azure Active Directory can act as the policy decision point to enforce your access policies based on insights on the user, device, target resource, and environment. To do this, we need to put Azure Active Directory in the path of every access request—connecting every user and every app or resource through this identity control plane. In addition to productivity gains and improved user experiences from single sign-on (SSO) and consistent policy guardrails, connecting all users and apps provides Azure AD with the signal to make the best possible decisions about the authentication/authorization risk.

  • Connect your users, groups, and devices:
    Maintaining a healthy pipeline of your employees’ identities as well as the necessary security artifacts (groups for authorization and devices for extra access policy controls) puts you in the best place to use consistent identities and controls, which your users already benefit from on-premises and in the cloud:

    1. Start by choosing the right authentication option for your organization. While we strongly prefer to use an authentication method that primarily uses Azure AD (to provide you the best brute force, DDoS, and password spray protection), follow our guidance on making the decision that’s right for your organization and your compliance needs.
    2. Only bring the identities you absolutely need. For example, use going to the cloud as an opportunity to leave behind service accounts that only make sense on-premises; leave on-premises privileged roles behind (more on that under privileged access), etc.
    3. If your enterprise has more than 100,000 users, groups, and devices combined, we recommend you follow our guidance building a high performance sync box that will keep your life cycle up-to-date.
  • Integrate all your applications with Azure AD:
    As mentioned earlier, SSO is not only a convenient feature for your users, but it’s also a security posture, as it prevents users from leaving copies of their credentials in various apps and helps avoid them getting used to surrendering their credentials due to excessive prompting. Make sure you do not have multiple IAM engines in your environment. Not only does this diminish the amount of signal that Azure AD sees and allow bad actors to live in the seams between the two IAM engines, it can also lead to poor user experience and your business partners becoming the first doubters of your Zero Trust strategy. Azure AD supports a variety of ways you can bring apps to authenticate with it:

    1. Integrate modern enterprise applications that speak OAuth2.0 or SAML.
    2. For Kerberos and Form-based auth applications, you can integrate them using the Azure AD Application Proxy.
    3. If you publish your legacy applications using application delivery networks/controllers, Azure AD is able to integrate with most of the major ones (such as Citrix, Akamai, F5, etc.).
    4. To help migrate your apps off of existing/older IAM engines, we provide a number of resources—including tools to help you discover and migrate apps off of ADFS.
  • Automate provisioning to applications:
    Once you have your users’ identities in Azure AD, you can now use Azure AD to power pushing those user identities into your various cloud applications. This gives you a tighter identity lifecycle integration within those apps. Use this detailed guide to deploy provisioning into your SaaS applications.
  • Get your logging and reporting in order:
    As you build your estate in Azure AD with authentication, authorization, and provisioning, it’s important to have strong operational insights into what is happening in the directory. Follow this guide to learn how to to persist and analyze the logs from Azure AD either in Azure or using a SIEM system of choice.

Enacting the 1st principle: least privilege

Giving the right access at the right time to only those who need it is at the heart of a Zero Trust philosophy:

  • Plan your Conditional Access deployment:
    Planning your Conditional Access policies in advance and having a set of active and fallback policies is a foundational pillar of your Access Policy enforcement in a Zero Trust deployment. Take the time to configure your trusted IP locations in your environment. Even if you do not use them in a Conditional Access policy, configure these IPs informs the risk of Identity Protection mentioned above. Check out our deployment guidance and best practices for resilient Conditional Access policies.
  • Secure privileged access with privileged identity management:
    With privileged access, you generally take a different track to meeting the end users where they are most likely to need and use the data. You typically want to control the devices, conditions, and credentials that users use to access privileged operations/roles. Check out our detailed guidance on how to take control of your privileged identities and secure them. Keep in mind that in a digitally transformed organization, privileged access is not only administrative access, but also application owner or developer access that can change the way your mission critical apps run and handle data. Check out our detailed guide on how to use Privileged Identity Management (P2) to secure privileged identities.
  • Restrict user consent to applications:
    User consent to applications is a very common way for modern applications to get access to organizational resources. However, we recommend you restrict user consent and manage consent requests to ensure that no unnecessary exposure of your organization’s data to apps occurs. This also means that you need to review prior/existing consent in your organization for any excessive or malicious consent.
  • Manage entitlements (Azure AD Premium P2):
    With applications centrally authenticating and driven from Azure AD, you should streamline your access request, approval, and recertification process to make sure that the right people have the right access and that you have a trail of why users in your organization have the access they have. Using entitlement management, you can create access packages that they can request as they join different teams/project and that would assign them access to the associated resources (applications, SharePoint sites, group memberships). Check out how you can start a package. If deploying entitlement management is not possible for your organization at this time, we recommend you at least enable self-service paradigms in your organization by deploying self-service group management and self-service application access.

Enacting the 2nd principle: verify explicitly

Provide Azure AD with a rich set of credentials and controls that it can use to verify the user at all times.

  • Roll out Azure multi-factor authentication (MFA) (P1):
    This is a foundational piece of reducing user session risk. As users appear on new devices and from new locations, being able to respond to an MFA challenge is one of the most direct ways that your users can teach us that these are familiar devices/locations as they move around the world (without having administrators parse individual signals). Check out this deployment guide.
  • Enable Azure AD Hybrid Join or Azure AD Join:
    If you are managing the user’s laptop/computer, bringing that information into Azure AD and use it to help make better decisions. For example, you may choose to allow rich client access to data (clients that have offline copies on the computer) if you know the user is coming from a machine that your organization controls and manages. If you do not bring this in, you will likely choose to block access from rich clients, which may result in your users working around your security or using Shadow IT. Check out our resources for Azure AD Hybrid Join or Azure AD Join.
  • Enable Microsoft Intune for managing your users’ mobile devices (EMS):
    The same can be said about user mobile devices as laptops. The more you know about them (patch level, jailbroken, rooted, etc.) the more you are able to trust or mistrust them and provide a rationale for why you block/allow access. Check out our Intune device enrollment guide to get started.
  • Start rolling out passwordless credentials:
    With Azure AD now supporting FIDO 2.0 and passwordless phone sign-in, you can move the needle on the credentials that your users (especially sensitive/privileged users) are using on a day-to-day basis. These credentials are strong authentication factors that can mitigate risk as well. Our passwordless authentication deployment guide walks you through how to roll out passwordless credentials in your organization.

Enacting the 3rd principle: assume breach

Provide Azure AD with a rich set of credentials and controls that it can use to verify the user.

  • Deploy Azure AD Password Protection:
    While enabling other methods to verify users explicitly, you should not forget about weak passwords, password spray and breach replay attacks. Read this blog to find out why classic complex password policies are not tackling the most prevalent password attacks. Then follow this guidance to enable Azure AD Password Protection for your users in the cloud first and then on-premises as well.
  • Block legacy authentication:
    One of the most common attack vectors for malicious actors is to use stolen/replayed credentials against legacy protocols, such as SMTP, that cannot do modern security challenges. We recommend you block legacy authentication in your organization.
  • Enable identity protection (Azure AD Premium 2):
    Enabling identity protection for your users will provide you with more granular session/user risk signal. You’ll be able to investigate risk and confirm compromise or dismiss the signal which will help the engine understand better what risk looks like in your environment.
  • Enable restricted session to use in access decisions:
    To illustrate, let’s take a look at controls in Exchange Online and SharePoint Online (P1): When a user’s risk is low but they are signing in from an unknown device, you may want to allow them access to critical resources, but not allow them to do things that leave your organization in a non-compliant state. Now you can configure Exchange Online and SharePoint Online to offer the user a restricted session that allows them to read emails or view files, but not download them and save them on an untrusted device. Check out our guides for enabling limited access with SharePoint Online and Exchange Online.
  • Enable Conditional Access integration with Microsoft Cloud App Security (MCAS) (E5):
    Using signals emitted after authentication and with MCAS proxying requests to application, you will be able to monitor sessions going to SaaS Applications and enforce restrictions. Check out our MCAS and Conditional Access integration guidance and see how this can even be extended to on-premises apps.
  • Enable Microsoft Cloud App Security (MCAS) integration with identity protection (E5):
    Microsoft Cloud App Security is a UEBA product monitoring user behavior inside SaaS and modern applications. This gives Azure AD signal and awareness about what happened to the user after they authenticated and received a token. If the user pattern starts to look suspicious (user starts to download gigabytes of data from OneDrive or starts to send spam emails in Exchange Online), then a signal can be fed to Azure AD notifying it that the user seems to be compromised or high risk and on the next access request from this user; Azure AD can take correct action to verify the user or block them. Just enabling MCAS monitoring will enrich the identity protection signal. Check out our integration guidance to get started.
  • Integrate Azure Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) with Microsoft Cloud App Security:
    Once you’ve successfully deployed and configured Azure ATP, enable the integration with Microsoft Cloud App Security to bring on-premises signal into the risk signal we know about the user. This enables Azure AD to know that a user is indulging in risky behavior while accessing on-premises, non-modern resources (like File Shares) which can then be factored into overall user risk to block further access in the cloud. You will be able to see a combined Priority Score for each user at risk to give a holistic view of which ones your SOC should focus on.
  • Enable Microsoft Defender ATP (E5):
    Microsoft Defender ATP allows you to attest to Windows machines health and whether they are undergoing a compromise and feed that into mitigating risk at runtime. Whereas Domain Join gives you a sense of control, Defender ATP allows you to react to a malware attack at near real time by detecting patterns where multiple user devices are hitting untrustworthy sites and react by raising their device/user risk at runtime. See our guidance on configuring Conditional Access in Defender ATP.

Conclusion

We hope the above guides help you deploy the identity pieces central to a successful Zero Trust strategy. Make sure to check out the other deployment guides in the series by following the Microsoft Security blog.

The post Zero Trust Deployment Guide for Microsoft Azure Active Directory appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Managing risk in today’s IoT landscape: not a one-and-done

April 28th, 2020 No comments

image for Halina's Blog Post_updated-BANNER

The reality of securing IoT over time

It’s difficult to imagine any aspect of everyday life that isn’t affected by the influence of connectivity. The number of businesses that are using IoT is growing at a fast pace. By 2021, approximately 94 percent of businesses will be using IoT. Connectivity empowers organizations to unlock the full potential of the Internet of Things (IoT)—but it also introduces new cybersecurity attack vectors that they didn’t need to think about before. The reality is, connectivity comes at a cost: attackers with a wide range of motivations and skills are on the hunt, eager to exploit vulnerabilities or weak links in IoT. What does it take to manage those risks?

The cybersecurity threat landscape is ever evolving so a solution’s protection must also evolve regularly in order to remain effective. Securing a device is neither a one-time action nor is it a problem that is solely technical in nature. Implementing robust security measures upfront is not enough—risks need to be mitigated not just once, but constantly and throughout the full lifespan of a device. Facing this threat landscape ultimately means acknowledging that organizations will have to confront the consequences of attacks and newfound vulnerabilities. The question is, how to manage those risks beyond the technical measures that are in place?

A holistic approach to minimizing risk

Securing IoT devices against cyberattacks requires a holistic approach that complements up-front technical measures with ongoing practices that allow organizations to evaluate risks and establish a set of actions and policies that minimize threats over time. Cybersecurity is a multi-dimensional issue that requires the provider of an IoT solution to take several variables into account—it is not just the technology, but also the people who create and manage a product and the processes and practices they put in place, that will determine how resilient it is.

With Azure Sphere, we provide our customers with a robust defense that utilizes the evidence and learnings documented in the Seven Properties of Highly Secured Devices. One of the properties, renewable security, ensures that a device can update to a more secure state even after it has been compromised. As the threat landscape evolves, renewable security also enables us to counter new attack vectors through updates. This is essential, but not sufficient on its own. Our technology investments are enhanced through similar investments in security assurance and risk management that permeate all levels of an organization. The following sections highlight three key elements of our holistic approach to IoT security: continuous evaluation of our security promise, leveraging the power of the security community, and combining cyber and organizational resilience. 

Continuous evaluation of our security promise

All cyberattacks fall somewhere on a spectrum of complexity. On one side of the spectrum are simple and opportunistic attacks. Examples are off-the-shelf malware or attempts to steal data such as credentials. These attacks are usually performed by attackers with limited resources. On the opposite side of the spectrum are threat actors that use highly sophisticated methods to target specific parts of the system. Attackers within this category usually have many resources and can pursue an attack over a longer period of time. Given the multitude of threats across this spectrum, it is important to keep in mind that they all have one thing in common: an attacker faces relatively low risk with potentially very large rewards.

Taking this into account, we believe that in order to protect our customers we need to practice being our own worst enemy. This means our goal is to discover any vulnerabilities before the bad guys do. One proven approach is to test our solution from the same perspective as an attacker. So-called “red teams” are designed to emulate the attacks of adversaries, whereas “purple teams” perform both attacking and defending to harden a product from within.

Our approach to red team exercises is to try to mimic the threat landscape that devices are actually facing. We do this multiple times a year and across the full Azure Sphere stack. This means that our customers benefit from the rigorous security testing of our platform and are able to focus on the security of their own applications. We work with the world’s most renowned security service providers to test our product with a real-world attacker mentality for an extended period of time and from multiple perspectives. In addition, we leverage the full power of Microsoft internal security expertise to conduct regular internal red and purple team exercises. The practice of constantly evaluating our defense and emulating the ever-evolving threat landscape is an important part of our security hygiene—allowing us to find vulnerabilities, update all devices, and mitigate incidents before they even happen.

Leveraging the power of the security community

Another approach to finding vulnerabilities before attackers do is to engage with the cybersecurity community through bounty programs. We encourage security researchers with an interest in Azure Sphere to search for any vulnerabilities and we reward them for it. While our approach to red team exercises ensures regular testing of how we secure Azure Sphere, we also believe in the advantages of the continual and diverse assessment by anyone who is interested, at any point in time.

Security researchers play a significant role in securing our billions of customers across Microsoft, and we encourage the responsible reporting of vulnerabilities based on our Coordinated Vulnerability Disclosure (CVD). We invite researchers from across the world to look for and report any vulnerability through our Microsoft Azure Bounty Program. Depending on the quality of submissions and the level of severity, we award successful reports with up to $40,000 USD. We believe that researchers should be rewarded competitively when they improve the security of our platform, and we maintain these important relationships for the benefit of our customers.

From a risk management perspective, both red and purple team exercises and bug bounties are helpful tools to minimize the risk of attacks. But what happens when an IoT solution provider is confronted with a newly discovered security vulnerability? Not every organization has a cybersecurity incident response plan in place, and 77 percent of businesses do not have a consistently deployed plan. Finding vulnerabilities is important, but it is equally important to prepare employees and equip the organization with processes and practices that allow for a quick and efficient resolution as soon as a vulnerability is found.

Combining cyber and organizational resilience

Securing IoT is not just about preventing attackers from getting in; it’s also about how to respond when they do. Once the technical barrier has been passed, it is the resilience of the organization that the device has to fall back on. Therefore, it is essential to have a plan in place that allows your team to quickly respond and restore security. There are countless possible considerations and moving parts that must all fit together seamlessly as part of a successful cybersecurity incident response. Every organization is different and there is no one-size-fits-all, but a good place to start is with industry best practices such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Computer Security Incident Handling Guide. Azure Sphere’s standard operating procedures are aligned with those guidelines, in addition to leveraging Microsoft battle-tested corporate infrastructure.

Microsoft Security Response Center (MSRC) has been at the front line of security response for more than twenty years. Over time we have learned what it means to successfully protect our customers from harm from vulnerabilities in our products, and we are able to rapidly drive back attacks against our cloud infrastructure. Security researchers and customers are provided with an easy way to report any vulnerabilities and MSRC best-in-class security experts are monitoring communications 24/7 to make sure we can fix an issue as soon as possible.

Your people are a critical asset—when they’re educated on how to respond when an incident occurs, their actions can make all the difference. In addition to MSRC capabilities that are available at any time, we require everyone involved in security incident response to undergo regular and extensive training. Trust is easy to build when things are going right. What really matters in the long term is how we build trust when things go wrong. Our security response practices have been defined with that in mind.

Our commitment to managing the risks you are facing

The world will be more connected than it has ever been, and we believe this requires a strong, holistic, and ongoing focus on cybersecurity. Defending against today’s and tomorrow’s IoT threat landscape is not a static game. It requires continual assessment of our promise to secure your IoT solutions, innovation that improves our defense over time, and working with you and the security community. As the threat landscape evolves, so will we. Azure Sphere’s mission is to empower every organization on the planet to connect and create secured and trustworthy IoT devices. When you choose Azure Sphere, you can rely on our team and Microsoft to manage your risk so that you can focus on the true business value of your IoT solutions and products.

If you are interested in learning more about how Azure Sphere can help you securely unlock your next IoT innovation:

The post Managing risk in today’s IoT landscape: not a one-and-done appeared first on Microsoft Security.

MITRE ATT&CK APT 29 evaluation proves Microsoft Threat Protection provides deeper end to end view of advanced threats

April 21st, 2020 No comments

As attackers use more advanced techniques, it’s even more important that defenders have visibility not just into each of the domains in their environment, but also across them to piece together coordinated, targeted, and advanced attacks. This level of visibility will allow us to get ahead of attackers and close the gaps through which they enter. To illustrate that imperative, the 2019 MITRE ATT&CK evaluation centered on an advanced nation-state threat actor known to the industry as Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) 29 (also known as Cozy Bear) which largely overlaps with the activity group that Microsoft calls YTTRIUM. . The test involved a simulation of 58 attacker techniques in 10 kill chain categories.

Microsoft participated in the second MITRE ATT&CK endpoint detection product evaluation published today. The evaluation is designed to test security products based on the ATT&CK (Adversarial Tactics, Techniques & Common Knowledge) framework, which is highly regarded in the security industry as one of the most comprehensive catalog of attacker techniques and tactics. Threat hunters use this framework to look for specific techniques that attackers often use to penetrate defenses. Testing that incorporates a comprehensive view of an environment’s ability to monitor and detect malicious activity with the existing tools that defenders have deployed across an organization is critical.

Although this test was focused on endpoint detection and response, MITRE ran the simulated APT29 attack from end to end and across multiple attack domains, meaning defenders benefited from visibility beyond just endpoint protection. This gave Microsoft the unique opportunity to bring Microsoft Threat Protection (MTP) to the test.

Microsoft Threat Protection expands Microsoft Defender ATP from endpoint detection and response (EDR) to an extended detection and response (XDR) solution, and is designed to provide extended detection and response by combining protection for endpoints (Microsoft Defender ATP), email and productivity tools (Office 365 ATP), identity (Azure ATP), and cloud applications (Microsoft Cloud App Security/MCAS). As customers face attacks across endpoints, cloud, applications and identities, MTP looks across these domains to understand the entire chain of events, identifies affected assets, like users, endpoints, mailboxes, and applications, and auto-heals them back to a safe state.

Microsoft Threat Protection delivers coverage across the entire kill chain, not just the endpoint

To fully execute the end to end attack simulation of APT29, MITRE required participants to turn off all proactive protection and blocking capabilities. For Microsoft Threat Protection, this meant that all the capabilities that would normally block this kind of attack such as automatic remediation flows, application isolation, attack surface reduction, network protection, exploit protection, controlled folder access, and next-gen antivirus prevention were turned off. However, Microsoft Threat Protection audit capabilities for these features enabled recording of a variety of points during the attack when MTP (had it been fully enabled) would have prevented or blocked execution, likely stopping the attack in its tracks.

During this evaluation Microsoft Threat Protection delivered on providing the deep and broad optics, near real time detection through automation, and a complete, end-to-end view of the attack story. Here is how Microsoft Threat Protection stood out:

  • Depth and breadth of optics: Our uniquely integrated operating system, directory, and cloud sensors contributed deep and broad telemetry coverage. AI-driven, cloud-powered models collaborating across domains identified malicious activities and raised alerts on attacker techniques across the entire attack kill chain:
    • Microsoft Defender ATP recorded and alerted on endpoint activities including advanced file-less techniques, privilege escalation, and credential theft and persistence – leveraging deep sensors like AMSI, WMI, and LDAP.
    • Azure ATP watched and detected account compromise at the domain level, and lateral movement, such as pass-the-hash and the more sophisticated pass-the-ticket (Golden Ticket attack).
    • Microsoft Cloud App Security identified exfiltration of data to the cloud (OneDrive).
  • Detection and containment in near real time:Nation state attacks of this magnitude can take place over the course of as little as a few hours, which means that Security Operations Centers (SOCs) often have little to no time to respond. Near-real-time automated detection of advanced techniques is critical to address this challenge. Where possible, active blocking, prevention and automatic containment will make the difference between an attempted versus a successful compromise. MTP’s prevention capabilities along with fast detection and behavioral blocking are exactly designed for this purpose.
  • A complete attack story: Throughout this evaluation, Microsoft Defender ATP, Azure ATP, and Microsoft Cloud App Security, combined with the expertise of Microsoft Threat Experts generated nearly 80 alerts – for SOC teams, manually following up on each one of these alerts is overwhelming. MTP consolidated the alerts into just two incidents, dramatically simplifying the volume of triage and investigation work needed. This gives the SOC the ability to prioritize and address the incident as a whole and enables streamlined triage, investigation, and automated response process against the complete attack. With MTP we have built in automation that identifies the complex links between attacker activities and builds correlations across domains that piece together the attack story with all of its related alerts, telemetry, evidence and affected assets into coherent incidents. These comprehensive incidents are then prioritized and escalated to the SOC.

 

Microsoft Threat Experts, our managed threat hunting service, also participated in the evaluation this year. Our security experts watched over the signals collected in real time and generated comprehensive, complementary alerts, which enriched the automated detections with additional details, insights and recommendations for the SOC.

Real world testing is critical

Attackers are using advanced, persistent, and intelligent techniques to penetrate today’s defenses. This method of testing leans heavily into real-world exploitations rather than those found solely in a lab or simulated testing environment. Having been part of the inaugural round of the MITRE ATT&CK evaluation in 2018, Microsoft enthusiastically took on the challenge again, as we believe this to be a great opportunity, alongside listening to customers and investing in research, to continuously drive our security products to excellence and protect our customers.

This year, for the first time, we were happy to answer the community call from MITRE, alongside other security vendors, to contribute unique threat intelligence and research content about APT29, as well as in evolving the evaluation based on the experience and feedback from last year, yielding a very collaborative and productive process.

Thank you to MITRE and our customers and partners for your partnership in helping us deliver more visibility and automated protection, detection, response, and prevention of threats for our customers.

– Moti Gindi, CVP, Microsoft Threat Protection

The post MITRE ATT&CK APT 29 evaluation proves Microsoft Threat Protection provides deeper end to end view of advanced threats appeared first on Microsoft Security.

NERC CIP Compliance in Azure vs. Azure Government cloud

April 20th, 2020 No comments

As discussed in my last blog post on North American Electric Reliability Corporation—Critical Infrastructure Protection (NERC CIP) Compliance in Azure, U.S. and Canadian utilities are now free to benefit from cloud computing in Azure for many NERC CIP workloads. Machine learning, multiple data replicas across fault domains, active failover, quick deployment and pay for use benefits are now available for these NERC CIP workloads.

Good candidates include a range of predictive maintenance, asset management, planning, modelling and historian systems as well as evidence collection systems for NERC CIP compliance itself.

It’s often asked whether a utility must use Azure Government Cloud (“Azure Gov”) as opposed to Azure public cloud (“Azure”) to host their NERC CIP compliant workloads. The short answer is that both are an option.  There are several factors that bear on the choice.

U.S. utilities can use Azure and Azure Gov for NERC CIP workloads. Canadian utilities can use Azure.

There are some important differences that should be understood when choosing an Azure cloud for deployment.

Azure and Azure Gov are separate clouds, physically isolated from each other. They both offer U.S. regions. All data replication for both can be kept within the U.S.

Azure also offers two Canadian regions, one in Ontario and one in Quebec, with data stored exclusively in Canada.

Azure Gov is only available to verified U.S. federal, state, and local government entities, some partners and contractors. It has four regions: Virginia, Iowa, Arizona and Texas. Azure Gov is available to U.S.-based NERC Registered Entities.

We are working toward feature parity between Azure and Azure Gov. A comparison is provided here.

The security controls are the same for Azure and Azure Gov clouds. All U.S. Azure regions are now approved for FedRAMP High impact level.

Azure Gov provides additional assurances regarding U.S. government-specific background screening requirements. One of these is verification that Azure Gov operations personnel with potential access to Customer Data are U.S. persons. Azure Gov can also support customers subject to certain export controls laws and regulations. While not a NERC CIP requirement, this can impact U.S. utility customers.

Azure Table 1

Under NERC CIP-004, utilities are required to conduct background checks.

Microsoft U.S. Employee Background Screening

Microsoft US Employee Background Screening

Microsoft’s background checks for both Azure and Azure Gov exceed the requirements of CIP 004.

NERC is not prescriptive on the background check that a utility must conduct as part of its compliance policies.

A utility may have a U.S. citizenship requirement as part of its CIP-004 compliance policy which covers both its own staff and the operators of its cloud infrastructure. Thus, if a utility needs U.S. citizens operating its Microsoft cloud in order to meet its own CIP-004 compliance standards, it can use Azure Gov for this purpose.

A utility may have nuclear assets that subject it to U.S. Department of Energy export control requirements (DOE 10 CFR Part 810) on Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. This rule covers more than the export of nuclear technology outside the United States, it also covers the transmission of protected information or technology to foreign persons inside the U.S. (e.g., employees of the utility and employees of the utility’s cloud provider).

Since access to protected information could be necessary to facilitate a support request, this should be considered if the customer has DOE export control obligations. Though the NERC assets themselves may be non-nuclear, the utility’s policy set may extend to its entire fleet and workforce regardless of generation technology. Azure Gov, which requires that all its operators be U.S. citizens, would facilitate this requirement.

Azure makes the operational advantages, increased security and cost savings of the cloud available for many NERC CIP workloads. Microsoft provides Azure and Azure Gov clouds for our customers’ specific needs.  Microsoft continues its work with regulators to make our cloud available for more workloads, including those requiring compliance with NERC CIP standards. The utility (Registered Entity) is ultimately responsible for NERC CIP compliance and Microsoft continues to work with customers and partners to simplify the efforts to prepare for audits.

Thanks to Larry Cochrane and Stevan Vidich for their leadership on Microsoft’s NERC CIP compliance viewpoint and architecture. Bookmark the Security blog to keep up with our expert coverage on security matters. Also, follow us at @MSFTSecurity for the latest news and updates on cybersecurity. To learn more about our Security solutions visit our website.

 

(c) 2020 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. This document is provided “as-is.” Information and views expressed in this document, including URL and other Internet Web site references, may change without notice. You bear the risk of using it. This document is not intended to communicate legal advice or a legal or regulatory compliance opinion. Each customer’s situation is unique, and legal and regulatory compliance should be assessed in consultation with their legal counsel.

The post NERC CIP Compliance in Azure vs. Azure Government cloud appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Security guidance for remote desktop adoption

April 15th, 2020 No comments

As the volume of remote workers quickly increased over the past two to three months, the IT teams in many companies scrambled to figure out how their infrastructures and technologies would be able to handle the increase in remote connections. Many companies were forced to enhance their capabilities to allow remote workers access to systems and applications from their homes and other locations outside the network perimeter. Companies that couldn’t make changes rapidly enough to increase capacity for remote workers might rely on remote access using the remote desktop protocol, which allows employees to access workstations and systems directly.

Recently, John Matherly (founder of Shodan, the world’s first search engine for internet-connected devices) conducted some research on ports that are accessible on the internet, surfacing some important findings. Notably, there has been an increase in the number of systems accessible via the traditional Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) port and a well-known “alternative” port used for RDP. A surprising finding from John’s research is the ongoing prevalent usage of RDP and its exposure to the internet.

Although Remote Desktop Services (RDS) can be a fast way to enable remote access for employees, there are a number of security challenges that need to be considered before using this as a remote access strategy. One of these challenges is that attackers continue to target the RDP and service, putting corporate networks, systems, and data at risk (e.g., cybercriminals could exploit the protocol to establish a foothold on the network, install ransomware on systems, or take other malicious actions). In addition, there are challenges with being able to configure security for RDP sufficiently, to restrict a cybercriminal from moving laterally and compromising data.

Security considerations for remote desktop include:

  • Direct accessibility of systems on the public internet.
  • Vulnerability and patch management of exposed systems.
  • Internal lateral movement after initial compromise.
  • Multi-factor authentication (MFA).
  • Session security.
  • Controlling, auditing, and logging remote access.

Some of these considerations can be addressed using Microsoft Remote Desktop Services to act as a gateway to grant access to remote desktop systems. The Microsoft Remote Desktop Services gateway uses Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) to encrypt communications and prevents the system hosting the remote desktop protocol services from being directly exposed to the public internet.

Identify RDP use

To identify whether your company is using the Remote Desktop Protocol, you may perform an audit and review of firewall policies and scan internet-exposed address ranges and cloud services you use, to uncover any exposed systems. Firewall rules may be labeled as “Remote Desktop” or “Terminal Services.” The default port for Remote Desktop Services is TCP 3389, but sometimes an alternate port of TCP 3388 might be used if the default configuration has been changed.

Use this guidance to help secure Remote Desktop Services

Remote Desktop Services can be used for session-based virtualization, virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI), or a combination of these two services. Microsoft RDS can be used to help secure on-premises deployments, cloud deployments, and remote services from various Microsoft partners (e.g., Citrix). Leveraging RDS to connect to on-premises systems enhances security by reducing the exposure of systems directly to the internet. Further guidance on establishing Microsoft RDS can be found in our Remote Desktop Services.

On-premises deployments may still have to consider performance and service accessibility depending on internet connectivity provided through the corporate internet connection, as well as the management and maintenance of systems that remain within the physical network.

Leverage Windows Virtual Desktop

Virtual desktop experiences can be enhanced using Windows Virtual Desktop, delivered on Azure. Establishing an environment in Azure simplifies management and offers the ability to scale the virtual desktop and application virtualization services through cloud computing. Leveraging Windows Virtual Desktop foregoes the performance issues associated with on-premises network connections and takes advantage of built-in security and compliance capabilities provided by Azure.

To get more information about setting up, go to our Windows Virtual Desktop product page.

Microsoft documentation on Windows Virtual Desktop offers a tutorial and how-to guide on enabling your Azure tenant for Windows Virtual Desktop and connecting to the virtual desktop environment securely, once it is established.

Secure remote administrator access

Remote Desktop Services are being used not only by employees for remote access, but also by many system developers and administrators to manage cloud and on-premises systems and applications. Allowing administrative access of server and cloud systems directly through RDP elevates the risk because the accounts used for these purposes usually have higher levels of access across systems and environments, including system administrator access. Microsoft Azure helps system administrators to securely access systems using Network Security Groups and Azure Policies. Azure Security Center further enhances secure remote administration of cloud services by allowing “just in time” (JIT) access for administrators.

Attackers target management ports such as SSH and RDP. JIT access helps reduce attack exposure by locking down inbound traffic to Microsoft Azure VMs (Source: Microsoft).

Azure Security Center JIT access enhances security through the following measures:

  • Approval workflow.
  • Automatic removal of access.
  • Restriction on permitted internet IP address.

For more information, visit Azure Security Center JIT.

Evaluate the risk to your organization

Considerations for selection and implementation of a remote access solution should always consider the security posture and risk appetite of your organization. Leveraging remote desktop services offers great flexibility by enabling remote workers to have an experience like that of working in the office, while offering some separation from threats on the endpoints (i.e., user devices, both managed and unmanaged by the organization). At the same time, those benefits should be weighed against the potential threats to the corporate infrastructure (network, systems, and thereby data). Regardless of the remote access implementation your organization uses, it is imperative that you implement best practices around protecting identities and minimizing attack surface to ensure new risks are not introduced.

The post Security guidance for remote desktop adoption appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Enable remote work while keeping cloud deployments secure

April 9th, 2020 No comments

As our customers shift to remote work in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, many have asked how to maintain the security posture of their cloud assets. Azure Security Center security controls can help you monitor your security posture as usage of cloud assets increases. These are three common scenarios:

  1. Enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) to enhance identity protection.
  2. Use just-in-time (JIT) VM access for users that need remote access via RDP or SSH to servers that are in your Azure infrastructure.
  3. Review the “Remediate vulnerabilities control” in Azure Security Center to identify critical security updates needed workloads (servers, containers, databases) that will be accessed remotely.

Read Keeping your cloud deployments secure during challenging times for detailed instructions.

The post Enable remote work while keeping cloud deployments secure appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Categories: Azure Security, Cloud Computing Tags:

Mobile security—the 60 percent problem

April 7th, 2020 No comments

Off the top of your head, what percentage of endpoints in your organization are currently protected?

Something in the 98 percent+ range?

Most enterprises would say having fewer than 2 percent of endpoint devices lacking adequate security would be considered good given the various changes, updates, etc. However, enterprises have traditionally focused security and compliance efforts on traditional computing devices (for example, servers, desktops, and laptops), which represent just 40 percent of the relevant endpoints. The remaining 60 percent of endpoints are mobile devices and are woefully under-protected. That’s a problem.

Mobile security is more important than ever

Mobile devices, both corporate-owned and bring your own device (BYOD), are now the dominant productivity platform in any enterprise organization, with more than 80 percent of daily work performed on a mobile device. These devices operate extensively outside of corporate firewalls, in the hands of users who may not prioritize precautions like vetting Wi-Fi networks or keeping their devices patched and updated. Mobile often represents a wandering corporate data repository.

These factors combine to cause headaches for security teams because, in short, mobile security has a significant gap in most organizations’ endpoint protection strategies.

The lack of protection for (and visibility into) these endpoints introduces significant risk and compliance concerns that show no sign of slowing down. Here are some statistics from Zimperium’s State of Enterprise Mobile Security Report, 2019, which contains data from more than 45 million anonymized endpoints from enterprises in a variety of industries and both local and national government agencies from around the world:

  • Mobile OS vendors created patches for 1,161 security vulnerabilities in 2019.
  • At the end of 2019, 48 percent of iOS devices were more than four versions behind the latest OS version and 58 percent of Android devices were more than two versions behind.
  • Twenty-four percent of enterprise mobile endpoints were exposed to device threats, not including outdated operating systems.
  • Nineteen percent of enterprise mobile endpoints experienced network-based attacks.
  • Sixty-eight percent of malicious profiles were considered “high-risk,” meaning they had elevated access that could lead to data exfiltration or full compromise.

Microsoft and Zimperium deliver comprehensive mobile security

The combination of Microsoft’s management and security solutions and Zimperium’s unique on-device mobile device security delivers unequaled protection for managed and unmanaged BYOD devices. Together, Microsoft and Zimperium have delivered numerous innovations for customers in areas such as:

An endpoint is an endpoint is an endpoint, and they all must be protected

Organizations now realize mobile devices are an unprotected endpoint with possible access to or containing the information of a traditional endpoint. And while there are some overlaps in what you protect—email, calendars, etc.—the way you solve the traditional endpoint security problem is completely different than how you solve the mobile security problem.

So, what does all this really mean for an enterprise?

For a joint Microsoft and Zimperium international banking customer with employees in nine countries using 17,000 corporate and BYOD mobile devices, it means knowing that you are protected with Microsoft Endpoint Manager on Azure. It means knowing how many of your employees are putting your enterprise at risk with outdated iOS versions and high-risk profiles. It means having the ability to remediate and monitor your endpoints with one console. Our customer is in control of its infrastructure choices versus having the vendor forcing a solution. In addition, both iOS and Android platforms are supported and protected. If a user were to switch from one device to another that runs a different OS, the person would simply re-download the Zimperium app and activate.

Once deployed, the solution is capable of simultaneously integrating with unified endpoint solutions (UEM) solutions from multiple vendors. In other words, part of the organization, or specified users, can be managed with one UEM solution, and part of it by another. For joint Zimperium and Microsoft customers, this capability simplifies the migration from a third-party UEM to Microsoft Endpoint Manager while maintaining security during the migration. Zimperium provides visibility and security across the mobile infrastructure for customers who may have multiple UEM solutions deployed.

About Zimperium

Zimperium, the global leader in mobile device and app security, offers real-time, on-device protection against Android and iOS threats. The Zimperium platform leverages our award-winning machine-learning-based engine—z9—to protect mobile data, apps, and sessions against device compromises, network attacks, phishing attempts, and malicious apps.

To date, z9 has detected 100 percent of zero-day device exploits without requiring an update or suffering from the delays and limitations of cloud-based detection—something no other mobile security provider can claim.

Get a free enterprise trial

Interested in trying Zimperium in your Microsoft security environment? Contact us today for mobile device security with protection against network, device, phishing, and malicious app attacks.

The post Mobile security—the 60 percent problem appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Attack matrix for Kubernetes

April 2nd, 2020 No comments

Kubernetes, the most popular container orchestration system and one of the fastest-growing projects in the history of open source, becomes a significant part of many companies’ compute stack. The flexibility and scalability of containers encourage many developers to move their workloads to Kubernetes. While Kubernetes has many advantages, it also brings new security challenges that should be considered. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the various security risks that exist in containerized environments, and specifically in Kubernetes.

The MITRE ATT&CK® framework is a knowledge base of known tactics and techniques that are involved in cyberattacks. Started with coverage for Windows and Linux, the matrices of MITRE ATT&CK cover the various stages that are involved in cyberattacks (tactics) and elaborate the known methods in each one of them (techniques). Those matrices help organizations understand the attack surface in their environments and make sure they have adequate detections and mitigations to the various risks. MITRE ATT&CK framework tactics include:

  • Initial access
  • Execution
  • Persistence
  • Privilege escalation
  • Defense evasion
  • Credential access
  • Discovery
  • Lateral movement
  • Impact

When we in Azure Security Center started to map the security landscape of Kubernetes, we noticed that although the attack techniques are different than those that target Linux or Windows, the tactics are actually similar. For example, a translation of the first four tactics from OS to container clusters would look like 1. “initial access to the computer” becomes “initial access to the cluster”, 2. “malicious code on the computer” becomes “malicious activity on the containers”, 3. “maintain access to the computer” becomes “maintain access to the cluster”, and 4. “gain higher privileges on the computer” becomes “gain higher privileges in the cluster”.

Therefore, we have created the first Kubernetes attack matrix: an ATT&CK-like matrix comprising the major techniques that are relevant to container orchestration security, with focus on Kubernetes.

Image: Initial Access Execution Persistence Privilege Escalation Defense Evasion Credential Access Discovery Lateral Movement Impact Using Cloud credentials Exec into container Backdoor container Privileged container Clear container logs List K8S secrets Access the K8S API server Access cloud resources Data Destruction Compromised images in registry bash/cmd inside container Writable hostPath mount Cluster-admin binding Delete K8S events Mount service principal Access Kubelet API Container service account Resource Hijacking Kubeconfig file New container Kubernetes CronJob hostPath mount Pod / container name similarity Access container service account Network mapping Cluster internal networking Denial of service Application vulnerability Application exploit (RCE) Access cloud resources Connect from Proxy server Applications credentials in configuration files Access Kubernetes dashboard Applications credentials in configuration files Exposed Dashboard SSH server running inside container Instance Metadata API Writable volume mounts on the host Access Kubernetes dashboard Access tiller endpoint

As can be seen, the matrix contains the 9 tactics listed above. Each one of them contains several techniques that can be used by attackers to achieve different goals. Below are the descriptions of each one of the techniques.

  1. Initial Access

The initial access tactic consists of techniques that are used for gaining access to the resource. In containerized environments, those techniques enable first access to the cluster. This access can be achieved directly via the cluster management layer or, alternatively, by gaining access to a malicious or vulnerable resource that is deployed on the cluster.

  • Using cloud credentials

In cases where the Kubernetes cluster is deployed in a public cloud (e.g., AKS in Azure, GKE in GCP, or EKS in AWS), compromised cloud credential can lead to cluster takeover. Attackers who have access to the cloud account credentials can get access to the cluster’s management layer.

  • Compromised images in registry

Running a compromised image in a cluster can compromise the cluster. Attackers who get access to a private registry can plant their own compromised images in the registry. The latter can then be pulled by a user. In addition, users often use untrusted images from public registries (such as Docker Hub) that may be malicious.

Building images based on untrusted base images can also lead to similar results.

  • Kubeconfig file

The kubeconfig file, also used by kubectl, contains details about Kubernetes clusters including their location and credentials. If the cluster is hosted as a cloud service (such as AKS or GKE), this file is downloaded to the client via cloud commands (e.g., “az aks get-credential” for AKS or “gcloud container clusters get-credentials” for GKE).

If attackers get access to this file, for instance via a compromised client, they can use it for accessing the clusters.

  • Vulnerable application

Running a public-facing vulnerable application in a cluster can enable initial access to the cluster. A container that runs an application that is vulnerable to remote code execution vulnerability (RCE) may be exploited. If service account is mounted to the container (default behavior in Kubernetes), the attacker will be able to send requests to the API server using this service account credentials.

  • Exposed dashboard

The Kubernetes dashboard is a web-based user interface that enables monitoring and managing a Kubernetes cluster. By default, the dashboard exposes an internal endpoint (ClusterIP service). If the dashboard is exposed externally, it can allow unauthenticated remote management of the cluster.

  1. Execution

The execution tactic consists of techniques that are used by attackers to run their code inside a cluster.

  • Exec into container

Attackers who have permissions, can run malicious commands in containers in the cluster using exec command (“kubectl exec”). In this method, attackers can use legitimate images, such as an OS image (e.g., Ubuntu) as a backdoor container, and run their malicious code remotely by using “kubectl exec”.

  • New container

Attackers may attempt to run their code in the cluster by deploying a container. Attackers who have permissions to deploy a pod or a controller in the cluster (such as DaemonSet \ ReplicaSet\ Deployment) can create a new resource for running their code.

  • Application exploit

An application that is deployed in the cluster and is vulnerable to a remote code execution vulnerability, or a vulnerability that eventually allows code execution, enables attackers to run code in the cluster. If service account is mounted to the container (default behavior in Kubernetes), the attacker will be able to send requests to the API server using this service account credentials.

  • SSH server running inside container

SSH server that is running inside a container may be used by attackers. If attackers gain valid credentials to a container, whether by brute force attempts or by other methods (such as phishing), they can use it to get remote access to the container by SSH.

  1. Persistence

The persistence tactic consists of techniques that are used by attackers to keep access to the cluster in case their initial foothold is lost.

  • Backdoor container

Attackers run their malicious code in a container in the cluster. By using the Kubernetes controllers such as DaemonSets or Deployments, attackers can ensure that a constant number of containers run in one, or all, the nodes in the cluster.

  • Writable hostPath mount

hostPath volume mounts a directory or a file from the host to the container. Attackers who have permissions to create a new container in the cluster may create one with a writable hostPath volume and gain persistence on the underlying host. For example, the latter can be achieved by creating a cron job on the host.

  • Kubernetes CronJob

Kubernetes Job is a controller that creates one or more pods and ensures that a specified number of them successfully terminate. Kubernetes Job can be used to run containers that perform finite tasks for batch jobs. Kubernetes CronJob is used to schedule Jobs. Attackers may use Kubernetes CronJob for scheduling execution of malicious code that would run as a container in the cluster.

  1. Privilege escalation

The privilege escalation tactic consists of techniques that are used by attackers to get higher privileges in the environment than those they currently have. In containerized environments, this can include getting access to the node from a container, gaining higher privileges in the cluster, and even getting access to the cloud resources.

  • Privileged container

A privileged container is a container that has all the capabilities of the host machine, which lifts all the limitations regular containers have. Practically, this means that privileged containers can do almost every action that can be performed directly on the host. Attackers who gain access to a privileged container, or have permissions to create a new privileged container (by using the compromised pod’s service account, for example), can get access to the host’s resources.

  • Cluster-admin binding

Role-based access control (RBAC) is a key security feature in Kubernetes. RBAC can restrict the allowed actions of the various identities in the cluster. Cluster-admin is a built-in high privileged role in Kubernetes. Attackers who have permissions to create bindings and cluster-bindings in the cluster can create a binding to the cluster-admin ClusterRole or to other high privileges roles.

  • hostPath mount

hostPath mount can be used by attackers to get access to the underlying host and thus break from the container to the host. (See “3: Writable hostPath mount” for details).

  • Access cloud resources

If the Kubernetes cluster is deployed in the cloud, in some cases attackers can leverage their access to a single container in order to get access to other cloud resources outside the cluster. For example, in AKS each node contains service principal credential that is stored in /etc/kubernetes/azure.json. AKS uses this service principal to create and manage Azure resources that are needed for the cluster operation.

By default, the service principal has contributor permissions in the cluster’s Resource Group. Attackers who get access to this service principal file (by hostPath mount, for example) can use its credentials to access or modify the cloud resources.

  1. Defense evasion

The defense evasion tactic consists of techniques that are used by attackers to avoid detection and hide their activity.

  • Clear container logs

Attackers may delete the application or OS logs on a compromised container in an attempt to prevent detection of their activity.

  • Delete Kubernetes events

A Kubernetes event is a Kubernetes object that logs state changes and failures of the resources in the cluster. Example events are a container creation, an image pull, or a pod scheduling on a node.

Kubernetes events can be very useful for identifying changes that occur in the cluster. Therefore, attackers may want to delete these events (e.g., by using: “kubectl delete events–all”) in an attempt to avoid detection of their activity in the cluster.

  • Pod / container name similarity

Pods that are created by controllers such as Deploymen or DaemonSet have random suffix in their names. Attackers can use this fact and name their backdoor pods as they were created by the existing controllers. For example, an attacker could create a malicious pod named coredns-{random suffix} which would look related to the CoreDNS Deployment.

Also, attackers can deploy their containers in the kube-system namespace where the administrative containers reside.

  • Connect from proxy server

Attackers may use proxy servers to hide their origin IP. Specifically, attackers often use anonymous networks such as TOR for their activity. This can be used for communicating with the applications themselves or with the API server.

  1. Credential access

The credential access tactic consists of techniques that are used by attackers to steal credentials.

In containerized environments, this includes credentials of the running application, identities, secrets stored in the cluster, or cloud credentials.

  • List Kubernetes secrets

A Kubernetes secret is an object that lets users store and manage sensitive information, such as passwords and connection strings in the cluster. Secrets can be consumed by reference in the pod configuration. Attackers who have permissions to retrieve the secrets from the API server (by using the pod service account, for example) can access sensitive information that might include credentials to various services.

  • Mount service principal

When the cluster is deployed in the cloud, in some cases attackers can leverage their access to a container in the cluster to gain cloud credentials. For example, in AKS each node contains service principal credential. (See “4: Access cloud resources” for more details.)

  • Access container service account

Service account (SA) represents an application identity in Kubernetes. By default, an SA is mounted to every created pod in the cluster. Using the SA, containers in the pod can send requests to the Kubernetes API server. Attackers who get access to a pod can access the SA token (located in /var/run/secrets/kubernetes.io/serviceaccount/token) and perform actions in the cluster, according to the SA permissions. If RBAC is not enabled, the SA has unlimited permissions in the cluster. If RBAC is enabled, its permissions are determined by the RoleBindings \ ClusterRoleBindings that are associated with it.

  • Application credentials in configuration files

Developers store secrets in the Kubernetes configuration files, such as environment variables in the pod configuration. Such behavior is commonly seen in clusters that are monitored by Azure Security Center. Attackers who have access to those configurations, by querying the API server or by accessing those files on the developer’s endpoint, can steal the stored secrets and use them.

  1. Discovery

The discovery tactic consists of techniques that are used by attackers to explore the environment to which they gained access. This exploration helps the attackers to perform lateral movement and gain access to additional resources.

  • Access the Kubernetes API server

The Kubernetes API server is the gateway to the cluster. Actions in the cluster are performed by sending various requests to the RESTful API. The status of the cluster, which includes all the components that are deployed on it, can be retrieved by the API server. Attackers may send API requests to probe the cluster and get information about containers, secrets, and other resources in the cluster.

  • Access Kubelet API

Kubelet is the Kubernetes agent that is installed on each node. Kubelet is responsible for the proper execution of pods that are assigned to the node. Kubelet exposes a read-only API service that does not require authentication (TCP port 10255). Attackers with network access to the host (for example, via running code on a compromised container) can send API requests to the Kubelet API. Specifically querying https://[NODE IP]:10255/pods/ retrieves the running pods on the node. https://[NODE IP]:10255/spec/ retrieves information about the node itself, such as CPU and memory consumption.

  • Network mapping

Attackers may try to map the cluster network to get information on the running applications, including scanning for known vulnerabilities. By default, there is no restriction on pods communication in Kubernetes. Therefore, attackers who gain access to a single container, may use it to probe the network.

  • Access Kubernetes dashboard

The Kubernetes dashboard is a web-based UI that is used for monitoring and managing the Kubernetes cluster. The dashboard allows users to perform actions in the cluster using its service account (kubernetes-dashboard) with the permissions that are determined by the binding or cluster-binding for this service account. Attackers who gain access to a container in the cluster, can use its network access to the dashboard pod. Consequently, attackers may retrieve information about the various resources in the cluster using the dashboard’s identity.

  • Instance Metadata API

Cloud providers provide instance metadata service for retrieving information about the virtual machine, such as network configuration, disks, and SSH public keys. This service is accessible to the VMs via a non-routable IP address that can be accessed from within the VM only. Attackers who gain access to a container, may query the metadata API service for getting information about the underlying node. For example, in Azure, the following request would retrieve all the metadata information of an instance: http:///metadata/instance?api-version=2019-06-01

  1. Lateral movement

The lateral movement tactic consists of techniques that are used by attackers to move through the victim’s environment. In containerized environments, this includes gaining access to various resources in the cluster from a given access to one container, gaining access to the underlying node from a container, or gaining access to the cloud environment.

  • Access cloud resources

Attackers may move from a compromised container to the cloud environment. (See “4: Access cloud resources” for details).

  • Container service account

Attackers who gain access to a container in the cluster may use the mounted service account token for sending requests to the API server, and gaining access to additional resources in the cluster. (See “6: Access container service account” for more details.)

  • Cluster internal networking

Kubernetes networking behavior allows traffic between pods in the cluster as a default behavior. Attackers who gain access to a single container may use it for network reachability to another container in the cluster.

  • Applications credentials in configuration files

Developers store secrets in the Kubernetes configuration files, for example, as environment variables in the pod configuration. Using those credentials attackers may gain access to additional resources inside and outside the cluster. (See “6: Application credentials in configuration files” for more details.)

  • Writable volume mounts on the host

Attackers may attempt to gain access to the underlying host from a compromised container. (See “3: Writable hostPath mount” for more details.)

  • Access Kubernetes dashboard

Attackers who have access to the Kubernetes dashboard may manage the cluster resources and also run their code on the various containers in the cluster using the built-in “exec” capability of the dashboard. (See “7: Access Kubernetes dashboard” for more details.)

  • Access tiller endpoint

Helm is a popular package manager for Kubernetes maintained by CNCF. Tiller is the server-side component of Helm up to version 2.

Tiller exposes internal gRPC endpoint in the cluster, listens to port 44134. By default, this endpoint does not require authentication. Attackers may run code on any container that is accessible to the tiller’s service and perform actions in the cluster, using the tiller’s service account, which often has high privileges.

  1. Impact

The Impact tactic consists of techniques that are used by attackers to destroy, abuse, or disrupt the normal behavior of the environment.

  • Data destruction

Attackers may attempt to destroy data and resources in the cluster. This includes deleting deployments, configurations, storage, and compute resources.

  • Resource hijacking

Attackers may abuse a compromised resource for running tasks. A common abuse is to use compromised resources for running digital currency mining. Attackers who have access to a container in the cluster or have permissions to create new containers may use them for such activity.

  • Denial of service

Attackers may attempt to perform a denial of service attack, which makes the service unavailable to the legitimate users. In container clusters, this include attempts to block the availability of the containers themselves, the underlying nodes, or the API server.

Understanding the attack surface of containerized environments is the first step of building security solutions for these environments. The matrix that was presented above can help organizations identify the current gaps in their defenses’ coverage against the different threats that target Kubernetes. Azure Security Center can help you protect your containers environment. Learn more about Azure Security Center’s support for container security.

The post Attack matrix for Kubernetes appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Categories: Azure Security, cybersecurity Tags:

Making it easier for your remote workforce to securely access all the apps they need, from anywhere

March 31st, 2020 No comments

Since I published my last blog, Five identity priorities for 2020, COVID-19 has upended the way we work and socialize. Now that physical distancing has become essential to protect everyone’s health, more people than ever are going online to connect and get things done. As we all adjust to a new daily routine, the organizations we work for are turning to technology to help us collaborate and stay productive. In these challenging times, identity can make life simpler, both for people working from home and for IT administrators charged with keeping their environments secure.

In my previous blog, I advised connecting all applications and cloud resources to Azure Active Directory (Azure AD). If you’re like most organizations, your employees use a lot of apps, from popular software-as-a-service (SaaS) apps—including collaboration services like Zoom, Cisco Webex, Workplace from Facebook, or Box—to legacy web and on-premises applications. Making Azure AD the control plane across all your apps helps ensure your employees working from home have secure, seamless access to the tools and resources they need, while protecting those tools and resources from unauthorized access.

Making it easy for remote workers to access the apps they need

When you connect your apps to Azure AD, your employees only need to sign in once to access them, and they only need one set of credentials. To make on-premises web apps available without a cumbersome VPN, you can use Azure AD Application Proxy, while tools from our secure hybrid access partners like can provide access to. To get productive from wherever they are, your employees simply go to the My App Portal, where they can find all the apps they have your permission to use.

Screenshot showing apps in the My Apps portal.

Figure 1: Users can sign in once and access all the apps they need in a central place, the My Apps portal.

Enabling consistent, strong security across all your apps

With Azure AD, enabling productivity doesn’t shortchange security. Once you’ve connected your apps to Azure AD, you can apply custom security policies across your entire digital estate. Since even complex passwords get stolen, we recommend enforcing multi-factor authentication (MFA) for all accounts and applying Conditional Access policies for adaptive granular access controls. For example, when a user signs in, policies can determine whether to allow, limit, or block access based on their location, whether their device is compliant, and which app they’re trying to access.

Additionally, Microsoft Intune App Protection Policies can provide application-level controls and compliance, while maintaining a great user experience on any device. Intune app configuration policies can help keep work data safe by controlling or stopping people from sharing work data outside of trusted apps assigned to them.

Increasing IT efficiency with self-service and automation​

To reduce the burden on IT, Azure AD offers several tools to simplify management. Self-Service Password Reset lets users manage passwords on their own. Pre-integrated applications make it easy to enable single sign-on (SSO) with just a few clicks (Figure 2). Some companies, to help serve their communities. Automated provisioning of user accounts and apps makes onboarding significantly faster, so those new workers can get productive right away. For one customer, Mattress Firm, adding a new employee to their HR system automatically provisions their Azure AD user account and assigns them access to the appropriate applications within four hours.

Screenshot showing apps in the Azure AD Gallery.

Figure 2: Configure your apps for secure, seamless access with just a couple clicks.

Get free assistance connecting your apps to Azure AD

Many of our customers are moving rapidly to enable secure remote work during this current crisis, and we want to make sure you have everything you need. If you have subscriptions to Office 365 or Azure, you can use Azure AD to configure secure SSO for your 10 most critical apps for free. A license for Microsoft 365 gives you full access to Azure AD. For all our customers, we also offer complimentary deployment assistance through our FastTrack program.

As unprecedented numbers of people work remotely, the right tools, including Azure AD, can help keep them both protected and productive. Whatever your circumstances, we’re here to help. You can reach us via Twitter: @AzureAD.

Learn more

Learn how to use Azure AD to connect your workforce to all the apps they need from anywhere.

 

*This offer includes MFA via the Microsoft Authenticator app only.

The post Making it easier for your remote workforce to securely access all the apps they need, from anywhere appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Alternative ways for security professionals and IT to achieve modern security controls in today’s unique remote work scenarios

March 26th, 2020 No comments

With the bulk of end users now working remotely, legacy network architectures that route all remote traffic through a central corporate network are suddenly under enormous strain. The result can be poorer performance, productivity, and user experience. Many organizations are now rethinking their network infrastructure design to address these issues, especially for applications like Microsoft Teams and Office 365. At Microsoft, for example, we adopted split tunneling as part of our VPN strategy. Our customers have asked us for guidance on how to manage security in this changing environment.

An architecture that routes all remote traffic back to the corporate network was originally intended to provide the security team with the following:

  • Prevention of unauthorized access
  • Control of authorized user access
  • Network protections such as Intrusion Detection/Prevention (IDS/IPS) and Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) mitigation
  • Data loss prevention (DLP)

In this post, we’ll address alternative ways of achieving modern security controls, so security teams can manage risk in a more direct-to-internet network architecture.

Prevention of unauthorized access

Multi-factor authentication (MFA) helps increase authentication assurance. We recommend requiring it for all users. If you are not ready to deploy to all users, consider entering an emergency pilot for higher risk or more targeted users. Learn more about how to use Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) Conditional Access to enforce MFA. You will also want to block legacy authentication protocols that allow users to bypass MFA requirements.

Control of authorized user access

Ensure only registered devices that comply with your organization’s security policies can access your environment, to reduce the risk that would be posed by resident malware or intruders. Learn more about how to use Azure AD Conditional Access to enforce device health requirements. To further increase your level of assurance, you can evaluate user and sign-on risk to block or restrict risky user access. You may also want to prevent your users from accessing other organizations’ instances of the Office 365 applications. If you do this with Azure AD tenant restrictions, only logon traffic needs to traverse the VPN.

Network protections

Some of the protections that you may have traditionally provided by routing traffic back through your corporate network can now be provided by the cloud apps your users are accessing. Office 365, for example, is globally distributed and designed to allow the customer network to route user requests to the closest Office 365 service entry point. Learn more about Office 365 network connectivity principles. We build resiliency into Office 365 to minimize potential disruption. We protect Office 365 and Azure from network attacks like DDoS on behalf of our customers.

With the above controls in place, you may be ready to route remote users’ traffic directly to Office 365. If you still require a VPN link for access to other applications, you can greatly improve your performance and user experience by implementing split tunneling.

We strongly recommend that you review VPN and VPS infrastructure for updates, as attackers are actively tailoring exploits to take advantage of remote workers. Microsoft Threat Intelligence teams have observed multiple nation state and cybercrime actors targeting unpatched VPN systems for many months. In October 2019, both the National Security Agency and National Cyber Security Centre issued alerts on these attacks. The Department of Homeland Security Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and Department of Commerce National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have published useful guidance on securing VPN/VPS infrastructure.

DLP

To help you prevent the accidental disclosure of sensitive information, Office 365 has a rich set of built-in tools. You can use the built-in DLP capabilities of Teams and SharePoint to detect inappropriately stored or shared sensitive information. If part of your remote work strategy involves a bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policy, you can use Conditional Access App Control to prevent sensitive data from being downloaded to users’ personal devices.

Malware detection

By default, SharePoint Online automatically scans file uploads for known malware. Enable Exchange Online Protection to scan email messages for malware. If your Office 365 subscription includes Office 365 Advanced Threat Protection (ATP), enable it to provide advanced protection against malware. If your organization uses Microsoft Defender ATP for endpoint protection, remember that each user is licensed for up to five company-managed devices.

Additional resources

The post Alternative ways for security professionals and IT to achieve modern security controls in today’s unique remote work scenarios appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Work remotely, stay secure—guidance for CISOs

March 12th, 2020 No comments

With many employees suddenly working from home, there are things an organization and employees can do to help remain productive without increasing cybersecurity risk.

While employees in this new remote work situation will be thinking about how to stay in touch with colleagues and coworkers using chat applications, shared documents, and replacing planned meetings with conference calls, they may not be thinking about cyberattacks. CISOs and admins need to look urgently at new scenarios and new threat vectors as their organizations become a distributed organization overnight, with less time to make detailed plans or run pilots.

Based on our experiences working with customers who have had to pivot to new working environments quickly, I want to share some of those best practices that help ensure the best protection.

What to do in the short—and longer—term

Enabling official chat tools helps employees know where to congregate for work. If you’re taking advantage of the six months of free premium Microsoft Teams or the removed limits on how many users can join a team or schedule video calls using the “freemium” version, follow these steps for supporting remote work with Teams. The Open for Business Hub lists tools from various vendors that are free to small businesses during the outbreak. Whichever software you pick, provision it to users with Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) and set up single-sign-on, and you won’t have to worry about download links getting emailed around, which could lead to users falling for phishing emails.

You can secure access to cloud applications with Azure AD Conditional Access, protecting those sign-ins with security defaults. Remember to look at any policies you have set already, to make sure they don’t block access for users working from home. For secure collaboration with partners and suppliers, look at Azure AD B2B.

Azure AD Application Proxy publishes on-premises apps for remote availability, and if you use a managed gateway, today we support several partner solutions with secure hybrid access for Azure AD.

While many employees have work laptops they use at home, it’s likely organizations will see an increase in the use of personal devices accessing company data. Using Azure AD Conditional Access and Microsoft Intune app protection policies together helps manage and secure corporate data in approved apps on these personal devices, so employees can remain productive.

Intune automatically discovers new devices as users connect with them, prompting them to register the device and sign in with their company credentials. You could manage more device options, like turning on BitLocker or enforcing password length, without interfering with users’ personal data, like family photos; but be sensitive about these changes and make sure there’s a real risk you’re addressing rather than setting policies just because they’re available.

Read more in Tech Community on ways Azure AD can enable remote work.

You’ve heard me say it time and again when it comes to multi-factor authentication (MFA): 100 percent of your employees, 100 percent of the time. The single best thing you can do to improve security for employees working from home is to turn on MFA. If you don’t already have processes in place, treat this as an emergency pilot and make sure you have support folks ready to help employees who get stuck. As you probably can’t distribute hardware security devices, use Windows Hello biometrics and smartphone authentication apps like Microsoft Authenticator.

Longer term, I recommend security admins consider a program to find and label the most critical data, like Azure Information Protection, so you can track and audit usage when employees work from home. We must not assume that all networks are secure, or that all employees are in fact working from home when working remotely.

Track your Microsoft Secure Score to see how remote working affects your compliance and risk surface. Use Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) to look for attackers masquerading as employees working from home, but be aware that access policies looking for changes in user routines may flag legitimate logons from home and coffee shops.

How to help employees

As more organizations adapt to remote work options, supporting employees will require more than just providing tools and enforcing policies. It will be a combination of tools, transparency, and timeliness.

Remote workers have access to data, information, and your network. This increases the temptation for bad actors. Warn your employees to expect more phishing attempts, including targeted spear phishing aimed at high profile credentials. Now is a good time to be diligent, so watch out for urgent requests that break company policy, use emotive language and have details that are slightly wrong—and provide guidance on where to report those suspicious messages.

Establishing a clear communications policy helps employees recognize official messages. For example, video is harder to spoof than email: an official channel like Microsoft Stream could reduce the chance of phishing while making people feel connected. Streaming videos they can view at a convenient time will also help employees juggling personal responsibilities, like school closures or travel schedule changes.

Transparency is key. Some of our most successful customers are also some of our most transparent ones. Employee trust is built on transparency. By providing clear and basic information, including how to protect their devices, will help you and employees stay ahead of threats.

For example, help employees understand why downloading and using consumer or free VPNs is a bad idea. These connections can extract sensitive information from your network without employees realizing. Instead, offer guidance on how to leverage your VPN and how it’s routed through a secure VPN connection.

Employees need a basic understanding of conditional access policies and what their devices need to connect to the corporate network, like up-to-date anti-malware protection. This way employees understand if their access is blocked and how to get the support they need.

Working from home doesn’t mean being isolated. Reassure employees they can be social, stay in touch with colleagues, and still help keep the business secure. Read more about staying productive while working remotely on the Microsoft 365 blog.

The post Work remotely, stay secure—guidance for CISOs appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Empower Firstline Workers with Azure AD and YubiKey passwordless authentication

March 12th, 2020 No comments

At the end of February, Microsoft announced the FIDO2 passwordless support for hybrid environments. The integration of FIDO2-based YubiKeys and Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) is a game changer. It combines the ubiquity of Azure AD, the usability of YubiKey, and the security of both solutions to put us on the path to eliminate passwords in the enterprise. Think about that for a moment. Imagine never being asked to change your password again, no more password spreadsheets or vault apps. No more phishing and password spray! Would it be too much to compare it to the moon landing? Probably. But it’s at least as monumental to security as the introduction of passwords themselves. Now think about how much passwordless authentication will improve everyday work for Firstline Workers. Today I’ll share why usability and user experience are so important and how you can modernize work (and security) while reducing costs for Firstline Workers. I’ll also provide advice on transitioning your hybrid environment to passwordless.

User experience matters

Do you want to know why attackers have been so successful? Because they’ve paid attention to user experience. The tools they use to trick users to hand over passwords have been carefully updated to feel legitimate to users. One tool even has a Help Desk, if you can believe that! And it’s working. Many users don’t even realize they’ve given up their password. Bad actors can focus on usability because the economics of hacking are cheap. They don’t have to be present to interrupt a sign-in, and they only need one password to gain access and move laterally to increase privileges. They don’t need a high success rate to achieve a good payoff, which allows them to take the time to get it right. They use that time to research companies for good targets and improving the user experience of their phishing attempts.

Yubico understands the importance of usability and makes security tools accessible and easy to use. Our flagship product, YubiKey, was designed with these principles in mind. The YubiKey is a hardware token with a cryptographic element that supports FIDO2 standards. It is not a password storage device, nor does it contain any personal information. With traditional passwords, the server requests a password, and if the user hands over the password, the server has no way to validate if that user should have that password. With a YubiKey, the server sends a challenge to the user. The user plugs the key in and touches it to sign the challenge. It requires the user to be physically present, so it eliminates remote takeovers of accounts. The ability to work from anywhere in the world is what enables cybercrime.

 

Equally important is its simplicity. Users don’t need to find a code on a separate device or remember complicated passwords or a PIN. The same key can be used across all their devices and accounts, and you can attach it to a keychain. (Take a look at this video to see it in action.)

Transform the Firstline Worker experience, securely

The biggest opportunity for the Azure AD and YubiKey integration to make a real difference is with Firstline Workers. Firstline Workers are more than 2 billion people worldwide who work in service- or task-oriented roles across industries such as retail, hospitality, travel, and manufacturing. They are often mobile, and many serve as the first touchpoint with your customers. Incredibly important to your business, they have been underserved by the cloud revolution. Firstline Workers typically aren’t issued a computer, and the computers they do use may not have a lot of connectivity. This makes it difficult to stay connected to corporate communications or interact digitally with coworkers. It can also prevent them from efficiently doing their jobs. For example, it can be challenging to serve customers if an employee needs to sign into an available computer to answer a question.

One call center reduced the steps to sign in from 13 steps to six—that’s a 60 percent reduction.

There are a lot of hidden costs to password resets. To reduce this time, Firstline Worker passwords often never change. They have developed the same familiar bad habits as office workers: they write down passwords or reuse the same one across multiple sites. Lurking in the wings are the bad actors who just need one password to infiltrate your organization.

YubiKey reduces that risk and empowers your Firstline Workers. With a YubiKey users can easily move from device to device. This can dramatically improve the work experience. It also drives better business outcomes. One call center that implemented YubiKey authentication cut its sign-in process from 13 steps to six—that’s a 60 percent reduction. Reducing time spent signing in can drive huge costs reductions.

The Azure AD and YubiKey integration can support your digital transformation goals in the field. Firstline Workers will easily access the information they need whether that is for customer service or building new products—with significantly less risk of an account takeover.

Transition your hybrid environment to passwordless

YubiKey is a good fit for companies who are invested in Microsoft technology because the device includes several generations of solutions. It works with legacy applications (we can protect anything from Windows XP on up) and cloud solutions like Azure and Office 365. It can support one-time passwords (OTP) with Active Directory or smart card capabilities. If you use Active Directory Federation Services to authenticate, there is a plugin that integrates with on-premises. It’s also compatible with cloud-based authentication, and we are working with Microsoft on integration with Azure Active Directory. Our latest YubiKey 5 Series supports the following authentication technologies:

  • FIDO2
  • U2F
  • PIV
  • Yubico OTP
  • OATH HOTP

As a first step towards passwordless, no matter your environment, start by implementing multi-factor authentication (MFA) everywhere, using the YubiKey as a hardware-based backup to a username and password.

Learn more

Yubico is committed to developing new technology to help users trust what they are doing online. We are working with Microsoft to build the latest and greatest into Azure AD. Join us at one of our co-hosted workshops with Microsoft where we will walk you through how you can plan your journey towards eliminating passwords.

Read Alex Simons’ blog announcement about Azure Active Directory support for FIDO2 security keys.   For more information on Microsoft Security solutions, visit https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/security/business.

The post Empower Firstline Workers with Azure AD and YubiKey passwordless authentication appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Microsoft identity acronyms—what do they mean and how do they relate to each other?

March 2nd, 2020 No comments

As a security advisor working with one to three Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs) each week, the topic of identity comes up often. These are smart people who have often been in industry for decades. They have their own vocabulary of acronyms that only security professionals know such as DDoS, CEH, CERT, RAT, and 0-Day (if you don’t know one or several of these terms, I encourage you to look them up to build your vocabulary), but they often find themselves confused by Microsoft’s own set of acronyms.

This is the first in a blog series that aims to lessen some confusion around identity by sharing with you some of the terms used at Microsoft. Terms like MFA, PIM, PAM, MIM, MAM, MDM, and a few others. What do they mean and how do they relate to each other?

Multi-Factor Authentication or MFA

Let’s start with what identity means to Microsoft. Identity is the ability to clearly and without doubt ensure the identification of a person, device, location, or application. This is done by establishing trust verification and identity verification using what Microsoft calls Multi-Factor Authentication or MFA. This is a combination of capabilities that allow the entity to establish trust and verify who or what they are.

MFA is an authentication method in which a computer user is granted access only after successfully presenting two or more pieces of evidence (or factors) to an authentication mechanism: something the user and only the user knows (such as a password or PIN), something the user and only the user has (such as a mobile device or FIDO key), and something the user and only the user is (a biometric such as a fingerprint or iris scan).

Microsoft does this with technologies such as Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) in the cloud combined with Windows Hello. Azure AD is Microsoft’s identity and access management solution. Windows Hello is a Windows capability that allows a user to verify who they are with an image, a pin, or other biometric. The person’s identity is stored via an encrypted hash in the cloud, so it’s never shared in the clear (unencrypted). A cryptographic hash is a checksum that allows someone to proof that they know the original input (e.g., a password) and that the input (e.g., a document) has not been modified.

Privileged Identity Management or PIM

What is Privileged Identity Management or PIM? Organizations use PIM to assign, activate, and approve privileged identities in Azure AD. PIM provides time-based and approval-based role activation to mitigate the risks of excessive, unnecessary, or misused access permissions to sensitive resources.

Key features of PIM include:

  • Just-in-time privileged access to Azure AD and Azure resources.
  • Time-bound access to resources.
  • An approval process to activate privileged roles.
  • MFA enforcement.
  • Justification to understand why users activate.
  • Notifications when roles are activated.
  • Access reviews and internal and external audit history.

Privileged Access Management or PAM

What is Privileged Access Management or PAM? Often confused with PIM, PAM is a capability to help organizations manage identities for existing on-premises Active Directory environments. PAM is an instance of PIM that is accessed using Microsoft Identity Manager or MIM. Confused? Let me explain.

PAM helps organizations solve a few problems including:

  • Making it harder for attackers to penetrate a network and obtain privileged account access.
  • Adding protection to privileged groups that control access to domain-joined computers and the applications on those computers.
  • Providing monitoring, visibility, and fine-grained controls so organizations can see who their privileged admins are and what they are doing.

PAM gives organizations more insight into how admin accounts are being used in the environment.

Microsoft Identity Manager or MIM

But I also mentioned MIM… What is this? Microsoft Identity Manager or MIM helps organizations manage the users, credentials, policies, and access within their organizations and hybrid environments. With MIM, organizations can simplify identity lifecycle management with automated workflows, business rules, and easy integration with heterogenous platforms across the datacenter. MIM enables Active Directory to have the right users and access rights for on-premises apps. Azure AD Connect can then make those users and permissions available in Azure AD for Office 365 and cloud-hosted apps.

OK, so now we know that:

  • PIM is a capability to help companies manage identities in Azure AD.
  • PAM is an on-premises capability to manage identities in Active Directory.
  • MIM helps organizations manage users, credentials, policies, and on-premises access.

Mobile Application Management or MAM

What’s left… Oh yes: Mobile Application Management or MAM. MAM is important because if organizations can only manage identities—but not the apps then they miss a key aspect of protecting data. MAM is connected to a Microsoft capability called Microsoft Intune and is a suite of management features to publish, push, configure, secure, monitor, and update mobile apps for users.

MAM works with or without enrollment of the device, which means organizations can protect sensitive data on almost any device using MAM-WE (without enrollment). If organizations enable MFA, they can verify the user on the device. MAM also helps manage that apps the trusted user or entity can access. If you add in the Mobile Device Management or MDM feature of Intune, you can force enrollment of devices and then use MAM to manage the apps.

It’s well known that Microsoft has a lot of acronyms. This is the first in a series of blog posts aimed to assist you in navigating the acronym forest created by companies and industry. The Microsoft Platform includes a powerful set of capabilities to help encourage users to make the right decisions and gives security leadership, like you, the ability to manage and monitor identities and control access to critical files and network assets.

The post Microsoft identity acronyms—what do they mean and how do they relate to each other? appeared first on Microsoft Security.

MISA expands with new members and new product additions

February 24th, 2020 No comments

Another RSA Conference (RSAC) and another big year for the Microsoft Intelligent Security Association (MISA). MISA was launched at RSAC 2018 with 26 members and a year later we had doubled in size to 53 members. Today, I am excited to share that the association has again doubled in size to 102 members.

New members expand the portfolio of MISA integrations

Our new members include a number of ecosystem partners, like RSA, ServiceNow, and Net Motion, which have developed critical integrations that benefit our shared customers and we look forward to deepening our relationship through MISA engagement.

New MISA member RSA is now using Azure Active Directory’s risky user data and other Microsoft security signals to enrich their risk score engine. Additionally, RSA also leverages the Graph Security API to feed their SIEM solution, RSA NetWitness with alerts from the entire suite of Microsoft Security solutions.

 “RSA is excited to showcase the RSA SecurID and RSA NetWitness integrations with Microsoft Security products. Our integrations with Microsoft Defender ATP, Microsoft Graph Security API, Azure AD, and Microsoft Azure Sentinel, help us to better secure access to our mutual customer’s applications, and detect threats and attacks. We’re excited to formalize the long-standing relationship through RSA Ready and MISA to better defend our customers against a world of increasing threats.”
—Anna Sarnek, Head of Strategic Business Development, Cloud and Identity for RSA

The ServiceNow Security Operations integration with Microsoft Graph Security API enables shared customers to automate incident management and response, leveraging the capabilities of the Now Platform’s single data model to dramatically improve their ability to prioritize and respond to threats generated by all Microsoft Security Solutions and custom alerts from Azure Sentinel.

“ServiceNow is pleased to join the Microsoft Intelligent Security Alliance to accelerate security incident response for our shared customers. The ServiceNow Security Operations integration with Azure Sentinel, via the graph security API, enables shared customers to automate incident management and response, leveraging the capabilities of the Now Platform’s single data model to dramatically improve their ability to prioritize and respond to threats.”
—Lou Fiorello, Head of Security Products for ServiceNow

Microsoft is pleased to welcome NetMotion, a connectivity and security solutions company for the world’s growing mobile workforce, into the security partner program. Using NetMotion’s class-leading VPN, customers not only gain uncompromised connectivity and feature parity, they benefit from a VPN that is compatible with Windows, MacOS, Android and iOS devices. For IT teams, NetMotion delivers visibility and control over the entire connection from endpoint to endpoint, over any network, through integration with Microsoft Endpoint Manager (Microsoft Intune).

“NetMotion is designed from the ground up to protect and enhance the user experience of any mobile device. By delivering plug-and-play integration with Microsoft Endpoint Manager, the mobile workforce can maximize productivity and impact without any disruption to their workflow from day one. For organizations already using or considering Microsoft, the addition of NetMotion’s VPN is an absolute no-brainer.”
—Christopher Kenessey, CEO of NetMotion Software

Expanded partner strategy for Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP)

The Microsoft Defender ATP team worked with our ecosystem partners to take their rich and complete set of APIs a step further to extend the power of our combined platforms. This helps customers strengthen their network and endpoint security posture, add continuous security validation and attack simulation testing, orchestrate and automate incident correlation and remediation, and add threat intelligence and web content filtering capabilities. Read Extending Microsoft Defender ATP network of partners to learn more about their partner strategy expansion and their open framework philosophy.

New product teams join the association

In addition to growing our membership, MISA expanded to cover 12 of Microsoft’s security solutions, including our latest additions: Azure Security Center for IoT Security and Azure DDoS.

Azure Security Center for IoT Security announces five flagship integration partners

The simple onboarding flow for Azure Security Center for IoT enables you to protect your managed and unmanaged IoT devices, view all security alerts, reduce your attack surface with security posture recommendations, and run unified reports in a single pane of glass.

Through partnering with members like Attivo Networks, CyberMDX, CyberX, Firedome, and SecuriThings, Microsoft is able to leverage their vast knowledge pool to help customers defend against a world of increasing IoT threats in enterprise. These solutions protect managed and unmanaged IoT devices in manufacturing, energy, building management systems, healthcare, transportation, smart cities, smart homes, and more. Read more about IoT security and how these five integration partners are changing IoT security in this blog.

Azure DDoS Protection available to partners to combat DDoS attacks

The first DDoS attack occurred way back on July 22, 1999, when a network of 114 computers infected with a malicious script called Trin00 attacked a computer at the University of Minnesota, according to MIT Technology Review. Even after 20 years DDoS continues to be an ever-growing problem, with the number of DDoS attacks doubling in the last year alone and the types of attacks getting increasingly sophisticated with the explosion of IoT devices.

Azure DDoS Protection provides countermeasures against the most sophisticated DDoS threats. The service provides enhanced DDoS mitigation capabilities for your application and resources deployed in your virtual networks. Technology partners can now protect their customers’ resources natively with Azure DDoS Protection Standard to address the availability and reliability concerns due to DDoS attacks.

“Extending Azure DDoS Protection capabilities to Microsoft Intelligent Security Association will help our shared customers to succeed by leveraging the global scale of Azure Networking to protect their workloads against DDoS attacks”
—Anupam Vij, Principal Product Manager, Azure Networking

Learn more

To see MISA members in action, visit the Microsoft booth at RSA where we have a number of our security partners presenting and demoing throughout the week. To learn more about the Microsoft Intelligent Security Association, visit our webpage or the video playlist of member integrations. For more information on Microsoft security solutions, visit our website.

The post MISA expands with new members and new product additions appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Azure Sphere—Microsoft’s answer to escalating IoT threats—reaches general availability

February 24th, 2020 No comments

Today Azure Sphere—Microsoft’s integrated security solution for IoT devices and equipment—is widely available for the development and deployment of secure, connected devices. Azure Sphere’s general availability milestone couldn’t be timelier. From consumer device hacking and botnets to nation state driven cyberterrorism, the complexity of the landscape is accelerating. And as we expand our reliance on IoT devices at home, in our businesses and even in the infrastructure that supports transit and utilities, cybersecurity threats are increasingly real to individuals, businesses and society at large.

From its inception in Microsoft Research to general availability today, Azure Sphere is Microsoft’s answer to these escalating IoT threats. Azure Sphere delivers quick and cost-effective device security for OEMs and organizations to protect the products they sell and the critical equipment that they rely on to drive new business value.

To mark today’s general availability milestone, I sat down with Galen Hunt, distinguished engineer and product leader of Azure Sphere to discuss the world of cybersecurity, the threat landscape that businesses and governments are operating in, and how Microsoft and Azure Sphere are helping organizations confidently and securely take advantage of the opportunities enabled by IoT.

 

ANN JOHNSON: Let me start by asking about a comment I once heard you make, where you refer to the internet as “a cauldron of evil.” Can you give us a little insight into what you mean?

GALEN HUNT: Well, I actually quote James Mickens. James is a former colleague at Microsoft Research, and he’s now a professor at Harvard. Those are his words, the idea of the internet being a cauldron of evil. But I love it, because what it really captures is what the internet really is.

The internet is a place of limitless potential, but when you connect a device to the internet, you’re also creating a two-way street; anybody can come in off the internet and try to attack you.

Everything from nation states to petty criminals to organized crime is out there, operating on the internet. As we think about IoT—which is my favorite topic—being aware of the dangers is the first step to being prepared to address them.

ANN JOHNSON: When you’re thinking about folks that are in charge of security organizations, or even folks who have to secure the environment for themselves, what do you view as the biggest threats, and also the biggest opportunities for companies like Microsoft to address those threats?

GALEN HUNT: I think the biggest threat is—and I’m coming at this from the IoT side of things—as we’re able to connect every single device in an enterprise or every single device in a home to the internet, there’s real risk. By compromising those devices, someone can invade our privacy, they can have access to our data, they can manipulate our environment. Those are real risks.

In the traditional internet, the non-Internet-of-Things internet, the damage that could be done was purely digital. But in a connected IoT environment, remote actors are able to affect or monitor not just the digital environment but also the actual physical environment. So that creates all sorts of risks that need to be addressed.

In response, the power that a company like Microsoft can bring is our deep experience in internet security. We’ve been doing it for years. We can help other organizations leverage that experience. That’s a tremendous opportunity we have to help.

ANN JOHNSON: So, with that, walk us through what Azure Sphere is—how do you see our customers and our partners leveraging the technology?

GALEN HUNT: There are four components to Azure Sphere: three of them are powered by technology and one of them is powered by people. Those components combine to form an end-to-end solution that allows any organization that’s building or connecting devices to have the very best of what we know about making internet-connected devices secure.

Let’s talk about the four components.

The first of the three technical components is the certified chips that are built by our silicon partners, they have the hardware root of trust that Microsoft created. These are chips that provide a foundation of security, starting in the silicon itself, and provide connectivity and compute power for these devices.

The second technical component of Azure Sphere is the Azure Sphere operating system. This runs on the chips and creates a secure software environment.

The third technical component is the cloud-based Azure Sphere security service. The security service connects with every single Azure Sphere chip, with every single Azure Sphere operating system, and works with the operating system and the chip to keep the device secured throughout its lifetime.

ANN JOHNSON: So, you’ve got hardware, software, and the cloud, all working together. What about the human component?

GALEN HUNT: The fourth component of Azure Sphere is our people and all their security expertise. Our team provides ongoing security monitoring of Azure Sphere devices and, actually, of the full ecosystem. As we identify new types of attacks and new emerging security vulnerabilities, we will upgrade our operating system and the cloud services to mitigate against those new kinds of attacks. Then we will deploy updates to every Azure Sphere-based device, globally. So, we’re providing ongoing support, and ongoing security improvements for those devices.

ANN JOHNSON: I want to make this real for folks. Walk me through a use case; where would somebody actually implement and use Azure Sphere? How does their infrastructure or architecture fit in?

GALEN HUNT: Okay, let’s start with a device manufacturer. They say, okay we’re going to create a new device, and we want to have that device be an IoT device. We want it to connect to the internet, so it can be integrated into an organization’s digital feedback loop. And so, they will buy a chip, an Azure Sphere-based microcontroller or SoC, which will serve as the primary processing component, and they build that into their device. The Azure Sphere chip provides the compute power and secured connectivity.

Now, of course not everybody is building a brand-new device from scratch. There are a lot of existing devices out there that are very valuable. Sometimes they’re too valuable to take on the risk of connecting them and exposing them to the internet. One of the things we’ve developed during the Azure Sphere preview period is a new class of device that we call a “guardian module.” The guardian module is a very small device—no larger than the size of a deck of cards—built around an Azure Sphere chip. An organization interested in connecting existing devices can connect through the guardian module and pull data from that existing device and securely connect it to the cloud. The guardian modules, powered by Azure Sphere, are a way to add highly secure connectivity—even to existing devices—that’s protected by Microsoft.

ANN JOHNSON: Interesting, it solves a pretty big problem with device security, especially as we continue to see a massive proliferation of devices in our environment, most of which are unmanaged. What do you think is slowing the broad adoption of security related to connected devices?

GALEN HUNT: Well, there are a couple of things. I think the biggest barrier, up until now, has been the lack of an end-to-end solution. For companies that have had aspirations to build or to buy highly secured devices, each device has been a one-off. Customers have had to completely build a unique solution for each device, and that just takes an incredible amount of expertise and hard work.

The other obstacle I’ve found is that organizations realize that they need secure devices, but they just don’t know where to begin. They don’t know what they should be looking for, from a device security perspective. There’s a bit of a temptation to look for a security feature checklist instead of really understanding what’s required to have a device that’s highly secured.

ANN JOHNSON: I know you’ve given this a lot of consideration and your background gives you a deeper view into what it takes to secure devices. You wrote a paper on the seven properties of highly secure devices, based on a lot of research you’ve done on the topic. How did you coalesce on the seven properties and how customers can implement them securely?

GALEN HUNT: Yes, I’m a computer scientist, and for over 15 years I ran operating systems research in Microsoft Research. About five years ago, someone walked into my office with a schematic, or a floor map, of a brand new—actually, still under development—microcontroller. This was actually the very first of a new class of a microcontroller.

A microcontroller, for anybody who is not familiar, is a single-chip computer that has processer, and storage, memory, and IoT capabilities. Microcontrollers are used in everything from toys, to appliances, even industrial equipment. Well, this was the first time I had seen a microcontroller, a programmable microcontroller, with the physical capabilities required to be able to connect to the internet—built in—and at a price point that was just a couple of dollars.

When I looked at this thing, I realized that for the price of a cup of coffee, anything on the planet that had electricity could be turned into an internet device. I realized I was looking at the fifth generation of computing, and that was a terribly exciting thought. But the person who had come into my office was asking, what kind of code should we run on this so that it would be secure if we did want to build internet-connected devices with it?

And what I realized, really quickly, was that even though it had some great security features, it lacked much of what was required to build a secure device from a software perspective, and that set me off on journey. I imagined this dystopian future where there are nine billion new insecure devices being added to the world’s population, every year.

ANN JOHNSON: Sure, the physical risks of device hacking make nine billion insecure IoT devices a daunting thought.

GALEN HUNT: Well for me, that was a really scary thought. And as a scientist, I said, well we know that Microsoft and our peer companies have built devices that have been out on the internet. They’ve been connected for at least a five-year period and have withstood relentless attacks from hackers and other ne’er-do-wells. The driving question of our next phase of work was: why are some devices highly secure, and what is it that separates them?

And we did a very scientific study of finding these secure devices and trying to figure out the qualities and the properties that they had in common, and this led to our list of these seven properties. We published that paper, which then led to more experiments.

Now, the devices we found that had these seven properties were devices that had hundreds of dollars in electronics in them, and, you know, that’s not going to scale to every device on the planet. You’re not going to be able to add hundreds of dollars of electronics to every device on the planet, like a light bulb, in order to get security.

Then we wondered if we could build a very, very small and a very, very economical solution that contained all seven properties. And that’s what ultimately led us to Azure Sphere. It’s a solution that, really, for just a few dollars, any company can build a device that is highly secured.

ANN JOHNSON: So, the device itself is highly secured; it has all these built-in capabilities, but one of the biggest problems our customers face is fundamentally a talent shortage, right? Is there something that we’re inherently doing here, with Azure Sphere, that could make it easier for customers?

GALEN HUNT: Yes. Fundamentally what we’re trying to do is create a scalable solution, and it is Microsoft talent that helps these companies create these highly secure devices. There’s something like a million-plus openings in the field of security professionals. Globally there’s a huge talent shortage.

With Azure Sphere we allow a company that doesn’t have really deep security expertise to draft off of our security talent. There are a few areas of expertise that one has to have in order to build a highly-secure device with similar capabilities to Azure Sphere.

Sometimes I’ll use the words technology, talent, and tactics. You have to have the technical expertise to actually build a device that has a high degree of security in it. Not just a device with a checklist of features, but with true integration across all components for gap-free security. Then, once the device is built and deployed out into the wild, you need the talent to fight the ongoing security battle. That talent is watching for and detecting emerging security threats and coding up mitigations to address them. And finally, you’ll have to scale out those updates to every device. That’s a really deep set of expertise, talent, and tactics and, for the most part, it’s very much outside of what many companies know how to do.

When building on top of Azure Sphere, instead of staffing or developing all of this expertise outside of their core business, organizations can instead outsource that to Microsoft.

ANN JOHNSON: That’s a really great way to put it. It also gives you that end-to-end security integration, right? Because I would imagine Azure Sphere is going to integrate with all of Microsoft’s infrastructure and services?

GALEN HUNT: In building Azure Sphere, we leveraged pretty deeply a lot of expertise and a lot of talent that we have at Microsoft. Take, for example, the infrastructure that we use to scale out the deployment of new updates. We leveraged the infrastructure that Microsoft created for the Windows update service—and, our operating system is much, much smaller than Windows. So now we have the capability to update billions of devices, globally, per hour. We also have a place where we can tie Azure Sphere into the Azure Security Center for IoT.

We also really drew on all of the expertise around Visual Studios for very scalable software development. We brought that power even to the smaller microcontroller class devices.

And the hardware root of trust that we put inside of every single Azure Sphere chip. That hardware root of trust is not something that we just created, just woke up one day and said, hey, let’s build a hardware root of trust from scratch. We actually built it based on our learning from the Xbox console.

The Xbox console, over 15 years has made three huge generational leaps. Those consoles can live in hostile environments—from a digital security perspective and a physical security perspective. So, we’ve taken everything we’ve learned about how to make those devices highly secured and applied it to building the hardware root of trust inside Azure Sphere. These are some of the ways that we’re really leveraging a lot of Microsoft’s deep expertise.

ANN JOHNSON: Today, marks the general availability of Azure Sphere—which I’m super excited about, by the way! But I know you’ve been thinking for a long time about how we solve some of these bigger problems, particularly the explosion of IoT, and how customers are going to have to think about that within the next two, to three, to five, to ten years from now. What are the challenges you see ahead for us, and what are the benefits our customers will be able to realize?

GALEN HUNT: We’re excited as well—it’s a huge milestone for the team. Even at this point, at GA, we’re only at the beginning of our real journey with our customers. One of our immediate next steps is scaling out the silicon ecosystem. MediaTek is our first silicon partner. Their MT3620 chip is available in volume today, and it’s the perfect chip, especially for guardian modules and adding secure connectivity to many, many devices.

With microcontrollers, there are many, many verticals. They range in everything from toys to home appliances, to big industrial equipment. And no single chip scales across that entire ecosystem effectively, so we’ve engaged other silicon partners. In June, NXP, the world’s number one microcontroller manufacturer, announced their timeline for their very first Azure Sphere chip. And that chip will add much larger compute capabilities. For example, they’ll do AI, and vision, and graphics, and more sophisticated user interfaces. And then in October, Qualcomm announced that they’ll build the very first cellular native Azure Sphere chip.

The other place we see ourselves growing is in adding more enterprise readiness features. As we’ve engaged with some of our early partners, for example, Starbucks, and have helped them deploy Azure Sphere across their stores in North America, we’ve realized that there’s a lot we can do to really help integrate Azure Sphere better with existing enterprise systems to make that very, very smooth.

ANN JOHNSON: There’s a lot of noise about tech regulations, certainly about IoT and different device manufacturing procedures. How are we thinking about innovation in the context of balancing it with regulation?

GALEN HUNT: So, let’s talk about innovation and regulation. There are times when you want to step out of the way and just let people innovate as much as possible. And then there are times as an industry, or as a society we want to make sure we establish a baseline.

Take food safety, for example. The science of food safety is very well established. Having regulations makes sure that no one cuts corners on safety for the sake of economic expediency. Most countries have embraced some kind of regulations around food safety.

IoT is another industry where it’s in everybody’s favor that all devices be secure. If consumers and enterprises can know that every device has a strong foundation of security and trustworthiness, then they’ll be more likely to buy devices, and build devices, and deploy devices.

And so I really see it as an opportunity whereby collectively and, with governments encouraging baseline levels of security, agreeing on a strong foundation of security we’ll all feel confident in our environment, and that’s really a positive thing for everybody.

ANN JOHNSON: That’s really a great perspective, and I think that we’ve always been that way at Microsoft, right? We view regulation in a positive way and thinking that it needs to be the right regulation across a wide variety of things that we’re doing, whether it be AI, just making sure that it’s being used for ethical use cases.

Which brings me to that last-wrap question, what’s next, what are your next big plans, what’s your next big security disruption?

GALEN HUNT: We recently announced new chips from NXP and Qualcomm, we’ll continue our focus on expanding our silicon and hardware ecosystem to deliver more choice for our customers. And then beyond that, our next big plan is to take Azure Sphere everywhere. We’ve demonstrated it’s possible, but I think we’re just starting to scratch the surface of secured IoT. There’s so much ability for innovation, and the devices that people are building, and the way that we’re using devices. When we’re really able to close this digital feedback loop and really interact between the digital world and the physical world, it’s just a tremendous opportunity, and so that’s where I’m going.

ANN JOHNSON: Excellent, well, I really appreciate the conversation. Azure Sphere is a great example of the notion that while cybersecurity is complex, it does not have to be complicated. Azure Sphere helps our customers overcome today’s complicated IoT security challenges. Thank you, Galen, for some great insights into the current IoT security landscape and how Microsoft and Azure Sphere are advancing IoT device security with the broad availability of Azure Sphere today.

 

If you are interested in learning more about how Azure Sphere can help you securely fast track your next IoT innovation.

 

About Ann Johnson and Galen Hunt

Ann Johnson is the Corporate Vice President of the Cybersecurity Solutions Group at Microsoft where she oversees the go-to-market strategies of cybersecurity solutions. As part of this charter, she leads and drives the evolution and implementation of Microsoft’s short- and long-term security, compliance, and identity solutions roadmap with alignment across the marketing, engineering, and product teams.

Prior to joining Microsoft, her executive leadership roles included Chief Executive Officer of Boundless Spatial, President and Chief Operating Officer of vulnerability management pioneer Qualys, Inc., and Vice President of World Wide Identity and Fraud Sales at RSA Security, a subsidiary of EMC Corporation.

Dr. Galen Hunt founded and leads the Microsoft team responsible for Azure Sphere. His team’s mission is to ensure that every IoT device on the planet is secure and trustworthy. Previously, Dr. Hunt pioneered technologies ranging from confidential cloud computing to light-weight container virtualization, type-safe operating systems, and video streaming. Dr. Hunt was a member of Microsoft’s founding cloud computing team.

Dr. Hunt holds over 100 patents, a B.S. degree in Physics from University of Utah and Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in Computer Science from the University of Rochester.

The post Azure Sphere—Microsoft’s answer to escalating IoT threats—reaches general availability appeared first on Microsoft Security.