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Visual Studio IntelliCode supports more languages and learns from your code

December 5th, 2018 No comments

At Build 2018, we announced Visual Studio IntelliCode, a set of AI-assisted capabilities that improve developer productivity. IntelliCode includes features like contextual IntelliSense code completion recommendations, code formatting, and style rule inference.

IntelliCode has just received some major updates that make its context-sensitive AI-assisted IntelliSense recommendations even better. You can download the updated IntelliCode Extension for Visual Studio and IntelliCode Extension for Visual Studio Code today! The Visual Studio extension already works with the newly-release Visual Studio 2019 Preview 1.

AI-assisted IntelliSense recommendations based on your language of choice

Many of you have requested IntelliCode recommendations for your favorite languages. With this update, we’re excited to add four more languages to the list that can get AI-assisted IntelliSense recommendations. In our extension for Visual Studio, C++ and XAML now get IntelliCode alongside existing support for C#. In our extension for Visual Studio Code, TypeScript/JavaScript and Java are added alongside existing support for Python.

We’ll be sharing more details about IntelliCode’s support for each language on their respective blogs [C++ | TypeScript and JavaScript | Java]

AI-assisted IntelliSense for C# with recommendations based on your own code

Until now, IntelliCode’s recommendations have been based on learning patterns from thousands of open source GitHub repos. But what if you’re using code that isn’t in that set of repos? Perhaps you use a lot of internal utility and base class libraries, or domain-specific libraries that aren’t commonly used in open source code, and would like to see IntelliCode recommendations for them too? If you’re using C#, you can now have IntelliCode learn patterns and make recommendations based on your own code!

When you open Visual Studio after installing the updated IntelliCode Extension for Visual Studio, you’ll see a prompt that lets you know about training on your code, and will direct you to the brand new IntelliCode page to get started. You can also find the new page under View > Other Windows > IntelliCode.  Once training is done, we’ll let you know about the top classes we found usage for, so you can just open a C# file and start typing to try out the new recommendations. We keep the trained models secured, so only you and those who have been given your model’s sharing link can access them–so your model and what it’s learned about your code stay private to you. See our FAQ for more details.

Check out Allison’s video below to see how this new feature works.

Get Involved

As you can see, IntelliCode is growing new capabilities fast. Get the IntelliCode Extension for Visual Studio and the IntelliCode Extension for Visual Studio Code to try right away, and let us know what you think.  You can also find more details about the extensions in our FAQ.

IntelliCode and its underlying service are in preview at present. If you hit issues using the new features and you’re using Visual Studio, use the built-in Visual Studio “Report a Problem” option, and mention IntelliCode in your report. If you’re a Visual Studio Code user, just head over to our GitHub issues page and report your problem there.

If you want to learn more or keep up with the project as we expand the capabilities to more scenarios and other languages, please sign up for email updates. Thanks!

Mark Wilson-Thomas, Senior Program Manager

@MarkPavWT  #VSIntelliCode

Mark is a Program Manager on the Visual Studio IntelliCode team. He’s been building developer tools for over 10 years. Prior to IntelliCode, he worked on the Visual Studio Editor, and on tools for Office, SQL, WPF and Silverlight.

TypeScript: an open and interoperable language

October 1st, 2012 No comments

Today Microsoft announced the release of the TypeScript preview, a new open and interoperable language for application scale JavaScript development. The TypeScript compiler is available as open source on CodePlex.

TypeScript is a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript. TypeScript starts and ends in JavaScript. You can read more details in Soma’s blog, on the TypeScript site and on CodePlex.

So, how is TypeScript open?

The TypeScript language is made available under the Open Web Foundation’s OWFa 1.0 Specification Agreement, and the community is invited to discuss the language specification. Microsoft’s implementation of the compiler is also available on CodePlex under the Apache 2.0 license. There you can view the roadmap, and over the next few weeks and months you’ll see the TypeScript team continue to develop on CodePlex in the open.

TypeScript builds upon the good work happening in the TC39 committee, which determines the direction of the ECMAScript standard, the formal standard for JavaScript. Microsoft continues to work with the committee to evolve the language and runtime capabilities. Should the community desire the TypeScript team to go even further and submit TypeScript to the standards body, the team is open to that too.

And how is it interoperable?

All JavaScript is TypeScript, such that you can literally copy-and-paste from an existing JavaScript program into a TypeScript file. You can also create TypeScript declare files to annotate the types for existing libraries, enabling great tooling experiences without having to modify the libraries themselves (the TypeScript team has included TypeScript files to declare the types for several popular JavaScript libraries like jQuery, MongoDB, and the DOM). Over the coming weeks, we plan to partner with developer communities that create these libraries to ensure that the TypeScript files that declare the types support the best developer experience.

Because TypeScript produces standards-compliant JavaScript, TypeScript is consistent with Microsoft’s commitment to Same Markup and an interoperable web: the output of the TypeScript compiler runs on any browser, in any host, on any operating system. Further, it already plugs into your existing JavaScript toolchain (minifiers, lint checkers, build systems, command line tools).

Last but not least, you will see on the site that you can develop TypeScript code using the online playground tool or Visual Studio 2012. But this is not it! You can also use Sublime Text, Vim or eMacs as the team has kicked off work on syntax files for these popular editors JavaScript developers love to use. And as the specification is public, anyone can create their own syntax files for other editors as well.

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Give your feedback

TypeScript is one foray into making programming languages and tooling even more productive. Pick it up, take it for a spin, and give your feedback. You can contribute by discussing the language specification or filing a bug.

Olivier Bloch
Senior Technical Evangelist
Microsoft Open Technologies, Inc.