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Archive for the ‘MSE’ Category

Spooky antivirus software

October 30th, 2012 No comments

Judy writes:

My virus protection doesn’t seem to want to stay on. I’ve been able to turn it back on, but when I shut down and then restart my computer later, the virus protection is off again.

Is this some kind of Halloween trick?

Having a virus is no treat

Achieving 100 percent protection from viruses is like chasing a phantom, and Judy’s antivirus software might be turning off because she has a virus.

Learn more about viruses and other malicious software

Having reliable support helps remove the mystery

If your computer is running Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7, Microsoft Security Essentials is available as a free download. If you’re already using it and it has unexpectedly turned off, you can uninstall it and reinstall it. And if doing that doesn’t fix the problem, you can contact support.

Learn more about Microsoft Security Essentials

Antivirus protection in Windows 8

If you’re running Windows 8, you don’t need to download Microsoft Security Essentials or install any other antivirus software. Windows Defender and Windows SmartScreen are built-in security features that provide real-time scanning to help protect your computer from viruses, spyware, and malware.  

Learn more about security in Windows 8

 

NEWS: Microsoft offers most popular US antivirus program

March 29th, 2012 No comments

Have you recently installed Microsoft Security Essentials? Earlier this month, the development tools and data services company, OPSWAT, announced that Microsoft’s free antivirus software was the most popular antivirus program in North America during the last 12 months.

Microsoft Security Essentials is free to download and helps protect personal and small business computers from viruses, spyware, and other malicious software.

Why does the Action Center say I don’t have antivirus software?

November 10th, 2011 No comments

We recently received this question from a reader of this blog:

“Hi! I am running Windows 7 with Windows Defender. Why does the Action Center say that I don’t have antivirus protection?”

Windows Defender comes with Windows 7 and although it is your first line of defense against spyware, it’s not technically antivirus software. The Action Center lets you know you need to download antivirus software. If you want to protect your computer against spyware and viruses, you need to install antivirus software, such as Microsoft Security Essentials. Microsoft Security Essentials is free if your computer is running genuine Windows software and it provides real-time protection against viruses, spyware, and other unwanted software for your personal computer or small business.

Get more information about antivirus software.

Download Microsoft Security Essentials.

FEP, MSE and FCS – and Windows 7 SP1

March 4th, 2011 Comments off

Hello folks!

Did you know that Windows 7 SP1 is available for download? Windows 7 SP1 brings some great features to the platform, and everyone’s pretty excited about it.

We want to make absolutely clear that Windows 7 SP1 is supported by the following endpoint security products:

If in doubt about what you have installed, view your version number, on the Help menu, click About.

If your version is reported in the range of 2.0.1677 to 2.0.2530, then you should:

  • Uninstall the unsupported pre-release version of the of the client currently installed, and
  • Install one of the release antimalware packages listed above, according to your organizational needs.

Thanks!

Note:  The same statements apply for Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 as well; you need the same update to allow FCS function. (Douglas Hill 3/23/2010)

 

Categories: FCS, FEP, MSE, Windows 7 SP1 Tags:

Announcing the Release of Forefront Endpoint Protection 2010

December 16th, 2010 Comments off

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Hello!

We’re proud today with this significant milestone to both Microsoft and you, our customers, in the mission we undertook of converging client management and security, providing effective endpoint protection across all market segments, consumer through enterprise. Shipping FEP 2010 and MSE 2010 products completes a fast development cycle, with tremendous focus on customers, agile engineering, and robust quality!

Today we give you both Forefront Endpoint Protection 2010, a fully integrated antimalware and security management platform that leverages the robust functionality of System Center Configuration Manager 2007, and the latest version of Microsoft Security Essentials, a fully featured antimalware and security protection client for the consumer audience.

Based on customer feedback, we are also releasing FEP 2010 Security Management Pack (FEP SMP). FEP SMP includes real-time server monitoring (through System Center Operations Manager) and optimized server security settings, with the top 16 Microsoft server workloads and roles supported out-of-the-box!

We’ve got resources available for you today:

Thanks!

The Forefront Endpoint Protection Team

Fake Microsoft Security Essentials software on the loose. Don’t be fooled by it!

October 25th, 2010 Comments off

Last week, we saw the re-emergence of another new trojan that is disguising itself as Microsoft’s no-cost antimalware program Microsoft Security Essentials. This imposter is known in the technical world of antimalware combat as “Win32/FakePAV”. FakePAV is a rogue that displays messages that imitate Microsoft Security Essentials threat reports in order to entice the user into downloading and paying for a rogue security scanner. The rogue persistently terminates numerous processes such as Windows Registry Editor, Internet Explorer, Windows Restore and other utilities and applications.

This fake software is distributed by a tactic commonly described as a “drive-by download” and shows up as a hotfix.exe or as an mstsc.exe file. Additionally, after the fake Microsoft Security Essentials software reports it cannot clean the claimed malware infection, it offers to install additional antimalware rogues (with names such as AntiSpySafeguard, Major Defense Kit, Peak Protection, Pest Detector and Red Cross). Lastly, this fake program will try to scare you into purchasing a product.

Before we get to the detailed view of how this trojan works, we want the message to be very clear: This software is a fake. Do not be fooled by this scam. This malware can potentially cause consumers and small business owners harm. Microsoft Security Essentials can be downloaded and used at no cost by users running genuine Windows (Download here: http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/). So anything mimicking Microsoft Security Essentials but asking for any sort of payment is clearly up to no good.

If you have not already updated your security software please do so. Making sure your security software is up-to-date and has the latest definitions is the best way to prevent infections.

And now onto a detailed look at FakePAV. While different FakePAV distributions have different payloads, here is how the current one imitating Microsoft Security Essentials works:

1. It modifies the system so that it runs when Windows starts

2. When you go to execute something it’s watching for, it opens the alert window claiming the program is infected and blocks it from running.

3. You can expand it out for “additional details”

4. If you click “Clean computer” or “Apply actions”, it simulates an attempt to clean the claimed infection

5. You’ll then get an ‘unable to clean’ alert and be instructed to click ‘Scan Online’

6. Clicking this, a list of antimalware programs appears, including several fake removal tools, and you’d need to click Start Scan

7. Once the simulated scan completes, it will claim a solution was found and list products that can ‘clean’ the system (the listed products are fake removal tools).

8. Clicking ‘Free install’ on one of those downloads will download its installer and start installing

If you believe your machine has become infected, we encourage you to use Microsoft Security Essentials to check your PC for malware and to help remove them from your system. You can also find out how to get virus-related assistance at no charge from Microsoft here: http://www.microsoft.com/protect/support/default.mspx.

For more information on this FakePAV please visit our encyclopedia entry at http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Threat/Encyclopedia/Entry.aspx?Name=Rogue%3aWin32%2fFakePAV. It contains a lot of information that may help answer questions about this rogue.

And remember: Microsoft does not charge for Microsoft Security Essentials. You can find the legitimate version of Microsoft Security Essentials at http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials.

Fake Microsoft Security Essentials software on the loose. Don’t be fooled by it!

October 25th, 2010 No comments

Last week, we saw the re-emergence of another new trojan that is disguising itself as Microsoft’s no-cost antimalware program Microsoft Security Essentials. This imposter is known in the technical world of antimalware combat as “Win32/FakePAV”. FakePAV is a rogue that displays messages that imitate Microsoft Security Essentials threat reports in order to entice the user into downloading and paying for a rogue security scanner. The rogue persistently terminates numerous processes such as Windows Registry Editor, Internet Explorer, Windows Restore and other utilities and applications.

This fake software is distributed by a tactic commonly described as a “drive-by download” and shows up as a hotfix.exe or as an mstsc.exe file. Additionally, after the fake Microsoft Security Essentials software reports it cannot clean the claimed malware infection, it offers to install additional antimalware rogues (with names such as AntiSpySafeguard, Major Defense Kit, Peak Protection, Pest Detector and Red Cross). Lastly, this fake program will try to scare you into purchasing a product.

Before we get to the detailed view of how this trojan works, we want the message to be very clear: This software is a fake. Do not be fooled by this scam. This malware can potentially cause consumers and small business owners harm. Microsoft Security Essentials can be downloaded and used at no cost by users running genuine Windows (Download here: http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/). So anything mimicking Microsoft Security Essentials but asking for any sort of payment is clearly up to no good.

If you have not already updated your security software please do so. Making sure your security software is up-to-date and has the latest definitions is the best way to prevent infections.

And now onto a detailed look at FakePAV. While different FakePAV distributions have different payloads, here is how the current one imitating Microsoft Security Essentials works:

1. It modifies the system so that it runs when Windows starts

2. When you go to execute something it’s watching for, it opens the alert window claiming the program is infected and blocks it from running.

3. You can expand it out for “additional details”

4. If you click “Clean computer” or “Apply actions”, it simulates an attempt to clean the claimed infection

5. You’ll then get an ‘unable to clean’ alert and be instructed to click ‘Scan Online’

6. Clicking this, a list of antimalware programs appears, including several fake removal tools, and you’d need to click Start Scan

7. Once the simulated scan completes, it will claim a solution was found and list products that can ‘clean’ the system (the listed products are fake removal tools).

8. Clicking ‘Free install’ on one of those downloads will download its installer and start installing

If you believe your machine has become infected, we encourage you to use Microsoft Security Essentials to check your PC for malware and to help remove them from your system. You can also find out how to get virus-related assistance at no charge from Microsoft here: http://www.microsoft.com/protect/support/default.mspx.

For more information on this FakePAV please visit our encyclopedia entry at http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Threat/Encyclopedia/Entry.aspx?Name=Rogue%3aWin32%2fFakePAV. It contains a lot of information that may help answer questions about this rogue.

And remember: Microsoft does not charge for Microsoft Security Essentials. You can find the legitimate version of Microsoft Security Essentials at http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials.

Fake Microsoft Security Essentials software on the loose. Don’t be fooled by it!

October 25th, 2010 No comments

Last week, we saw the re-emergence of another new trojan that is disguising itself as Microsoft’s no-cost antimalware program Microsoft Security Essentials. This imposter is known in the technical world of antimalware combat as “Win32/FakePAV”. FakePAV is a rogue that displays messages that imitate Microsoft Security Essentials threat reports in order to entice the user into downloading and paying for a rogue security scanner. The rogue persistently terminates numerous processes such as Windows Registry Editor, Internet Explorer, Windows Restore and other utilities and applications.

This fake software is distributed by a tactic commonly described as a “drive-by download” and shows up as a hotfix.exe or as an mstsc.exe file. Additionally, after the fake Microsoft Security Essentials software reports it cannot clean the claimed malware infection, it offers to install additional antimalware rogues (with names such as AntiSpySafeguard, Major Defense Kit, Peak Protection, Pest Detector and Red Cross). Lastly, this fake program will try to scare you into purchasing a product.

Before we get to the detailed view of how this trojan works, we want the message to be very clear: This software is a fake. Do not be fooled by this scam. This malware can potentially cause consumers and small business owners harm. Microsoft Security Essentials can be downloaded and used at no cost by users running genuine Windows (Download here: http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/). So anything mimicking Microsoft Security Essentials but asking for any sort of payment is clearly up to no good.

If you have not already updated your security software please do so. Making sure your security software is up-to-date and has the latest definitions is the best way to prevent infections.

And now onto a detailed look at FakePAV. While different FakePAV distributions have different payloads, here is how the current one imitating Microsoft Security Essentials works:

1. It modifies the system so that it runs when Windows starts

2. When you go to execute something it’s watching for, it opens the alert window claiming the program is infected and blocks it from running.

3. You can expand it out for “additional details”

4. If you click “Clean computer” or “Apply actions”, it simulates an attempt to clean the claimed infection

5. You’ll then get an ‘unable to clean’ alert and be instructed to click ‘Scan Online’

6. Clicking this, a list of antimalware programs appears, including several fake removal tools, and you’d need to click Start Scan

7. Once the simulated scan completes, it will claim a solution was found and list products that can ‘clean’ the system (the listed products are fake removal tools).

8. Clicking ‘Free install’ on one of those downloads will download its installer and start installing

If you believe your machine has become infected, we encourage you to use Microsoft Security Essentials to check your PC for malware and to help remove them from your system. You can also find out how to get virus-related assistance at no charge from Microsoft here: http://www.microsoft.com/protect/support/default.mspx.

For more information on this FakePAV please visit our encyclopedia entry at http://www.microsoft.com/security/portal/Threat/Encyclopedia/Entry.aspx?Name=Rogue%3aWin32%2fFakePAV. It contains a lot of information that may help answer questions about this rogue.

And remember: Microsoft does not charge for Microsoft Security Essentials. You can find the legitimate version of Microsoft Security Essentials at http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials.

Microsoft Security Essentials available to Small Businesses on October 7

October 6th, 2010 Comments off

We announced back in September that Microsoft Security Essentials would be changing its licensing terms and would soon become available to small business on up to 10 PCs. We are happy to announce that beginning tomorrow, October 7, the change will go into effect and small business owners will be able to download and install Microsoft Security Essentials. This new availability will allow small businesses that operate outside of the home to take advantage of Microsoft’s no-cost antimalware service that will help them save time, save money and remain productive while protecting them from viruses, spyware and other malicious threats. If you operate a small business with more than 10 PCs, we do recommend that you consider using the Forefront line products to address your security needs.

In just one year on the market, more than 30 million customers are now enjoying the quiet protection Microsoft Security Essentials provides, and Microsoft is excited to now offer Microsoft Security Essentials to the small business community.

For more information about this new availability, check out the Microsoft SMB Community blog and the feature story on Microsoft.com.

Microsoft Security Essentials available to Small Businesses on October 7

October 6th, 2010 No comments

We announced back in September that Microsoft Security Essentials would be changing its licensing terms and would soon become available to small business on up to 10 PCs. We are happy to announce that beginning tomorrow, October 7, the change will go into effect and small business owners will be able to download and install Microsoft Security Essentials. This new availability will allow small businesses that operate outside of the home to take advantage of Microsoft’s no-cost antimalware service that will help them save time, save money and remain productive while protecting them from viruses, spyware and other malicious threats. If you operate a small business with more than 10 PCs, we do recommend that you consider using the Forefront line products to address your security needs.

In just one year on the market, more than 30 million customers are now enjoying the quiet protection Microsoft Security Essentials provides, and Microsoft is excited to now offer Microsoft Security Essentials to the small business community.

For more information about this new availability, check out the Microsoft SMB Community blog and the feature story on Microsoft.com.

Microsoft Security Essentials available to Small Businesses on October 7

October 6th, 2010 No comments

We announced back in September that Microsoft Security Essentials would be changing its licensing terms and would soon become available to small business on up to 10 PCs. We are happy to announce that beginning tomorrow, October 7, the change will go into effect and small business owners will be able to download and install Microsoft Security Essentials. This new availability will allow small businesses that operate outside of the home to take advantage of Microsoft’s no-cost antimalware service that will help them save time, save money and remain productive while protecting them from viruses, spyware and other malicious threats. If you operate a small business with more than 10 PCs, we do recommend that you consider using the Forefront line products to address your security needs.

In just one year on the market, more than 30 million customers are now enjoying the quiet protection Microsoft Security Essentials provides, and Microsoft is excited to now offer Microsoft Security Essentials to the small business community.

For more information about this new availability, check out the Microsoft SMB Community blog and the feature story on Microsoft.com.