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The world is your authentication and identity oyster

July 2nd, 2020 No comments

This blog post is part of the Microsoft Intelligence Security Association guest blog series. To learn more about MISA, go here.

The world is your authentication/identity oyster

If you’re older than 10 years of age you’ve undoubtedly heard the phrase “The world is your oyster.” This basically means that you are able to take the opportunities that life has to offer. Nothing could be more accurate in the description of technology of the world today. Now if we take some liberties with that phrase, we could also say that “the world is your authentication/identity oyster.” There are countless options available to the organizations as to how they want to execute on their vision.

Too long we’ve been collectively saddled with the prospect of passwords as one of the default authentication protocols. This has proven itself to be a standard in many respects. We’ve been taught for decades that passwords are some level of security that can be implemented to protect websites and so forth. This is an unfortunate notion that we need to dispel.

The problem here is that passwords have come to a point where they need to be replaced with an advanced system of security for authentication. Let’s take this as an example: If someone knows a password it by no means ensures who that person is who is utilizing it. Yes, there is some understanding of trust as to who has the use of said password, but over the years I’ve learned that this is by no means a guarantee. As an example, 86 percent of breaches were financially motivated, according to the 2020 Verizon DBIR.

When attackers managed to compromise a website they will re-use the credentials that they capture in a bid to increase their access to other websites simply because they understand that people are creatures of habit and will reuse the same password in multiple places in a bid to reduce the mental fatigue that comes with trying to remember them all. Even when I check in my own password manager application, I’ll note that I have over 900 passwords alone. It is too little surprise that people still write them on post-it notes to this very day.

There are so many options available to remedy our password predicament. MFA is an excellent example of how to move forward with a better solution to authentication. When we look at something such as MFA we have to understand that there is a culture shift involved. Eighty percent of security breaches involve compromised passwords. People can be hesitant and resistant to change but will embrace that change when security has been democratized.

If it is easy for a non-technical person to use, then they will adopt that and then by extension improve the security of your organization. Case in point, my mother can use the Duo app as an example to authenticate to her email and other applications. When you have applications written for engineers by engineers in the hands of the layperson you can imagine how that will end. The security tools need to be easy to use.

If you’re using a push-based application or even something with the W3C WebAuthN open standard, which can leverage an API to replace passwords, you can improve the security of your organization by removing passwords from the mix. Using technologies such as this in conjunction with Azure AD as an example will reduce the risk to an organization. You would have authenticated users access to your systems without having to wonder if the person with the password logging in from a coffee shop in London, New York, or Toronto is in fact who you assume they should be.

The tools are at your disposal today to improve your security posture, reduce risk, and ultimately costs when users can self-manage. When security technology has been democratized it leads to wider adoption by techno-savvy users and luddites alike.

Ready to get started? Sign up for a free trial at signup.duo.com.

Want to learn more about Duo and Microsoft together?

About Duo Security

Duo helps Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) customers move to the cloud safely and securely by verifying the identity of the users with strong multi-factor authentication (MFA), and the trust of the device using device hygiene insights. Our joint customers use that information to create robust access policies that are enforced before granting access to applications both on-premises and in the cloud.

How Duo helps protect Microsoft Applications: Duo + Microsoft Partnership Page

Learn more: Duo Security – Azure Active Directory 

To learn more about the Microsoft Intelligent Security Association (MISA), visit our website where you can learn about the MISA program, product integrations, and find MISA members. Visit the video playlist to learn about the strength of member integrations with Microsoft products.

For more information about Microsoft Security Solutions, visit the Microsoft Security website. Bookmark the Security blog to keep up with our expert coverage of security matters. Also, follow us at @MSFTSecurity for the latest news and updates on cybersecurity.

The post The world is your authentication and identity oyster appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Zero Trust Deployment Guide for Microsoft Azure Active Directory

April 30th, 2020 No comments

Microsoft is providing a series of deployment guides for customers who have engaged in a Zero Trust security strategy. In this guide, we cover how to deploy and configure Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) capabilities to support your Zero Trust security strategy.

For simplicity, this document will focus on ideal deployments and configuration. We will call out the integrations that need Microsoft products other than Azure AD and we will note the licensing needed within Azure AD (Premium P1 vs P2), but we will not describe multiple solutions (one with a lower license and one with a higher license).

Azure AD at the heart of your Zero Trust strategy

Azure AD provides critical functionality for your Zero Trust strategy. It enables strong authentication, a point of integration for device security, and the core of your user-centric policies to guarantee least-privileged access. Azure AD’s Conditional Access capabilities are the policy decision point for access to resources based on user identity, environment, device health, and risk—verified explicitly at the point of access. In the following sections, we will showcase how you can implement your Zero Trust strategy with Azure AD.

Establish your identity foundation with Azure AD

A Zero Trust strategy requires that we verify explicitly, use least privileged access principles, and assume breach. Azure Active Directory can act as the policy decision point to enforce your access policies based on insights on the user, device, target resource, and environment. To do this, we need to put Azure Active Directory in the path of every access request—connecting every user and every app or resource through this identity control plane. In addition to productivity gains and improved user experiences from single sign-on (SSO) and consistent policy guardrails, connecting all users and apps provides Azure AD with the signal to make the best possible decisions about the authentication/authorization risk.

  • Connect your users, groups, and devices:
    Maintaining a healthy pipeline of your employees’ identities as well as the necessary security artifacts (groups for authorization and devices for extra access policy controls) puts you in the best place to use consistent identities and controls, which your users already benefit from on-premises and in the cloud:

    1. Start by choosing the right authentication option for your organization. While we strongly prefer to use an authentication method that primarily uses Azure AD (to provide you the best brute force, DDoS, and password spray protection), follow our guidance on making the decision that’s right for your organization and your compliance needs.
    2. Only bring the identities you absolutely need. For example, use going to the cloud as an opportunity to leave behind service accounts that only make sense on-premises; leave on-premises privileged roles behind (more on that under privileged access), etc.
    3. If your enterprise has more than 100,000 users, groups, and devices combined, we recommend you follow our guidance building a high performance sync box that will keep your life cycle up-to-date.
  • Integrate all your applications with Azure AD:
    As mentioned earlier, SSO is not only a convenient feature for your users, but it’s also a security posture, as it prevents users from leaving copies of their credentials in various apps and helps avoid them getting used to surrendering their credentials due to excessive prompting. Make sure you do not have multiple IAM engines in your environment. Not only does this diminish the amount of signal that Azure AD sees and allow bad actors to live in the seams between the two IAM engines, it can also lead to poor user experience and your business partners becoming the first doubters of your Zero Trust strategy. Azure AD supports a variety of ways you can bring apps to authenticate with it:

    1. Integrate modern enterprise applications that speak OAuth2.0 or SAML.
    2. For Kerberos and Form-based auth applications, you can integrate them using the Azure AD Application Proxy.
    3. If you publish your legacy applications using application delivery networks/controllers, Azure AD is able to integrate with most of the major ones (such as Citrix, Akamai, F5, etc.).
    4. To help migrate your apps off of existing/older IAM engines, we provide a number of resources—including tools to help you discover and migrate apps off of ADFS.
  • Automate provisioning to applications:
    Once you have your users’ identities in Azure AD, you can now use Azure AD to power pushing those user identities into your various cloud applications. This gives you a tighter identity lifecycle integration within those apps. Use this detailed guide to deploy provisioning into your SaaS applications.
  • Get your logging and reporting in order:
    As you build your estate in Azure AD with authentication, authorization, and provisioning, it’s important to have strong operational insights into what is happening in the directory. Follow this guide to learn how to to persist and analyze the logs from Azure AD either in Azure or using a SIEM system of choice.

Enacting the 1st principle: least privilege

Giving the right access at the right time to only those who need it is at the heart of a Zero Trust philosophy:

  • Plan your Conditional Access deployment:
    Planning your Conditional Access policies in advance and having a set of active and fallback policies is a foundational pillar of your Access Policy enforcement in a Zero Trust deployment. Take the time to configure your trusted IP locations in your environment. Even if you do not use them in a Conditional Access policy, configure these IPs informs the risk of Identity Protection mentioned above. Check out our deployment guidance and best practices for resilient Conditional Access policies.
  • Secure privileged access with privileged identity management:
    With privileged access, you generally take a different track to meeting the end users where they are most likely to need and use the data. You typically want to control the devices, conditions, and credentials that users use to access privileged operations/roles. Check out our detailed guidance on how to take control of your privileged identities and secure them. Keep in mind that in a digitally transformed organization, privileged access is not only administrative access, but also application owner or developer access that can change the way your mission critical apps run and handle data. Check out our detailed guide on how to use Privileged Identity Management (P2) to secure privileged identities.
  • Restrict user consent to applications:
    User consent to applications is a very common way for modern applications to get access to organizational resources. However, we recommend you restrict user consent and manage consent requests to ensure that no unnecessary exposure of your organization’s data to apps occurs. This also means that you need to review prior/existing consent in your organization for any excessive or malicious consent.
  • Manage entitlements (Azure AD Premium P2):
    With applications centrally authenticating and driven from Azure AD, you should streamline your access request, approval, and recertification process to make sure that the right people have the right access and that you have a trail of why users in your organization have the access they have. Using entitlement management, you can create access packages that they can request as they join different teams/project and that would assign them access to the associated resources (applications, SharePoint sites, group memberships). Check out how you can start a package. If deploying entitlement management is not possible for your organization at this time, we recommend you at least enable self-service paradigms in your organization by deploying self-service group management and self-service application access.

Enacting the 2nd principle: verify explicitly

Provide Azure AD with a rich set of credentials and controls that it can use to verify the user at all times.

  • Roll out Azure multi-factor authentication (MFA) (P1):
    This is a foundational piece of reducing user session risk. As users appear on new devices and from new locations, being able to respond to an MFA challenge is one of the most direct ways that your users can teach us that these are familiar devices/locations as they move around the world (without having administrators parse individual signals). Check out this deployment guide.
  • Enable Azure AD Hybrid Join or Azure AD Join:
    If you are managing the user’s laptop/computer, bringing that information into Azure AD and use it to help make better decisions. For example, you may choose to allow rich client access to data (clients that have offline copies on the computer) if you know the user is coming from a machine that your organization controls and manages. If you do not bring this in, you will likely choose to block access from rich clients, which may result in your users working around your security or using Shadow IT. Check out our resources for Azure AD Hybrid Join or Azure AD Join.
  • Enable Microsoft Intune for managing your users’ mobile devices (EMS):
    The same can be said about user mobile devices as laptops. The more you know about them (patch level, jailbroken, rooted, etc.) the more you are able to trust or mistrust them and provide a rationale for why you block/allow access. Check out our Intune device enrollment guide to get started.
  • Start rolling out passwordless credentials:
    With Azure AD now supporting FIDO 2.0 and passwordless phone sign-in, you can move the needle on the credentials that your users (especially sensitive/privileged users) are using on a day-to-day basis. These credentials are strong authentication factors that can mitigate risk as well. Our passwordless authentication deployment guide walks you through how to roll out passwordless credentials in your organization.

Enacting the 3rd principle: assume breach

Provide Azure AD with a rich set of credentials and controls that it can use to verify the user.

  • Deploy Azure AD Password Protection:
    While enabling other methods to verify users explicitly, you should not forget about weak passwords, password spray and breach replay attacks. Read this blog to find out why classic complex password policies are not tackling the most prevalent password attacks. Then follow this guidance to enable Azure AD Password Protection for your users in the cloud first and then on-premises as well.
  • Block legacy authentication:
    One of the most common attack vectors for malicious actors is to use stolen/replayed credentials against legacy protocols, such as SMTP, that cannot do modern security challenges. We recommend you block legacy authentication in your organization.
  • Enable identity protection (Azure AD Premium 2):
    Enabling identity protection for your users will provide you with more granular session/user risk signal. You’ll be able to investigate risk and confirm compromise or dismiss the signal which will help the engine understand better what risk looks like in your environment.
  • Enable restricted session to use in access decisions:
    To illustrate, let’s take a look at controls in Exchange Online and SharePoint Online (P1): When a user’s risk is low but they are signing in from an unknown device, you may want to allow them access to critical resources, but not allow them to do things that leave your organization in a non-compliant state. Now you can configure Exchange Online and SharePoint Online to offer the user a restricted session that allows them to read emails or view files, but not download them and save them on an untrusted device. Check out our guides for enabling limited access with SharePoint Online and Exchange Online.
  • Enable Conditional Access integration with Microsoft Cloud App Security (MCAS) (E5):
    Using signals emitted after authentication and with MCAS proxying requests to application, you will be able to monitor sessions going to SaaS Applications and enforce restrictions. Check out our MCAS and Conditional Access integration guidance and see how this can even be extended to on-premises apps.
  • Enable Microsoft Cloud App Security (MCAS) integration with identity protection (E5):
    Microsoft Cloud App Security is a UEBA product monitoring user behavior inside SaaS and modern applications. This gives Azure AD signal and awareness about what happened to the user after they authenticated and received a token. If the user pattern starts to look suspicious (user starts to download gigabytes of data from OneDrive or starts to send spam emails in Exchange Online), then a signal can be fed to Azure AD notifying it that the user seems to be compromised or high risk and on the next access request from this user; Azure AD can take correct action to verify the user or block them. Just enabling MCAS monitoring will enrich the identity protection signal. Check out our integration guidance to get started.
  • Integrate Azure Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) with Microsoft Cloud App Security:
    Once you’ve successfully deployed and configured Azure ATP, enable the integration with Microsoft Cloud App Security to bring on-premises signal into the risk signal we know about the user. This enables Azure AD to know that a user is indulging in risky behavior while accessing on-premises, non-modern resources (like File Shares) which can then be factored into overall user risk to block further access in the cloud. You will be able to see a combined Priority Score for each user at risk to give a holistic view of which ones your SOC should focus on.
  • Enable Microsoft Defender ATP (E5):
    Microsoft Defender ATP allows you to attest to Windows machines health and whether they are undergoing a compromise and feed that into mitigating risk at runtime. Whereas Domain Join gives you a sense of control, Defender ATP allows you to react to a malware attack at near real time by detecting patterns where multiple user devices are hitting untrustworthy sites and react by raising their device/user risk at runtime. See our guidance on configuring Conditional Access in Defender ATP.

Conclusion

We hope the above guides help you deploy the identity pieces central to a successful Zero Trust strategy. Make sure to check out the other deployment guides in the series by following the Microsoft Security blog.

The post Zero Trust Deployment Guide for Microsoft Azure Active Directory appeared first on Microsoft Security.

Windows Defender ATP integrates with Microsoft Information Protection to discover, protect, and monitor sensitive data on Windows devices

Digital transformation and the transition to a modern workplace encourage employee engagement, productivity, and collaboration. This transition poses major challenges in protecting sensitive information. In the modern workplace, the perimeter between the corporate network and the cloud are fading. Sensitive data constantly travels between different locations and is often shared with others both inside and outside the organization. This significantly increases the attack surface and makes identifying, protecting, and monitoring sensitive data challenging.

Additionally, the threat landscape is evolving. External adversaries and insider threats are becoming more sophisticated and dangerous. Data breaches are at an all-time high in terms of both the number of breaches and the overall severity and business impact. As a result, governments and regulators are instituting stricter regulations with unprecedented fines for not properly protecting and governing sensitive information.

Traditional solutions that put walls around your network perimeter do not suffice. You are at risk of over-protecting where you shouldnt, degrading employee productivity by interrupting legitimate workflows, and under-protecting where you should when sensitive data is being exfiltrated.

Consider the following principles when shaping your information protection strategy:

  1. Visibility You cant protect what you cant see. Strive to achieve complete visibility into sensitive data across all repositories.
  2. Data-centric protection Protect your data, not your perimeter. Apply information protection capabilities that are content-aware to improve protection coverage and reduce end-user friction due to unnecessary interruptions. Make sure sensitive data stays protected wherever it goes; this is especially important in a modern workplace, where data is constantly on the move.
  3. Assume breach Sophisticated attackers, external adversaries, or insider threats will find a way around any wall you put in front of them. Implement post-breach techniques that constantly monitor sensitive data usage in your organization, correlate this data to other suspicious behaviors, and allow you to respond and mitigate risks.

The endpoint is a key point of control when implementing an effective information protection strategy based on these principles. Endpoints are often the entry for sophisticated attacks conducted by an external adversary or an insider threat. Combine it with the fact that endpoints are usually the darkest spot in the enterprise for security and compliance teams, and you end up with a critical weakness in the enterprise information security posture.

Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection (Windows Defender ATP), Microsofts endpoint protection platform, addresses this challenge by integrating with Azure Information Protection, Microsofts data classification, labeling, and protection solution. This integration empowers Windows to natively understand Azure Information Protection sensitivity labels, to provide visibility into sensitive data on endpoints, to protect sensitive data based on its content, and to detect and respond to post-breach malicious activity that involves or affects sensitive data.

Windows Defender ATP is built into the OS, removing the need for deployment and agent maintenance, ensuring that end-user experience is not impacted when performing legitimate business workflows. No on-premises infrastructure or endpoint agents are required. The seamless integration with Azure Information Protection reporting and management experience ensures that data administrators can continue to leverage their existing Azure Information Protection experience to manage these new capabilities.

Discover sensitive documents on Windows devices

Windows Defender ATPs built-in sensors discovers labeled data on all devices monitored by the Windows Defender ATP service. This data is then seamlessly plugged into the Azure Information Protection reporting experience and enriched with labeled documents discovered on Windows devices. This allows existing Azure Information Protection customers to get instant visibility into sensitive data on devices using the same dashboard and analytics tools they use today.

Figure 1. Azure Information Protection Data discovery dashboard shows data discovered by both Windows Defender ATP and Azure Information Protection

It doesnt end there. Being an endpoint protection suite, Windows Defender ATP monitors and calculates device machine risk level an aggregated indicator of active security threats on each device. This data is also shared with Azure Information Protection reports, allowing data administrators to proactively understand whether sensitive corporate data resides on any compromised devices. To understand why the device is compromised, all it takes is a single click in the Azure Information Protection dashboard to be directed to that devices record in Windows Defender ATP, where the administrator can investigate and mitigate detected security threats.

Figure 2. Azure Information Protection Data discovery dashboard shows device risk calculation

Turning on this integration is a matter of a single flip of a switch in the advanced features settings page in Windows Defender Security Center. Windows endpoints will start discovering labeled documents immediately.

Figure 3. Windows Defender Security Center Settings page

Figure 3. Windows Defender Security Center Settings page

Prevent sensitive data leaks from Windows devices

Windows Defender ATP can further protect sensitive data by providing data loss prevention (DLP) functionality. Built using the combined Windows Defender ATP native OS sensors and its advanced cloud-based analytics, Windows Defender ATP can help detect and mitigate data leak risks, ranging from accidental end-user mistake to a sophisticated malicious attack.

It all starts from the Office 365 Security and Compliance Center (SCC), Microsofts unified management console for information protection, where you can manage information protection configuration settings on Windows devices. As part of the label policy, you can define whether files with a specific label applied will be protected by Windows Defender ATP.

Figure 4. Office Security & Compliance Center  Endpoint data loss prevention configuration page

Figure 4. Office Security & Compliance Center Endpoint data loss prevention configuration page

Once that policy is in place, Windows Defender ATP will start protecting documents with a matching label. Protection is applied by automatically enabling Windows Information Protection, which prevents unallowed client apps, cloud apps, and network locations from accessing protected files and their content, reducing the risk of data leak.

In addition, Windows Defender ATP integrates sensitive data awareness into Windows Defender Security Center. Each incident or alert raised in Windows Defender Security Center includes a data sensitivity attribute that is generated by aggregating the sensitivity of all the labeled files discovered on devices that are affected by the incident. This allows security analysts to prioritize incident response based on data sensitivity. When investigating an incident, security analysts can use data sensitivity context across the entire investigation from the incident dashboard, through analyzing sensitive data exposure of specific machines, all the way to Advanced hunting.

Figure 5. Windows Defender Security Center Incident queue, sorted by data sensitivity

Conclusion

Protecting sensitive data requires a comprehensive approach. Sensitive data stored on devices that are constantly on the move presents its own unique challenges. Windows Defender ATP and Azure Information Protection work together to effectively reduce the possibility of losing sensitive data. Together, these solutions provide discovery and protection capabilities required to govern and protect sensitive data, enforce compliance, and proactively mitigate risks.

These are just the first few steps weve taken to enhance the information protection capabilities. Stay tuned for more upcoming features built into Windows 10.

Start here to learn how you can leverage of this capability.

 

 

 

Omri Amdursky
Windows Defender ATP team

 

 

 


Talk to us

Questions, concerns, or insights on this story? Join discussions at the Microsoft community and Windows Defender Security Intelligence.

Follow us on Twitter @WDSecurity and Facebook Windows Defender Security Intelligence.

The post Windows Defender ATP integrates with Microsoft Information Protection to discover, protect, and monitor sensitive data on Windows devices appeared first on Microsoft Secure.

Windows Defender ATP integrates with Microsoft Information Protection to discover, protect, and monitor sensitive data on Windows devices

Digital transformation and the transition to a modern workplace encourage employee engagement, productivity, and collaboration. This transition poses major challenges in protecting sensitive information. In the modern workplace, the perimeter between the corporate network and the cloud are fading. Sensitive data constantly travels between different locations and is often shared with others both inside and outside the organization. This significantly increases the attack surface and makes identifying, protecting, and monitoring sensitive data challenging.

Additionally, the threat landscape is evolving. External adversaries and insider threats are becoming more sophisticated and dangerous. Data breaches are at an all-time high in terms of both the number of breaches and the overall severity and business impact. As a result, governments and regulators are instituting stricter regulations with unprecedented fines for not properly protecting and governing sensitive information.

Traditional solutions that put walls around your network perimeter do not suffice. You are at risk of over-protecting where you shouldnt, degrading employee productivity by interrupting legitimate workflows, and under-protecting where you should when sensitive data is being exfiltrated.

Consider the following principles when shaping your information protection strategy:

  1. Visibility You cant protect what you cant see. Strive to achieve complete visibility into sensitive data across all repositories.
  2. Data-centric protection Protect your data, not your perimeter. Apply information protection capabilities that are content-aware to improve protection coverage and reduce end-user friction due to unnecessary interruptions. Make sure sensitive data stays protected wherever it goes; this is especially important in a modern workplace, where data is constantly on the move.
  3. Assume breach Sophisticated attackers, external adversaries, or insider threats will find a way around any wall you put in front of them. Implement post-breach techniques that constantly monitor sensitive data usage in your organization, correlate this data to other suspicious behaviors, and allow you to respond and mitigate risks.

The endpoint is a key point of control when implementing an effective information protection strategy based on these principles. Endpoints are often the entry for sophisticated attacks conducted by an external adversary or an insider threat. Combine it with the fact that endpoints are usually the darkest spot in the enterprise for security and compliance teams, and you end up with a critical weakness in the enterprise information security posture.

Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection (Windows Defender ATP), Microsofts endpoint protection platform, addresses this challenge by integrating with Azure Information Protection, Microsofts data classification, labeling, and protection solution. This integration empowers Windows to natively understand Azure Information Protection sensitivity labels, to provide visibility into sensitive data on endpoints, to protect sensitive data based on its content, and to detect and respond to post-breach malicious activity that involves or affects sensitive data.

Windows Defender ATP is built into the OS, removing the need for deployment and agent maintenance, ensuring that end-user experience is not impacted when performing legitimate business workflows. No on-premises infrastructure or endpoint agents are required. The seamless integration with Azure Information Protection reporting and management experience ensures that data administrators can continue to leverage their existing Azure Information Protection experience to manage these new capabilities.

Discover sensitive documents on Windows devices

Windows Defender ATPs built-in sensors discovers labeled data on all devices monitored by the Windows Defender ATP service. This data is then seamlessly plugged into the Azure Information Protection reporting experience and enriched with labeled documents discovered on Windows devices. This allows existing Azure Information Protection customers to get instant visibility into sensitive data on devices using the same dashboard and analytics tools they use today.

Figure 1. Azure Information Protection Data discovery dashboard shows data discovered by both Windows Defender ATP and Azure Information Protection

It doesnt end there. Being an endpoint protection suite, Windows Defender ATP monitors and calculates device machine risk level an aggregated indicator of active security threats on each device. This data is also shared with Azure Information Protection reports, allowing data administrators to proactively understand whether sensitive corporate data resides on any compromised devices. To understand why the device is compromised, all it takes is a single click in the Azure Information Protection dashboard to be directed to that devices record in Windows Defender ATP, where the administrator can investigate and mitigate detected security threats.

Figure 2. Azure Information Protection Data discovery dashboard shows device risk calculation

Turning on this integration is a matter of a single flip of a switch in the advanced features settings page in Windows Defender Security Center. Windows endpoints will start discovering labeled documents immediately.

Figure 3. Windows Defender Security Center Settings page

Figure 3. Windows Defender Security Center Settings page

Prevent sensitive data leaks from Windows devices

Windows Defender ATP can further protect sensitive data by providing data loss prevention (DLP) functionality. Built using the combined Windows Defender ATP native OS sensors and its advanced cloud-based analytics, Windows Defender ATP can help detect and mitigate data leak risks, ranging from accidental end-user mistake to a sophisticated malicious attack.

It all starts from the Office 365 Security and Compliance Center (SCC), Microsofts unified management console for information protection, where you can manage information protection configuration settings on Windows devices. As part of the label policy, you can define whether files with a specific label applied will be protected by Windows Defender ATP.

Figure 4. Office Security & Compliance Center  Endpoint data loss prevention configuration page

Figure 4. Office Security & Compliance Center Endpoint data loss prevention configuration page

Once that policy is in place, Windows Defender ATP will start protecting documents with a matching label. Protection is applied by automatically enabling Windows Information Protection, which prevents unallowed client apps, cloud apps, and network locations from accessing protected files and their content, reducing the risk of data leak.

In addition, Windows Defender ATP integrates sensitive data awareness into Windows Defender Security Center. Each incident or alert raised in Windows Defender Security Center includes a data sensitivity attribute that is generated by aggregating the sensitivity of all the labeled files discovered on devices that are affected by the incident. This allows security analysts to prioritize incident response based on data sensitivity. When investigating an incident, security analysts can use data sensitivity context across the entire investigation from the incident dashboard, through analyzing sensitive data exposure of specific machines, all the way to Advanced hunting.

Figure 5. Windows Defender Security Center Incident queue, sorted by data sensitivity

Conclusion

Protecting sensitive data requires a comprehensive approach. Sensitive data stored on devices that are constantly on the move presents its own unique challenges. Windows Defender ATP and Azure Information Protection work together to effectively reduce the possibility of losing sensitive data. Together, these solutions provide discovery and protection capabilities required to govern and protect sensitive data, enforce compliance, and proactively mitigate risks.

These are just the first few steps weve taken to enhance the information protection capabilities. Stay tuned for more upcoming features built into Windows 10.

Start here to learn how you can leverage of this capability.

 

 

 

Omri Amdursky
Windows Defender ATP team

 

 

 


Talk to us

Questions, concerns, or insights on this story? Join discussions at the Microsoft community and Windows Defender Security Intelligence.

Follow us on Twitter @WDSecurity and Facebook Windows Defender Security Intelligence.

The post Windows Defender ATP integrates with Microsoft Information Protection to discover, protect, and monitor sensitive data on Windows devices appeared first on Microsoft Secure.